Big Ozark chinquapin

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Lucas
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Big Ozark chinquapin

Post by Lucas » Mon Jun 17, 2019 7:32 am


Click on image to see its original size


Click on image to see its original size

Ozark chinquapin, no doubt, one of the largest left of a very rare tree in this mature state.

Very impressive tree. The best pic of one I have seen that shows its tree form. It's on private property.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/2721207 ... 001059823/

"Ozark chinquapin, Johnson county, Arkansas in bloom last week 54 in circumference at chest high"
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Lucas
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Re: Big Ozark chinquapin

Post by Lucas » Mon Jun 17, 2019 7:41 am


Click on image to see its original size


Click on image to see its original size

https://www.facebook.com/ozarkchinquapi ... ?__tn__=-R

Also, one from Alabama where they were thought extirpated.

"The Ozark chinquapin is not limited to the Ozarks. I know that sounds confusing. Ozark is is the name and with good reason most of the trees are found in the Ozarks. However, genetic work in combination with size and other defining features have shown there have been Ozark chinquapins in Alabama. In recent years they were thought to be extirpated from the state with only botanical samples to prove their former residence. And that is what we thought too.

Then we received an email from Jason Watkins inviting us to the land in Alabama to check out a tree he thought was an Ozark chinquapin. Well we are calling it official. This tree is quite tall, has burs consistent with the Ozark rather than the Allegheny and has no hairs on the young limb portions. Watkins discovery is fascinating in deed because it gives hope for preserving the genetics of these isolated population of Ozark chinquapin.

Keep looking and reporting what you think is an Ozark chinquapin. Now is a great time to identify the trees because they are blooming."
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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ElijahW
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Re: Big Ozark chinquapin

Post by ElijahW » Mon Jun 17, 2019 4:31 pm

Lucas,

Cool tree. It looks to have some height as well as girth. I’ve never seen an Ozark Chinquapin, and only Allegheny Chinquapins in planted collections. Thanks for sharing,

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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Rand
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Re: Big Ozark chinquapin

Post by Rand » Mon Jun 17, 2019 7:48 pm

Wow. That compares favorably to the surviving American trees you find here and there. In my Uncle's woods there are a few small hills left over from when he dug the pond. I wonder if they drain well enough to enable these trees to survive, since they are said to grow fine on limestone bedrock in their native range.

I had two chinese chestnuts that got flooded out on flattish terrain this spring. Bummer.

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Lucas
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Re: Big Ozark chinquapin

Post by Lucas » Fri Jun 21, 2019 1:38 pm

An even more interesting scenario. Sandra Anagnostakis does id on chestnut species and thinks this is something special, maybe, even a new species. Stayed tuned, I guess.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/2721207 ... 001059823/

Sandra Anagnostakis WOW!!!! I don't know what this tree is, but it isn't a C. ozarkensis! I am really interested in what it might be. Have you looked at the Arkansas USDA chestnut cards on my web page to see if anything was sent to that area?
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Lucas Machias
Lucas Machias Really? Seems like OCF should know as they are aware of it. Maybe ask them. Too bad, if it is not. Why do you say not so?
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Sandra Anagnostakis
Sandra Anagnostakis It is much more important than just another Ozark chinquapin! Might be like one of Hill Craddock's "not dentata" trees. Who are OCF? The chinquapin foundation?
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Lucas Machias
Lucas Machias Sandra Anagnostakis not dentata means what? Yes to OCF.
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Sandra Anagnostakis
Sandra Anagnostakis Lucas Machias it reminds me of some of Hill's trees that don't fit anything! There are more chestnut species under heaven than we have imagined in our wildest dreams.
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Lucas Machias
Lucas Machias Sandra Anagnostakis "more chestnut species under heaven than we have imagined in our wildest dreams"
Wow, quite a statement! What does it mean? Are you saying there are unknown native species?
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Lucas Machias
Lucas Machias Sandra Anagnostakis BTW the guy in Idaho says he is sending samples from the 100 ft suspected dentata. Also, have Canadians sent samples to you ok?
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Erik Carlson
Erik Carlson This sounds really unique. I hope we can get updates once we know more about it.
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Sandra Anagnostakis
Sandra Anagnostakis Lucas Machias Yes, I think there are more native U.S. species, and who knows what is still in western China!
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Lucas
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Re: Big Ozark chinquapin

Post by Lucas » Tue Jun 25, 2019 2:35 pm

Lots of talk about this on the web

Genome-wide sequence-based genotyping supports a nonhybrid origin of Castanea alabamensis
Matthew Taylor Perkins, Tetyana Zhebentyayeva, Paul H. Sisco, J Hill Craddock

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/680371v1

The trees above may be this new one.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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