LiDAR search reveals tallest pine tree on Earth

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#11)  Re: LiDAR search reveals tallest pine tree on Earth

Postby Mark Collins » Sun Apr 30, 2017 7:34 pm

Congrats again Michael and Zane!

Michael, just curious, how is the forest looking in the Sierra now that the drought is over? Do you think the big pines that survived the dry spell will continue to do so, or is it still too early to tell?

Bob, any predictions as to what the third era of discovery will look like?!
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#12)  Re: LiDAR search reveals tallest pine tree on Earth

Postby M.W.Taylor » Sun Apr 30, 2017 9:43 pm

[quote="Mark Collins"]Congrats again Michael and Zane!

Michael, just curious, how is the forest looking in the Sierra now that the drought is over? Do you think the big pines that survived the dry spell will continue to do so, or is it still too early to tell?



Mark,  The big ponderosa mostly survived. A few big ones lost their tops but overall they appear healthy. The big sugar pine has have not done as well. All of of the largest known died in the last 10 years. Blister rust is taking down what the drought weakened. This may be more a problem than the drought, which has been greatly subsided by the record rainfall of this year.
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#13)  Re: LiDAR search reveals tallest pine tree on Earth

Postby dbhguru » Mon May 01, 2017 1:42 pm

Michael,

  Do you have coverage for New England? If so, I'd be interested in sites with 150-footers. In Massachusetts, we have 150-footers in 10 to 12 sites depending on how much geographical separation we require to proclaim a new site. We need some rules of the road.

   With respect to the Smokies, in many of the lower coves, 160s are abundant. I don't have a figure in mind as to how many trees in the Smokies there are over 160 feet. A wild guess is between 1,000 and 2,000, and probably closer to the latter. If Will Blozan happens to be following this post, his estimate would be far better than mine. In the past, we sought to quantify the number of tall tree sites in the Smokies, but again, we had no geographical separation criteria to apply. I think Will's last assessment was that there were hundreds of 170s being almost all tuliptree.

   Peak baggers have a pretty elaborate system for identifying separate peaks in their counts. They use geographical prominence and linear separation. I would think that we could devise a system for defining separate sites for counting trees. Who's interested in devising a criteria?

Bob
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#14)  Re: LiDAR search reveals tallest pine tree on Earth

Postby Larry Tucei » Mon May 01, 2017 3:19 pm

Michael-   Congratulations on the Ponderosa find that's amazing!  Larry
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#15)  Re: LiDAR search reveals tallest pine tree on Earth

Postby ElijahW » Tue May 02, 2017 2:23 pm

[/quote]
Bob,

Are there any areas you want me to check for LiDAR coverage and then search ?   Thanks to Zane sharing a few trade secrets with me, I am now able to bulk search LiDAR data just like the pros.[/quote]

Michael,

I don't intend to speak out of turn, but if you're able to do anything with the NY Lidar, it would be an immense help.  Much of the state has at least some coverage, but I've not been able to make any sense of it yet.  What I'm interested in most is the eastern Adirondacks and any portion of the Catskills.  For the time being, I've pushed Lidar off to the side and have been relying on Google Earth.  Thanks,

Elijah
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#16)  Re: LiDAR search reveals tallest pine tree on Earth

Postby Larry Tucei » Tue May 02, 2017 5:43 pm

Michael, Zane-     If you get the time I would be interested in Lidar from National Forests in Ms. Bienville NF, Hommochitto NF, Desoto NF, and  Tombigbee NF.  It is the future for sure. Jess Riddle got some for me of Noxubee NWR and Delta National Forest. I found new Ms. tree height records as did he. I've been searching for years from the ground and found trees to the high 130's. With Lidar some 140'+  to 150' trees were located fairly easy.  Thanks, Larry
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#17)  Re: LiDAR search reveals tallest pine tree on Earth

Postby Erik Danielsen » Wed May 03, 2017 7:45 pm

I would second Elijah regarding NY data- using the tutorials here I've managed to look at PA liDAR data, the state website for which is pretty easy to use. As a non-GIS person the NY site is a nightmare and my attempts to piece together the bits of datasets I was able to pull from the broader USGS website have come to naught.

I would think that perhaps the third "age of discovery" belongs to the species that do not generally account for the maximum readings on a liDAR graph. A liDAR graph of Welwyn Preserve on long Island would show a little peaks in one particular spot for a couple nice tulip in the 140s- but it wouldn't tell you that poking into the shallow trough between their crowns is a 121.3' tall Betula lenta.
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#18)  Re: LiDAR search reveals tallest pine tree on Earth

Postby M.W.Taylor » Thu May 11, 2017 8:38 pm

Erik, I looked at many NY LiDAR sets and they are mostly very noisy. I needed to remove all the parasite pixels before I could get the LiDAR software to process the point clouds.
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#19)  Re: Pinus Wars LiDAR search reveals tallest pine tree on Ea

Postby M.W.Taylor » Sat May 13, 2017 2:25 pm

mdvaden wrote:Michael ...

With several pines this tall now, it may be a worthwhile endeavor to remeasure the pines west of Grants Pass, plus these others you've measured in California to keep track of their growth rates. If not yearly, maybe bi-yearly or tri-yearly to see if one region favors faster growth, decline, etc..

Thanks for the update.



Mario,  Unless one lived close, who has the time and money to do tri-yearly measurements on Oregon's tallest known pine ?

I certainly do not.  You live in those parts. Why not you do it ?
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#20)  Re: Pinus Wars LiDAR search reveals tallest pine tree on Ea

Postby mdvaden » Sat May 13, 2017 8:00 pm

M.W.Taylor wrote:

Mario,  Unless one lived close, who has the time and money to do tri-yearly measurements on Oregon's tallest known pine ?

I certainly do not.  You live in those parts. Why not you do it ?


It would be easy for me to make the time up there. I didn't think my laser was calibrated properly to match your last readings. When I last measured Tsunami the tall hemlock with Atkins, he noted that my 200LR seemed to read differently than his.

The other day I was out bushwhacking with Atkins and he had two lasers with him. His 200LR and the newer model too. We should cross paths a couple times in the months ahead. Wouldn't we be able to fine tune my laser's scope (if needed) by sighting a couple of the same trees?
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