Grand Tetons, Part 2

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Don
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Re: Grand Tetons, Part 2

Post by Don » Fri Aug 05, 2011 11:17 am

Bob-
If my recall serves me, the requested images were taken from the trailhead, upon our return?
Here are a series of images, taken from the trailhead (first one features Monica fresh from a grueling 4 hour hike)...
DSC00434.JPG
DSC00435.JPG
another cropped tighter...
DSC00436.JPG
and while the waterfall is missing, zooming closer...
DSC00437.JPG
and reaching the limits of my camera's zoom capabilities...
DSC00438.JPG
As Bob has posted, this area deserves further attention as there is so much to see. And from so many viewpoints. And with such different lighting during the passing of the day. And they're so right-in-your-face that it's hard to not be intimidated by them. A wonderful place!

Now having said that, everybody but ENTS and WNTS, stay away! Don't come here, it's ugly!
:>)
Don
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dbhguru
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Re: Grand Tetons, Part 2

Post by dbhguru » Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:55 pm

Don,

Pretty funny. Yes, all you outsiders, it is ugly as sin. Don't come! To our esteemed NTS members, it is GREAAT! Come join us.

NTS,

The location of Don's pictures is the trailhead into the high country - the Lupine Meadows Trail. The trail is used by climbers to access the Grand Teton, itself. The peak in the picture is Mount Teewinot, a 12,325-foot summit that begins immediately where the Snake River flood plain ends. The mountain has absolutely no foothills. The vertical rise of Teewinot is around 5,700 feet, as measured from the Snake River. From the trailhead, where we were, the rise is about 5,300 feet. Because the rise occurs so abruptly, it is sometimes hard for the eye to gauge what is being looked at. The brain has to make many connections and interpretations. The impact is dramatic, though, and is what makes the Tetons so visually stunning to people, both from a distance and up close. The latest assessment of the age of the uplift is between 6 and 9 million years, making the Tetons the youngest range in the Rockies, and one of the youngest mountain ranges on the planet. That bit of geological news is exciting for us mountain aficionados who judge mountains by many criteria, but youth, height, and ruggedness almost always score high. Here is a view of the Teton uplift using progressive settings of the telephoto lens on my Coolpix 5400. These images were all taken in 2010.

First a map that shows the elevation of the Snake River.
GT-Map.jpg
Now for the distant view from the Snake River flood plain. The line of trees marks the Snake River's path.
GT-FarAway.jpg
Now, we move in through a succession of settings.
GT-Closer.jpg
GT-StillCloser.jpg
GT-VeryClose.jpg
Here is the Grand and Teewinot being featured. Teewinot is to the right. The Grand is unmistakable. Its rise from the Snake is 13,775 - 6,600 = 7,375 feet, give or take a few feet.
GT-Teewinot.jpg
A look at massive 12,605-foot Mount Moran, named for artist Thomas Moran. Moran has the largest of the shrinking mountain glaciers in the Tetons.
GT-MountMoran.jpg
And finally, some Arrow Leaf Balsam Root that was in its last stages when the picture was taken.
GT-BalsamRoot.jpg
Bob
Robert T. Leverett
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Co-founder and President
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Co-founder, National Cadre

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Grand Tetons, Part 2

Post by Larry Tucei » Fri Aug 05, 2011 1:24 pm

Bob and Don, Geezeeeee, what an ugly place! You guys are right I don't think I'd ever want to visit a place like that- cause I'd never want to leave it! Larry

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James Parton
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Re: Grand Tetons, Part 2

Post by James Parton » Sat Aug 06, 2011 12:18 am

Don and Bob,

Geez. You guys make me jealous...
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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Grand Tetons, Part 2

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Sat Aug 06, 2011 5:20 pm

I was amazed by the Tetons. But when I got over to the Absarokas, I was even more impressed with them than I was with the Tetons. I think it's because the Tetons are so relatively compact, whereas the Absarokas just go on and on and on. You never see the end of them!

Doesn't Grand Teton stand over 7,000 vertical feet above its base? I was stunned. Me and my tiny family just stood there on Jenny Lake looking up at it...it's very hard to realize just how huge it is and how small we are.


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dbhguru
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Re: Grand Tetons, Part 2

Post by dbhguru » Sat Aug 06, 2011 8:05 pm

Robert,

Yes, the Snake River's elevation is around 6,600 feet due east of the Grand. The rise from the Snake is just under 7,200 feet. From overlooks along the road, the elevation change is right at 7,000 feet. The closer you get, the more neck-bending it becomes, as you obviously know.

I agree, the Absorakas are extremely impressive, and as you observe, go on and on and on. The highest point in the Absorakas is Francs Peak at about 13,153, if I recall. Wyoming has 4 ranges with Thirteeners: the Wind Rivers, The Big Horns, The Tetons, and the Absorakas. The grizzly has returned to the northern Wind Rivers and to the Absorakas. Because the Big Horns are isolated, no grizzlies there yet. We saw 5 grizzlies while in the Tetons. A record for us.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Grand Tetons, Part 2

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Sun Aug 07, 2011 11:22 am

We only saw one bear in the Tetons, a brown-phase black bear. Although it came within thirty feet of us, we never saw its head because it was grazing so intently on something in the shrubbery beneath the pines that it never looked up! It was just moving along like a big vacuum cleaner. I have no idea what it was eating, but it must have been pretty good stuff.


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Click on image to see its original size

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Grand Tetons, Part 2

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Sun Aug 07, 2011 12:14 pm

And a little more Tetons eye candy:



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Jove, how we hated to leave that place. Driving away that last day was painful.

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