A Meaningful Dedication

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#1)  A Meaningful Dedication

Postby dbhguru » Fri Aug 18, 2017 8:42 am

Hi Ents,

  Yesterday, Ray Asselin, Jared Lockwood, myself, and Dr. Tony D'Amato met in Mohawk Trail State Forest to continue working on the old growth film that we've committed ourselves to. Tony is the most prominent of several PhD researchers who have done the scientific spadework in Mohawk. They all give me more credit than I'm due for discovery, study, and promotion of Massachusetts old growth. I could have yelled my head off but without the support of the scientific community, we would barely be off the starting blocks, and it was Tony who did the heavy scientific lifting in those scattered, difficult to reach pockets of old growth.

  On the way out of Mohawk, Tony had already left and we paused to measure a white pine near the headquarters growing among mature hardwoods, hemlocks and a scattering of white pines. Mountain laurel creates much of the understory shrubs. Using his faithful TruPulse 200X named Spiffy, Jared Lockwood set out about re-measuring the great white. I used Sparky, my faithful 200X. Jared is a very meticulous measurer who has developed measuring skill at the highest NTS and Cadre level. He simply will not give up until he has decoded the crown of a tree and found the highest leader. This is a more challenging job than many tree measurers realize. But thanks, to Jared''s persistence, we confirmed the pine at 150.5 feet. Jared got the number first, and I finally got a check on it. It becomes the 138th great white in Mohawk to reach the 150-foot height threshold. The circumference of the pine is a respectable 9.8 feet.

  We named the tree in Tony's honor. The naming is always done in the name of the Native Tree Society, which carries increasing weight among tree aficionados. Here is a look at Tony's white pine courtesy of Ray's photography skills. Oh yes, when he measures trees, he employ's Spoofy, his Nikon Forestry 500.

               
                       
The Dr Tony D'Amato Pine.JPG
                                       
               


  You can see the pine growing back in the woods with its crown well above the hardwoods. Several other pines grow to the right of Tony's pine. These are 140-footers, hardly noticeable in Mohawk.

Jared,

  Sorry to jump the gun and report on this first. I got itchy fingers. Maybe you can give more details and I'll leave the BB for you to report on at the base of Todd.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder and Executive Director
Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest

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#2)  Re: A Meaningful Dedication

Postby Larry Tucei » Fri Aug 18, 2017 12:50 pm

Bob, all-  Congrats on finding another 150 footer in Mohawk. The Saga continues-  You are well ahead of my Loblolly Pine listing with just a few reaching the 150' threshold. I will try to catch up in the future as our southern Pines grow a little faster than their counterparts.  Watch out White Pines I'm coming after you lol.    Larry

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#3)  Re: A Meaningful Dedication

Postby a_blooming_botanist » Fri Aug 18, 2017 5:16 pm

Bob,

No worries! I didn’t realize you were thinking of this forum when you asked me if I wanted to be the one to share the news. You tell the story nicely.

All,

As Ray and Tony were preparing for the video shoot, Bob and I were examining some of the tall, middle-aged and older trees at the base of the old growth boulder field area on Mount Todd. A graceful black birch at the very base of the slope caught Bob’s attention and prompted him to point it out to me. “The top’s way up there,” he told me. I had to spend a little while scrambling up, down, and around the boulder field to finally catch a glimpse of the top, but when I did it came out to an even 107’ tall! After returning to the base of the tree from my slopeside vantage point, I measured its CBH at 6.02’ and collected GPS coordinates. Into the database it goes! Have a look:

               
                       
6.02 CBH x 107 black birch MTSF - base1.jpg
                       
The black birch is in the middle of the photo.
               
               

               
                       
6.02 CBH x 107 black birch MTSF - bole1.jpg
                                       
               
               
                       
6.02 CBH x 107 black birch MTSF - looking up1.jpg
                                       
               

Below you'll see a couple additional photos of the 150.5-foot D'Amato pine that offer views from underneath the tree.

               
                       
Tony D'Amato pine - base1.jpg
                       
The reflective orange marker is placed 4.5' above mid-slope.
               
               

               
                       
Tony D'Amato pine - looking up1.jpg
                                       
               

Jared

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#4)  Re: A Meaningful Dedication

Postby dbhguru » Mon Aug 21, 2017 11:18 am

Ents,

   As a follow-up to the above, in the name of NTS, I often name trees in honor of deserving people. It's all in good fun, but not everyone buys into the practice. I certainly do not believe that a tree becomes more important because it carries the name of a person, but in a fair number of cases, naming adds a small measure of protection by communicating a tree's importance to us to those who otherwise would see it just as a tree, or think of it in purely economic terms.

   On Saturday evening I presented a slideshow program at DCR's Wachusett Mountain State Reservation visitor center. The theme was Massachusetts trees and forests that give us bragging rights. The event seemed to have gone over okay and affirmed receptivity, to at least the attendees, to the idea of trees we can be proud of. Foremost on my list were the following:

  Sunderland Sycamore - largest tree in the state and one of the two or three largest in New England

  Jake Swamp White Pine - tallest tree in New England (that we know of)

  Grandfather Pine - largest single trunk white pine in Massachusetts

  Northampton Pin Oak - largest of its species in New England

  Mohawk Trail State Forest Sugar Maple - national co-champion

 There were other trees presented at the slideshow that we can be proud of here in the Bay State. The theme that seems to resonate well is that we have such trees here in little Massachusetts despite the state's degree of deforestation in the mid-1800s.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder and Executive Director
Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest

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