The Prehistoric Plant Composition of Vero Beach Fossil Site

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samson'sseed
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The Prehistoric Plant Composition of Vero Beach Fossil Site

Post by samson'sseed » Thu Jun 05, 2014 7:52 am

I found an article written in 1915 about plant remains found from the Vero Beach Fossil Site. Now, I can't find the direct link back to this article, but I have written an essay about it.

http://markgelbart.wordpress.com/2014/0 ... ssil-site/

The most common tree was swamp laurel oak. Surprisingly, the environment in this part of Florida has changed little since 14,000 BP.

The only extralimital species listed was willow oak which occurs in south Georgia but no longer does in central Florida.

I did find 1 confusing listing in this paper--Pinus caribaea. I'm pretty sure Carribbean pine didn't naturally occur in this part of Florida in 1915...it's not on any of the range maps. However, the author of the original paper said it did.

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Larry Tucei
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Re: The Prehistoric Plant Composition of Vero Beach Fossil S

Post by Larry Tucei » Wed Jun 11, 2014 4:01 pm

Interesting article. No Longleaf pine metioned in the article- strange! Larry

samson'sseed
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Re: The Prehistoric Plant Composition of Vero Beach Fossil S

Post by samson'sseed » Sat Jun 14, 2014 8:15 am

The site was originally a river bottomland where longleaf pine normally doesn't grow.

I still can't figure out which species he meant by Pinus caribaea.

I'm pretty sure he didn't have it confused with Pinus palustris because Bartram used that scientific name centuries beforehand.

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canada yew
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Re: The Prehistoric Plant Composition of Vero Beach Fossil S

Post by canada yew » Sun Dec 07, 2014 2:05 pm

the pinus caribea being mentioned does make sense though.... When you think about extinct bird species and native peoples which once lived in the area...Apparently, flamingoes were once found in the area. According to early naturalist reports....and also the Carolina Parakeet too...Birds are always spreading seed around...And the Indians were known for being forest managers as well...(although we still don't really give them true credit for it)..They were known to introduce plants to various areas where they would grow and prosper..The Kentucky Coffee In Wisc. is once such as example as well as Mulberry...
Canada Yew

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Bart Bouricius
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Re: The Prehistoric Plant Composition of Vero Beach Fossil S

Post by Bart Bouricius » Mon Dec 08, 2014 9:06 am

Odd also that Pinus caribea which only has one synonym Pinus hondurensis or variety hondurensis, would have been mistaken for another tree. However, as Larry seems to suggest?, possibly Longleaf Pine was thought to be Caribbean Pine, which can have needles in excess of 25 cm. Possibly the fossils were not of the highest quality. Otherwise, since the Caribbean Pine is native to Cuba as well as Central America and Mexico, it could easily have been brought to Florida by indigenous people, and later burned out, by intentional or natural fires, as it's major limiting range factor is said to be "wild fire" (Wikipedia). Just random speculation.

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