Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Loblolly Pines Part 1

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Larry Tucei
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Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Loblolly Pines Part 1

Post by Larry Tucei » Sat Jan 03, 2015 6:27 pm

NTS- I spent the last few days of 2014 hunting at Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge and of course measuring some trees. I concentrated on Loblolly Pine this time to locate the tallest on the Refuge. I want to especially thank Jess Riddle for the Lidar he supplied me, man what a difference that can make. Green Tree #1 is where I spent my three days hunting which is in the North East portion of the Refuge. I’ll start with a Pine right next to the Levee that transverse's the area. The Levee is approx. one mile in length and in the shape of a fish hook. Created for Duck hunting to capture and hold water in the timber creating Duck Habitat. Here is an image looking south at the entrance to the Levee it almost shows the Pine but not quite.
Levee 2 .jpg
I named it the Levee Pine and it is right next to the left side and down about 1100 yards, funny thing is I've been looking at this tree for a few years and new it was large but never measured it. Wow! It turns out to be the largest CBH of a Pine I've ever measured in the state at 12' 7" and with a height 127'. The thing that is most impressive about this Pine was at 50' it's still 4' Dia. Here are a few images of the Whopper.
Levee Pine 1.jpg
Levee Pine 2.jpg
Levee Pine 3.jpg
Levee 1 .jpg
Another image of the Levee at the Pine looking west where the levee turns. I'm hunting on the right side of the image down about 500 yards and in 100. I got a Doe on Tuesday morning and the trick is carting the Deer out the 1600 yards as no vehicles or 4 wheeler's are allowed past the gate. The following morning I went a few miles North West in search of some 140 footers located by Lidar. I searched for a few hours with no success and will return in a couple of weeks and find those. On the way back to the evening hunt I stopped on Bluff Lake Road between two Bridges that cross the Noxubee River where Lidar detected a 140' hit just east of the roadway.
Noxubee Bridge Pine 1.jpg
Noxubee Bridge Pine 2.jpg
I found the tree not 50 yards from the road and it is the tallest Loblolly that I have measured to date at 143.5', CBH of 7' 9.5" and Spread of 39' x 46.5'. N 33 17.401 W 88 46.514 Larry
Last edited by Larry Tucei on Fri Aug 19, 2016 1:41 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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dbhguru
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Re: Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Loblolly Pines Part 1

Post by dbhguru » Sat Jan 03, 2015 7:47 pm

Larry,

Congratulations. Loblollies are to the deep South as white pines are to the Northeast.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Loblolly Pines Part 1

Post by Larry Tucei » Sat Jan 03, 2015 9:03 pm

Bob- Thanks, you are so right. I think I'm going to start putting together a listing on Loblollies similar to your White Pine. I have quite a collection and need to put in on paper. :) Larry

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Jess Riddle
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Re: Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Loblolly Pines Part 1

Post by Jess Riddle » Sun Jan 04, 2015 4:20 pm

Larry,

That massive pine has a massive crown to match. Looks like the clearing for the levee is helping the tree retain branches and providing extra light to fuel growth.

Seems like Noxubee has a shot at having five species over 140'. Cherrybark, sweetgum, and now loblolly are confirmed, sycamore seems highly likely, and swamp chestnut oak is a definite possibility.

Jess

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Chris
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Re: Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Loblolly Pines Part 1

Post by Chris » Mon Jan 05, 2015 11:34 pm

That is quite a Loblolly!

So evidently the largest Loblolly in Mississippi is 15' 11" CBH and 124' tall and is located in the county. Do we know if it is on the refuge?

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gnmcmartin
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Re: Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Loblolly Pines Part 1

Post by gnmcmartin » Tue Jan 06, 2015 11:20 am

Larry:

Thanks for your reports on these loblollies. I have slowly begun to develop an interest and appreciation for loblolly pines. Yes, they are to some extent to the south what white pines are in the north, but the south has other fine "hard" pine trees, including shortleaf--the most hardy, Slash--which has the hardest and heaviest wood, and longleaf--which grows with the most perfect form, and thus is favored for poles. But loblolly grows the largest of these four, and is the most common.

But, I have to admit, I have never seen anything like the best white pines, nor have I seen anything like the best loblollies. But here north or Winchester, VA, I have been planting both, in about equal numbers--about 250 of each, and from different seed sources to ensure diversity. White pine is native here, but we are too dry to get very good growth. There may be a 90 footer around somewhere, but I am not sure I have seen it. Loblolly is not native this far north, but they can be grown here, and they grow about as well as the white pines.

As for my plantings here, the loblollies can, with some careful weeding and watering, get a very fast start. Unlike white pines, they can put out several growth flushes in a season--occasionally as many as four. Many of the 6 to 8 inch seedlings I planted two years ago are two feet tall after one year, and between 4 and 5' feet the second, and then they grow somewhat faster. I enjoy tending to my little trees and watching them grow.

--Gaines

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Loblolly Pines Part 1

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Jan 06, 2015 8:47 pm

Chris- I don't think it is in the Refuge it would be noted on the listing. Noxubee NWR is located in three different counties, Noxubee, Oktibbeha, and Winston Counties. Gaines- Thank you for your kind words. Loblolly was planted back in many areas in Ms, and other area's in the South after the great clear cutting that took place in the early 1900's for its rapid growth rates. I have measured some large and tall Slash Pines in Bienville NF in Central Ms., they also have some large Loblolly and Longleaf. Our Coastal region has all three species and the LL being the shortest and of course the slowest growing. Foresters down this way are re-thinking the mistake of not planting more LL back after cutting for they hold up much better in Hurricane prone areas. I'll measure some Slash and LL the next time I get in one of the areas that contain them.

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