Southern Red Cedar?

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Jimmy McDonald
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Southern Red Cedar?

Post by Jimmy McDonald » Mon Mar 29, 2010 6:22 pm

I saw this tree about a month ago while riding my bike around Ocean Springs and I knew I had to come back and measure it. I've been living in Ocean Springs for a couple of months now and have been impressed with the trees in down here. Tons of huge live oaks.

The tree I measured today was a southern Red Cedar I think but I'm not really sure. Its an old looking bulbous tree thats been sawed at quite a bit.

Cbh-17'8" ht-32' acs-26
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James Parton
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Re: Southern Red Cedar?

Post by James Parton » Mon Mar 29, 2010 6:30 pm

My goodness, what a bulbous old fellow. It really has character.
James E Parton
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Larry Tucei
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Re: Southern Red Cedar?

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Mar 30, 2010 8:30 am

Jimmy, I'm not sure if that is an Eastern Red Cedar or a Southern Red Cedar. I've been meaning to measure it for years. Glad to see you measure it. The Hurricanes we have had in the past have not been kind to this tree. It is one of the largest Cedars in Jackson Co. The top blew out in one of the past storms, still and impressive tree. Check out the Live Oak on Ruskin Ave., its very close to where the cedar is. Up Jackson Ave., left on Russell, left on Ruskin the tree is on the right side near where the road ends. One of the largest Live Oaks in Ocean Springs. I measured it back in 06. http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldt ... e_oaks.htm Larry

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Marcboston
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Re: Southern Red Cedar?

Post by Marcboston » Tue Mar 30, 2010 8:35 am

Excellent looking tree! Looks like a big ole turnip. Please confirm if it is a Eastern Red Cedar.

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Jess Riddle
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Re: Southern Red Cedar?

Post by Jess Riddle » Tue Mar 30, 2010 10:19 pm

Jimmy,

That tree is huge for a juniper in the eastern US. Too bad half the crown's gone.

Eastern red cedar does not grow right along the coast, so unless the tree was planted, it must be a southern red cedar. It would be great to confirm that with some foliage so that we can add the tree to the max list. How did you measure the height?

Jess

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Zachary S
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Re: Southern Red Cedar?

Post by Zachary S » Tue Apr 13, 2010 5:01 pm

Jimmy,

Late comment, but, GOOD LORD! I have never seen a redcedar quite like that. One must wonder what it looked like before the crown was cut out. That's an impressive tree for any species (except, of course, for live oak) so close to the road in a coastal town.

~Zac

Jimmy McDonald
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Re: Southern Red Cedar?

Post by Jimmy McDonald » Sun May 02, 2010 11:23 pm

I went back and looked at this tree to confirm species. I went with my National Audubon Society Field Gudie to North American Trees, I'm gonna go ahead and confirm this as a Southern Red Cedar. I took the smallest possibel girth I could find because it was so misshapen. I'm still kind of in the dark ages of height measurement because I use the stick to eye method. I don't have any spare money and buying proper height tools is low on my list right now. I'm not sure if a clinometer would be a good investment? they would be cheaper than lasers but I've heard some mixed reviews on them.

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edfrank
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Re: Southern Red Cedar?

Post by edfrank » Mon May 03, 2010 9:38 am

Jimmy,

It is an impressive tree. For ones with odd bases like this the best you can do is still a compromise when measuring girth. At what height did you measure the girth? You should measure the girth at the narrowest point and note the hieght of measurement. Then add a note to the description about the burly and bulbous natire of teh trunk. You basicaly did this with the photos. I understand the lack of money. Your documentation of trees by locating them, phtographing them, and measuring their girth is still a worthwhile contribiution to the effort. You could try some crown spread measurements on trees that you find where possible. That can be done with a tape.

Thirty two feet seems a reasonable estimate, maybe a little taller. I am estimating from your hieght and the height of the tree on the photo. The top isn't shown, so I am not sure. You can make a roungh estimate from measuring the height os a person in pixels on a photo ( or the height of something of known height - stick, flag on the tree, etc at the trunk surface) and then measuring the height of the tree in pixels on the same photo. The photo needs to be taken from a good distance so that the perspective is as undistorted as possible and so that the top of the tree can be seen. This doesn't replace a laser measurement, but can be used to see if the stick measurements are in the right ball park.

Neat tree.

Ed Frank
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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