New Growth as Impressionist Painting

Accounts of times in which someone has had a spiritual momment or felt they were communing or were one with nature. Experiences that elicited a strong emotional response or moment of gestalt.

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edniz
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Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 8:12 am

New Growth as Impressionist Painting

Post by edniz » Mon Apr 19, 2010 11:14 am

As the woods fills out with new growth, I have been experiencing a different type of impression over the last few years. There is a particular period of time when the hillsides transform themselves into an impressionistic painting. First come the splotches of red from the red maples. Next is the iridescent quality of the first poplar leaves. When these two trees reach their peak of this quality, this is when I imagine Monet, Renoir or Cezanne working on a canvas that is more like a half mile high and two miles long. It’s quite a rush.
For those of you who know the woods better than I, are there other trees or greenery that enhance or add to this effect?

Ed Nizalowski
Newark Valley, NY

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James Parton
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Re: New Growth as Impressionist Painting

Post by James Parton » Mon Apr 19, 2010 3:49 pm

Ed N,

Willows with their new bright green leaves. Imagine one, maybe a weeping willow over a stream. Also the flowering of serviceberry in the early spring.

James
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

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dbhguru
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Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: New Growth as Impressionist Painting

Post by dbhguru » Thu Apr 22, 2010 2:30 pm

ENTS,

New growth as impressionist painting is a fascinating topic. I find that there are points when new species bloom or leaf out that the woods take on a surreal look. The mixing of subtle hues can look almost artificial. Yet, real they are. I'm looking out my window observing 5 or 6 shades of green. Greens mixed with browns with the off white of the shadbush is far more pleasing to me that the splashes of intense color from planted ornamentals.

Regardless of whether native or ornamental, I guess spring is truly the artist's most promising season. The feel of new life abounds. Optimism rises. Light grows more intense. Then the bugs start biting. Ugh, the fall from grace.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Steve Galehouse
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Re: New Growth as Impressionist Painting

Post by Steve Galehouse » Sat Apr 24, 2010 10:42 pm

edniz wrote:As the woods fills out with new growth, I have been experiencing a different type of impression over the last few years. There is a particular period of time when the hillsides transform themselves into an impressionistic painting. First come the splotches of red from the red maples. Next is the iridescent quality of the first poplar leaves. When these two trees reach their peak of this quality, this is when I imagine Monet, Renoir or Cezanne working on a canvas that is more like a half mile high and two miles long. It’s quite a rush.
For those of you who know the woods better than I, are there other trees or greenery that enhance or add to this effect?

Ed Nizalowski
Newark Valley, NY
Ed-

I had the same experience last week while driving along a highway, looking at the trees breaking bud. There was a stretch of road where dots of red color blended with moss green and Kelly green( red maple, oak, and sugar maple?), like a pointillist painting by Georges Seurat.

Steve
every plant is native somewhere

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