Grand Tetons

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dbhguru
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Grand Tetons

Post by dbhguru » Sun Jul 03, 2011 1:01 pm

WNTS/ENTS,

It is a little past 11:00AM and I’m sitting at my daughter’s kitchen table awaiting the arrival of Michael Taylor sometime this morning or early afternoon. We’ll pick up Don Bertolette later today, and then the 2011 WNTS rendezous will officially begin. While I’m waiting, I’ll pass along some images from Monica’s and my recent visit to the Tetons in Wyoming. The first image is of a huge Englemann Spruce in Cascade Canyon near Hidden Falls. People were bypassing it without a single glance. The Park Service seems to be barely aware of it. There’s work to be done in GTNP.

I pose a question to ENTS tree measuring experts. What would you place its girth as? Its height is 120.5 feet.
image001.jpg


I measured Englemann Spruce trees in the vicinity to 131.4 feet in height. Most are 8 to 11 feet in girth, with 3 really large ones. I was not expecting this from the standpoint of trees. The Tetons don’t even make a blip on the radar scope for good western tree habitat. However, from a mountain standpoint, the Tetons are a hard act to follow. They are very young mountains, geologically speaking, the youngest range of the Rockies. According to current theory, they began forming from 6 to 9 million years ago. On their eastern side, they rise abruptly above their immediate base, which varies between 6,500 and 7,000 feet. At 13,774 feet altitude, the Grand Teton rises fully 7,000 feet above its immediate base, and about 7,300 feet above the Snake River to the East. The sudden uplift is very dramatic as viewed from Jackson Hole. The next few images show Teton scenery.
image003.jpg
image005.jpg
image007.jpg
image009.jpg
While in the Tetons, we saw 4 adult grizzlies plus two cubs. A grizzly in the wild is an intimidating sight. We also saw elk, mule deer, yellow-bellied marmots, and bison. I’ll report more as time goes on.

Bob






WNTS.docx
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Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Grand Tetons

Post by Larry Tucei » Sun Jul 03, 2011 1:05 pm

Bob, 14' Beautiful photos! A grand place to visit it's on my places to go list. Larry

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dbhguru
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Re: Grand Tetons

Post by dbhguru » Sun Jul 03, 2011 2:09 pm

Larry,

The Tetons are a trip. There are other places in the CONUS that are their equal, mountain-wise, but I can't overstate how dramatic the Tetons are from the sage flats in Jackson Hole.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Grand Tetons

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Sun Jul 03, 2011 8:58 pm

The Tetons are the most magnificent mountains I've ever seen. Hoping to get back there in a year or two. I have a two-day backpack routed.

We didn't see any grizzly bears in GTNP, and only one black (brown phase) bear. The black bear made me a tad nervous because he was so intent on eating something in the brush (I never determined what it was, but it was obviously something growing close to the ground) that he got really close to us for the simple reason that he would not lift his head up as he grazed along under the evergreens.

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edfrank
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Re: Grand Tetons

Post by edfrank » Sun Jul 03, 2011 9:17 pm

JRS wrote:
The black bear made me a tad nervous because he was so intent on eating something in the brush (I never determined what it was
Probably a hiker. Don't worry, they will make more.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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James Parton
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Re: Grand Tetons

Post by James Parton » Mon Jul 04, 2011 12:11 am

Bob,

I'll guess 14.5 to 15 ft cbh on that Englemann Spruce.

Beautiful place!
James E Parton
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dbhguru
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Re: Grand Tetons

Post by dbhguru » Mon Jul 04, 2011 8:56 am

James, Larry, et al:

I'm embarrassed to say that I forgot my D-Tape. I plan to return on Wednesday. In the interim, here are two more images. The first is of Jenny Lake and with the Tetons in the background. The second is of a stately Doug Fir on one of the trails Monica and I took. The height was slightly under 100 feet. I didn't go over and measure its girth, but would have been around 9.5 feet.
GT-JennyLake.jpg
GT-DougFir.jpg
Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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bbeduhn
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Re: Grand Tetons

Post by bbeduhn » Tue Jul 05, 2011 11:30 am

I'd go 14'3" on the Engelman spruce.

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dbhguru
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Re: Grand Tetons

Post by dbhguru » Sat Jul 09, 2011 3:07 pm

Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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