Bienville National Forest-Tallahala Wildlife Mgt Area

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Larry Tucei
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Bienville National Forest-Tallahala Wildlife Mgt Area

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Dec 13, 2011 1:41 pm

NTS,

I went to Bienville National Forest this weekend for some tree measuring and Deer hunting. Bienville contains 178,000 acres in central Ms., and is a very diverse area. Stately Pines abound here growing mostly on the high ground with mixed Hardwoods along the many Rivers and Creeks Bottoms. Three Wildlife Mgt Areas are located here, Caney Creek, Bienville and Tallahala. I like Tallahala and stayed there for two nights in a tent. Primitive camping is fun but challenging. I did all my measuring in and around the Cedar Creek area basically the central area of Tallahala. Three Creeks flow through the area, Tallahala, Cedar and Quarterlieh. Tallahala contains 28,000 acres of trees and most of them are in the 100-120’ range with a few in the 130’ class. These trees are all around 80 years old with a few exceptions. Not bad heights and Cir., for such young Timber.

I measured the following species- Slash Pine, Spruce Pine, Water Oak, Overcup Oak, Nuttall Oak, Shumard Red Oak, Turkey or Black Oak, Swamp Chestnut Oak, Willow Oak, Sweet gum, Water Hickory, Shagbark Hickory, and Ash. Most of these trees were in the 120’ range with the finds of the day a 135’ Shumard, a best for me and a 135’ Nuttall, another best. I meandered along and around the creek for two days and without a compass and GPS forget it. It’s too hard to navigate this area without them. It’s only ½ mile to the Creek but when you zig zag as we all do when tree hunting it’s easy to get turned around. Some photos of one of my favorite areas in the State of Mississippi.

Spruce Pine- 9’ 3” 126’ ,
Slash Pine- 9’ 9’ 126’,
Willow Oak-12’ 3” 123’ ,
Cherrybark oak-9’ 7” 123’,
Shumard Oak-11’ 3’ 135’,
Turkey, Black Oak?-9’ 105’,
Swamp Chestnut Oak-10’ 108’,
Water Oak-9’ 6” 120’,
Overcup Oak-10’ 4” 121’,
Nuttall Oak-10’ 3” 135’,
Sweetgum-6’ 6” 102’,
Water Hickory-6’ 7” 123’,
Shagbark Hickory-6' 7" 123', and
Ash-10’ 120’.

Rucker 10 Tallest Trees- 125’

http://www.fs.fed.us/outernet/r8/missis ... index.html
Attachments
Cedar Creek
Cedar Creek
Spruce Pines
Spruce Pines
Sharbark Hickory
Sharbark Hickory
Spruce Pine
Spruce Pine
Slash Pine
Slash Pine
Slash Pine
Slash Pine
Willow Oak
Willow Oak
Willow Oak
Willow Oak
Shumard Oak
Shumard Oak
Shumard Oak
Shumard Oak
Water Oak
Water Oak
Water Oak
Water Oak
Overcup Oak
Overcup Oak
Overcup Oak
Overcup Oak
Nuttall Oak
Nuttall Oak
Nuttall Oak
Nuttall Oak
Water Hickory
Water Hickory
Water Hickory
Water Hickory
Ash
Ash
Ash
Ash
Last edited by Larry Tucei on Thu Dec 15, 2011 11:59 am, edited 2 times in total.

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dbhguru
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Re: Bienville National Forest-Tallahala Wildlife Mgt Area

Post by dbhguru » Tue Dec 13, 2011 2:01 pm

Larry,

Absolutely outstanding. I've been curious about Bienville for years. I have a book that shows very impressive looking sweetgums. I think the book calls them red gums. Of course the source gave no information about them. No surprise there.

I know you've posted in the past on Biebville, but this post really puts the location into perspective. You are right, those are impressive numbers for 80-year old trees. Did you get a deer?

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

RyanLeClair
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Re: Bienville National Forest-Tallahala Wildlife Mgt Area

Post by RyanLeClair » Tue Dec 13, 2011 2:01 pm

Awesome, Larry! I love your Southern Adventures. My family is thinking about coming down to your neck of the woods sometime.

P.S., you're hunting with a black powder gun I think?

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Bienville National Forest-Tallahala Wildlife Mgt Area

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Dec 13, 2011 2:22 pm

Bob, The Sweetgum is plentiful there but I can find none over 100-110'. I think if I went just for that species I could locate some taller. Tallahala is really a special place. The Forest Service has stopped clearcutting and now only select cutting. I hope that continues from now one. Thousands of acres have been cut and it will never be what it once was. The Spruce Pine, Slash Pine, Cherrybark Oak, Shumard Oak, Pin Oak, Water Oak, Water Hickory, Nuttall Oak and Mockernut Hickory are all new height records for species I've measured in Ms. I plan on returning later this year and I'll do a more indepth Sweetgum search. Just for you Bob! No Deer then, but I spent more time tree hunting that deer hunting. I'll go back soon and kill one. I went to Wisconsin in Nov., and killed two Does. I was hunting a 160 class Buck for non hunters that's big. Ryan, It's a 50 Cal. and surprisingly accurate out to 100 yards. Most people use 45/70's now, I still use the ole blackpowder. Larry

RyanLeClair
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Re: Bienville National Forest-Tallahala Wildlife Mgt Area

Post by RyanLeClair » Tue Dec 13, 2011 3:51 pm

That's neat, Larry. I don't know much about guns, I just remember when my buddy bought a muzzleloader in PA. Apparently muzzleloaders aren't considered to be real firearms under federal law, so my friend was able to buy the gun without doing any paperwork. I thought that was funny.

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Will Blozan
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Re: Bienville National Forest-Tallahala Wildlife Mgt Area

Post by Will Blozan » Tue Dec 13, 2011 6:43 pm

Larry,

Great stuff! I LOVE spruce pine- what a treat to see.

I do question the ID on the white oak. It doesn't look quite right. Also, the mockernut looks like a green ash???

Send some venison!

Will

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Bienville National Forest-Tallahala Wildlife Mgt Area

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Dec 13, 2011 9:51 pm

Will, You know I was thinking Ash but I wasn't sure. I saw several species that I'm not 100 percent on, sometimes the bark can be deceptive. You have a good eye,I think that's a Overcup and not a White. Sometimes in the field it's difficult to get a exact ID. Practice makes perfect, I need to stay in the Forest more. Central Ms., is loaded with tall Spruce Pines, they have always been a favorite tree of mine. One big one fell in a recent blowdown and I gathered some cones for seed. I'm going to try and grow a few. I'll see what I can do about the Venison. Larry

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ElijahW
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Re: Bienville National Forest-Tallahala Wildlife Mgt Area

Post by ElijahW » Wed Dec 14, 2011 3:51 pm

Larry,

Great report. Your accounts always come through with much more than a hint of enthusiasm. Mississippi must be an incredibly diverse place, tree-wise; so many different varieties of oak, pine, and hickory! I haven't spent much time there myself, but hope to sometime, along with central Alabama and many other places. Thank you for your work, I thoroughly enjoy browsing through your descriptions and pictures.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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Jess Riddle
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Re: Bienville National Forest-Tallahala Wildlife Mgt Area

Post by Jess Riddle » Thu Dec 15, 2011 1:02 am

Larry,

I second all of Will's comments, and that shumard oak looks every bit of its height. I'm also a little curious about the pin oak. The standard range maps show the species not quite reaching Mississippi.

http://esp.cr.usgs.gov/data/atlas/little/

Jess

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Bienville National Forest-Tallahala Wildlife Mgt Area

Post by Larry Tucei » Thu Dec 15, 2011 9:07 am

Jess, You know It may be a Turkey Oak or Black Oak. I looked at the range map also and did notice that the Pin Oak was more north and east. Sometimes I have trouble with identifying some species. I did look at some leaves on the ground around the tree but it's still difficult to ID them. Red Oak leaves can be so similar sometimes. With the trees able to cross pollinate that doesn't help me either. Thanks for that way cool link. Elijah, I'm glad you enjoy them. I also enjoy your postings. I plan on getting out a little more this winter and will be reporting on Noxubee Natinal Wildlife Refuge located in Tombigbee NF after Christmas. I also plan a trip to Delta National Forest after that. Delta is the only Bottomland Forest in the state. Very similar to Big Oak Tree State Park in Missouri. I should get some great stuff from that place. It's reported to have some small pockets of old growth- Ash, Amerian Elm, Gum, Overcup, Nuttall, Bitter Pecan, Box Elder, Sugarberry, Red Maple and Cypress trees. Can't wait to get in there, heck maybe I'll find Bigfoot - laughing. Larry
Last edited by Larry Tucei on Sat Aug 11, 2012 8:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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