Page 1 of 1

South Ms Black Creek Wilderness Trail

Posted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 6:55 pm
by Larry Tucei
NTS----I measured several Trees at Black Creek Wilderness Trail in South Ms on Sat. Jan 2 and Monday the 4th. I concentrated on the Pines but did include two Tulip trees that were superlative for Ms they don’t get much larger than these anywhere in the State. They both grow in a moist Bottom along with many more of the same size. I measured the one in the first photo last year and posted on it along with some tall record Sweet bay Magnolia.
Tulip 1
Tulip 1
Tulip 2
Tulip 2
The first Tulip was 10’ 4” CBH and had a height to 123’ last year I got 105.5’ this time I finally hit the top. The second one about 100 yards south was 10’5” and 114’ tall. This Bottom is 300 yards off Trail and a Bushwhack to and through it.
Short Leaf Pine
Short Leaf Pine
Once through I located a nice Short Leaf Pine on the eastern Ridge 8’ 2” and 114’ tall.
Loblolly Pine
Loblolly Pine
Next on the edge of the Bottom and north 300 yards I found a very tall for this area Loblolly Pine 7’ 2” and 132’. It is the second tallest Pine I’ve found in Southern Ms.
Slash Pine
Slash Pine
Then south of the Loblolly 100 yards or so I measured a tall Slash Pine to 7’ 3” and 123’ tall. I measured many trees on this first trip but only recorded them if they were tall or large. This first Hike on Saturday was only a mile in and Monday’s Hike was much longer 4 miles. On Monday I basically did the same thing measuring many trees only recording the Superlatives.
Big Loblolly
Big Loblolly
The first tree a big Loblolly was 10’ 3” and 120’ tall. This is about the max of Cir that I have been finding in here.
Spruce Pine
Spruce Pine
Next I found a nice Spruce Pine 7’ 3’ and 121.5’ tall, my second tallest from South Ms. I did another Spruce Pine to 120.
Long Leaf Pine
Long Leaf Pine
I measured several Long Leaf Pine 106.5’, 105’, 106.5’ and the find of the day a LL to 109.5’ only 6’ 5” CBH. That is a LL Height record for me in the state. I then measured a couple more Loblolly one to 126’ and the other was 124.5’ and CBH 8’ 5”.
Big Leaf Magnolia
Big Leaf Magnolia
As I walked along the Trail I noticed several Big Leaf Magnolia trees. I measured the largest to 60’ and CBH 3’ 5” a record for me. The 130’+ Loblollies are very rare out of hundreds that I’ve seen in my 8-10 trips here only two have been to above 130. Hurricane Katrina was not kind to this area and you are just now able to get through the underbrush to reach some of the larger trees remaining. http://www.wilderness.net/NWPS/wildView?WID=54 Larry

Re: South Ms Black Creek Wilderness Trail

Posted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 11:12 pm
by Devin
Nice tulips and big leaf. Being from more northern eastern coast I really recognized the difference between the prevalence and size of poplars when I lived in MS. NWR, Tombigbee, and to some extent Delta Nat. are the only places I have seen them exceed 20" dbh down there. When you live in the mountains (and even the piedmont) they are practically weeds and you almost cringe on the site of a pure stand. You take for granted their existence along the entire east coast and it is only when you move to the deep south do their habitat and phenology become special again.

Re: South Ms Black Creek Wilderness Trail

Posted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 6:40 am
by Joe
It's nice to see big trees in the flatlands of the south. I've driven through Dixie a few times and went through once on Amtrak and never saw a big tree- what with so much of it "managed" and other areas abandoned farmland. I think that's the general impression most people have of southern forests. I can only imagine the deep south as a wilderness teeming with wildlife- and inhabited by Native Americans. Then along came the pale faces speaking with forked tongues--- to destroy it all.
Joe

Re: South Ms Black Creek Wilderness Trail

Posted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 9:16 am
by Larry Tucei
Devin- So true I'm positive many giant Tulips in pure stands were cut down during the Lumbering years of the southeastern Forests. Joe- It would have been amazing Pines to 5-6' Dia. common and Oaks to 10' Dia. common. Pure stands of Long Leaf for miles and miles. William Bartram saw it and was the first to Document them. I wish I could go back in time about 300 years to see myself. I can only imagine how spectacular and wild it must have been. Larry

Re: South Ms Black Creek Wilderness Trail

Posted: Wed Jan 13, 2016 8:06 pm
by Lucas
Larry Tucei wrote:I wish I could go back in time about 300 years to see myself. I can only imagine how spectacular and wild it must have been. Larry
http://www.tomkellyinc.net/catalog/index.php?cPath=21

http://www.tomkellyinc.net/catalog/prod ... cts_id=215

"Tom Kelly gives us more 9 more chapters, continuing the themes of his previous 21 books. In this collection Tom explores the future of the Wild Turkey, the Hunt and the Habitat, which means the timber industry to Tom. No Place to Hide, is a fine example of Tom Kelly's thought process at 88 years young."

Ever read any of Tom Kelly's turkey hunting books. He was a forest cruiser and has a lot to say about trees in his home Alabama. He has a great story on how admiring a Cherrybark almost killed him indirectly. He likes Bartram.

Your pix really add to what I saw in my mind's eye.