St Andrews State Park.

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James Parton
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St Andrews State Park.

Post by James Parton » Mon Jul 05, 2010 10:43 pm

ENTS,

Monday a week ago my wife and I drove over to St. Andrews State Park which proved to be a very nice area just outside of Panama City Beach, about 4 miles from our condo. Here I became aquainted with Sand and Slash pine for the first time and enjoyed a nice little hike around Gator Lake. I did not see any gators though, dang-it. It really strikes me on how much different the forests are here. Slash and Sand Pine ( And probably a little Longleaf too ) replace my familiar White, Pitch and Virginia pine forests back home. Small twisted Live Oaks with Palmetto are found here too. And then there is the Spanish Moss. It's beautiful. I stopped a little too often for Joy who was swatting bugs. The trees on the Gator Lake trail were labeled, helping aid me in my identification. Sand Pine somewhat resembles Virginia Pine in which it is related but it has slightly larger bark plates that dont quite fuze smooth at the higher tops of the trees as Virginia Pine does.

Later we took a boat to Shell Island which is just off the shipping channel. The beach there was much less crouded than the main beach of Panama City. I wanted to explore inland on the island but rain cut us short. Heck, I even met Mr. Crabs on Shell Island! I did not see Spongebob or Patrick though. Maybe next time.

More to come!

James
Attachments
Swampy Area.jpg
Live Oaks & Palmetto.jpg
Live Oaks Near Gator Lake.JPG
Me checking out Sand Pine!.JPG
Me checking out Sand Pine!.JPG (58.12 KiB) Viewed 1735 times
Sand Pine.jpg
Sand Pine.jpg (54.77 KiB) Viewed 1735 times
Sand Pine Needles.jpg
Slash Pine.jpg
Slash Pine2.jpg
Slash Pine2.jpg (45.48 KiB) Viewed 1735 times
Mr. Crabs!.JPG
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
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New Order of Druids

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aniftychic
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Re: St Andrews State Park.

Post by aniftychic » Tue Jul 06, 2010 7:47 am

Love the pics. The bugs here in Florida are very bad. Next time you come get a thermocell. I use to work for Florida Fish and Game and worked outside day and night. The thermocell was your best bet against bugs. I still use it when I go camping.

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Larry Tucei
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Re: St Andrews State Park.

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Jul 06, 2010 9:40 am

James, St. Andrews State Park is one of may favorite places to snorkle. Good photos. Glad to see you found some slash. Those Costal Live Oaks are really twisted. Larry

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James Parton
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Re: St Andrews State Park.

Post by James Parton » Tue Jul 06, 2010 10:55 am

Larry,

It seems like they had them listed as Sand Live Oak? A subspecies maybe?

JP
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
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New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

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James Parton
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Re: St Andrews State Park.

Post by James Parton » Thu Jul 08, 2010 9:59 am

Larry, ENTS

The small twisted Live Oaks in St. Andrews State Park were listed as Sand Live Oak, a different variety of Live Oak from the typical large Southern Live Oak. Most list it as a subspecies of Quercus Virginiana but this is sometimes debated and the tree has been given a different scientific name, Quercus Geminata. Larry, have you ever studied these trees as part of your Live Oak Project? True, I don't think you'll find one 20 feet in girth. They are often associated with Sand Pine in which St. Andrews has an abundance of.

http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu/4h/Sand_live_oak/sandlive.htm

http://www.duke.edu/~cwcook/trees/quge.html

James
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
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Larry Tucei
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Re: St Andrews State Park.

Post by Larry Tucei » Thu Jul 08, 2010 8:01 pm

James, I read about them and some other Live Oak sub species a couple of years ago. This profusion of common names partly reflects an ongoing controversy about the classification of various live oaks, in particular its near relatives among the white oaks (Quercus subgenus
Subgenus
In biology, a subgenus is a taxonomic rank directly below genus. See rank and rank .In zoology, a subgeneric name can be used independently or included in a species name, in parentheses, placed between the generic and specific name: e.g...

Quercus, section Quercus). Some authors recognize as distinct species forms that others consider to be varieties of Quercus virginiana. Notably, the following two taxa, treated as species in the Flora of North America, are treated as varieties of Southern live oak by the United States Forest Service
United States Forest Service
The United States Forest Service is an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture that administers the nation's 155 national forests and 20 national grasslands, which encompass 193 million acres...

: the Texas live oak
Texas live oak
Quercus fusiformis , commonly known as Texas Live Oak, is an evergreen or nearly evergreen tree native to the southern United States...

, Quercus fusiformis (a.k.a. Q. virginiana var. fusiformis) and
the Sand live oak, Quercus geminata (a.k.a. Q. virginiana var. geminata).

Matters are further complicated by the fact that Southern live oak hybridizes with both the above two species, and also with dwarf live oak (Q. minima), swamp white oak
Swamp White Oak
The Swamp White Oak , is a species of oak in the white oak section Quercus section Quercus, primarily found in the Midwestern and Eastern Seaboard regions of North America, from southernmost Quebec and southern Maine west to eastern Kansas. It is rare south of the Ohio River...

(Q. bicolor), Durand oak (Q. durandi), overcup oak
Overcup Oak
Quercus lyrata is an oak in the white oak group . It is native to lowland wetlands in the southeastern United States, from Delaware and southern Illinois south to northern Florida and southeast Texas....

(Q. lyrata), bur oak
Bur oak
The Quercus macrocarpa or Bur Oak, sometimes spelled Burr Oak, is a species of oak in the white oak section Quercus sect. Quercus, native to North America in the eastern and midwestern United States and south-central Canada...

(Q. macrocarpa), and post oak
Post oak
Quercus stellata is an oak in the white oak group. It is a small tree, typically 10–15 m tall and 30–60 cm trunk diameter, though occasional specimens reach 30 m tall and 140 cm diameter. It is native to the eastern United States, from Connecticut in the northeast, west to southern Iowa, southwest...

(Q. stellata). Larry

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James Parton
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Re: St Andrews State Park.

Post by James Parton » Wed Jul 14, 2010 11:41 pm

Aniftychic,

I just looked the themacell up online. It looks like it would be effective. I wonder just how effective it would be on a bug filled evening night-fishing?

Thanks for the advice.

James
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
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New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

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