Jack and the Corn Stalk

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Lucas
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Jack and the Corn Stalk

Post by Lucas » Thu May 04, 2017 12:58 pm


Click on image to see its original size

http://mobile.the-scientist.com/article ... -feet-tall

Jack and the Corn Stalk
Want to grow a 45 foot tall corn stalk? Here's how.

Record-Setting Corn Grows 45 Feet Tall
A plant breeder succeeds in growing a huge maize plant thanks to a known mutation and a few environmental tricks.

You may need to laser these soon. What would happen if this was done with one of the big bamboos?

"Dendrocalamus giganteus also known as Giant Bamboo or Dragon Bamboo is a giant tropical and subtropical clumping species native to Myanmar (Burma), Bhutan, China and Thailand. It is considered the tallest bamboo in the world."

Height 25 - 35 m
Diameter 15 - 30 cm
Growth Habit Dense Clumping
Climate Tropical - Subtropical
Hardiness -1°C
Origin Southeast Asia
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Bart Bouricius
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Re: Jack and the Corn Stalk

Post by Bart Bouricius » Thu May 04, 2017 3:12 pm

Lucas,

Not sure this corn plant is a tree, as it may not even qualify as a woody plant. The bamboo in question, I believe grows on the slope behind our house in Costa Rica, as many non native species have been planed there. The speculation about making taller bamboo seems odd, as the bamboo in question already gets over 40 meters high, and I don't see how taller bamboo than this would be especially useful. Still the story is interesting and entertaining.

Bart

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Don
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Re: Jack and the Corn Stalk

Post by Don » Thu May 04, 2017 4:25 pm

Bart-
Your post reminds me of urban construction of fairly large buildings during my time in Bangkok...they used bamboo extensively for scaffolding. I don't recall if they used standard lengths, but could see where 30-40 meter high bamboo might be of value, at least for primary structural members.
-Don
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Lucas
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Re: Jack and the Corn Stalk

Post by Lucas » Wed May 10, 2017 2:14 pm

Bart Bouricius wrote:Lucas,

Not sure this corn plant is a tree, as it may not even qualify as a woody plant. The bamboo in question, I believe grows on the slope behind our house in Costa Rica, as many non native species have been planed there. The speculation about making taller bamboo seems odd, as the bamboo in question already gets over 40 meters high, and I don't see how taller bamboo than this would be especially useful. Still the story is interesting and entertaining.

Bart
I was being facetious and half serious since bamboo may have unusual genetic potential to reach unknown heights.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Bart Bouricius
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Re: Jack and the Corn Stalk

Post by Bart Bouricius » Thu May 11, 2017 8:15 pm

I was also being facetious and half serious. several species of bamboo simply bend over and touch the ground if they reach a certain height. I would guess that a 200' giant bamboo would also do this, thus becoming shorter than the less long 40 meter bamboo, unless it is held in a structure like the corn. I would question whether using a structure to keep it vertical is Kosher, especially if you were measuring a champion bamboo. Also, do you measure the clump or a blade? What about multi stem vs. single stem? When I return to Costa Rica in August I will post a height measurement. One more thing, can grass be a tree?

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Don
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Re: Jack and the Corn Stalk

Post by Don » Thu May 11, 2017 8:48 pm

Grass with annual rings? We allow (collective we, as in American Forests) palm trees and Joshua trees, and they have no annual rings per se...
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

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View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Jack and the Corn Stalk

Post by Erik Danielsen » Fri May 12, 2017 9:51 am

Wasn't this also a point of question in discussing the giant Wax Palms? As I recall they are more properly grouped with the grasses.

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Lucas
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Re: Jack and the Corn Stalk

Post by Lucas » Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:19 pm

Lucas wrote:
Bart Bouricius wrote:Lucas,

Not sure this corn plant is a tree, as it may not even qualify as a woody plant. The bamboo in question, I believe grows on the slope behind our house in Costa Rica, as many non native species have been planed there. The speculation about making taller bamboo seems odd, as the bamboo in question already gets over 40 meters high, and I don't see how taller bamboo than this would be especially useful. Still the story is interesting and entertaining.

Bart
I was being facetious and half serious since bamboo may have unusual genetic potential to reach unknown heights.

Click on image to see its original size

"The largest timber Bamboo. About 30 Meters in height & about 1 foot in diameter."

Some potential there.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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edfrank
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Re: Jack and the Corn Stalk

Post by edfrank » Thu Sep 20, 2018 11:02 pm

We actually have discussed this before and the general consensus was that for our measurement purposes anything that grew to tree size (15 feet) or has members of the species that grow to tree size would be fair game for measuring. Bamboo, palm trees, saguaro cactus and the like are not self supporting woody plants but I think they are fair game to be considered for the Native Tree Society.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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