Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

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sradivoy
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Re: Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

Post by sradivoy » Mon Jul 11, 2016 8:18 am

Larry Tucei wrote:John-
Great images of some of the largest trees on the Planet- Don- Great images of Foxtail and Bristlecone! You know we should have a California Ents -Wnts extravaganza in the near future! It would be great to help promote these special places and to make people aware of how delicate this Ecosystem really is! You western guys would know where to go and we could visit several different sites time, weather permitting. What say you Don, Will, Bob, John, Michael, Mario, Duncan, BVP, Mark, Matt, Don B, Randy, Chris and all. Larry
If you ever decide to have a WNTs event at Quinault Lake in Washington state you can count me in. There is so much untapped potential there that it would undoubtedly rewrite the record books in terms of Doug fir, Sitka spruce, and redcedar, among others. A big tree hunters paradise!

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sradivoy
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Re: Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

Post by sradivoy » Mon Jul 11, 2016 8:33 am

Don wrote: ... there are 107 breweries in between!
Don,
I would love to try the highly sought after Pliny the Elder and Pliny the Younger from Russian River Brewery. Also, is the famed Alaskan Smoked Porter as good as people say?

Stefan

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sradivoy
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Re: Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

Post by sradivoy » Mon Jul 11, 2016 9:01 am

gnmcmartin wrote:Back to the original question, coast redwoods or giant sequoias? Much of the time, my preference has been whichever one I was walking among at the time. But, if I were to pick just one spot that is my favorite "tree place," it would be standing among the trees in the "House Group" near the end of the Congress Trail walk in Sequoia National Park. These trees are nowhere near the largest trees, and are smaller in diameter than the average giant sequoia because they are growing so close together, and have relatively small and short crowns. BUT, looking up amidst these trees is the most stunning "tree experience" I have ever had, and I visited this spot a number of times. The trunks, all rising so close together, reddish, with the large flutes or bark ridges, make me think of some temple to some unspeakable/indescribable power, or source of beauty, in nature. To use the cliché, this is the most stunning "forest cathedral" effect I have seen. In the evening, near sunset, these trunks rising so beautifully, seem to have their own inner glow--a reddish kind of radiance--and seem to reveal some special inner essence of nature, towering up to what seems like an unimaginable height.

--Gaines
I had a similar epiphany with the aptly named Genesis tree. The sun illuminated the tree to make it look like it was made out of 24 carat gold along with this beautiful, elongated, and very dark battle scar running right through the center of it. The contrast was striking, no pun intended.

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gnmcmartin
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Re: Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

Post by gnmcmartin » Mon Jul 11, 2016 8:13 pm

Don and tree/forest lovers:

I probably didn't say enough about Crescent meadow. Of course, when I noted that John Muir said it was "the gem of the sierra," that may say it all, so forgive my elaboration. It is a long, crescent shaped meadow, entirely surrounded by giant sequoias. Nothing I can say could do justice to the beauty of this place, but one thing struck me every time I was there--the shades of color in the meadow grasses and other native plants. No "gem" could ever mimic this radiant color shading. This is an entirely natural meadow, and was not created by any tree cutting. Water runs through the meadow, but I never saw any stream, as such. The ground is soggy up to the margins, and this results in a large sequoia toppling into the meadow very occasionally, which seems to impede the water flow, and helps to preserve the meadow. In a couple of places, one can walk out into the meadow on a fallen sequoia tree.

In a way, it is a shame that this meadow is so easily accessible to crowds of people, but few really take the time to walk around it much, so solitude is quite possible. It deserves some time, not just a quick look, which is what most people give it. If I had just one day to live, and could choose one "forest place" to spend my last hours on Earth, it could very well be Crescent Meadow.

--Gaines

Albert Bierstadt did several paintings of the giant sequoias, and one, while not a specific representation of Crescent meadow, was clearly inspired by it.

It has been almost 30 years since I visited Giant Forest, and there must have been changes, and "human impacts" since then. But in one regard, maybe things have gotten better. There used to be a hub of human activity right in the midst of some of the most beautiful sequoia forest, with cabins, restaurants, and a campground. I have heard that this part of the forest has been restored, all the cabins, etc., removed. Between where the cabins were, and the campground, is a quite beautiful meadow, called "Round Meadow." This may now have become a beauty spot of its own. Reading about the trails in Giant Forest, it seems that after this restoration, they have established a trail around this meadow. This is not, I would guess, nearly as beautiful as Crescent Meadow, but I would like to see it again sometime, and see how much its beauty has been enhanced by the restoration. If any of you get there, I would look forward to your report on the restoration of the areas surrounding, and near this meadow.

--Gaines

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Don
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Re: Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

Post by Don » Wed Jul 13, 2016 9:47 pm

Stefan-
Many have written me that they think those living in Alaska are blessed (they're right!), but don't realize how good those who appreciate really good beer have it up here. It's not that we have a lot of breweries locally. It's not that we have more breweries per capita than those in the lower 48 states. It's that our brewers are exceptionally good, innovative, collaborative, and enthusiastic. They make really, really good beers. Just this afternoon, we went to the 49th State Brewery (recently expanded from Denali/Healy area), sat out on a deck (best in Anchorage, bar none) looking out over the Cook Inlet, the Sleeping Lady Mountain, the Alaska Mtn. Range as it heads up towards Denali (20,308' tallest in North America), also visible from the deck, even though 250 miles away as the proverbial crow flies.
They were having a soft opening, and still had 20 some of their own beers to offer on tap...with no time to sample the full regimen, I chose first a Wee Heavy Scotch Ale (8.6% ABV) and after, a Smoked Marzen 6.8% ABV), the latter a recent award winner. And they're relatively new (several years?).
Yes, Alaska Brewing's Smoked Porter has been legendary,winning year after year at the GABF national beer festival/competition, and perennially at the World Beer Cup. We often have opportunities for beer/food pairings at a wide array of restaurants around town, and several times during Alaska Beer Week, we've had Alaska Brewing offer Smoked Porter "flights", where they offer glasses of multiple vintages...last year it was 1999, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2009. Midway through those years, Alaska Brewing shifted from their almost backyard smoking operation to the purchase of fish smoking operation that they converted (alder favored). Took a year to work out the difference in scale between their early operation and the more productive one that followed.
Living in Alaska, we get to try Alaska Brewing's Rough Draft and Pilot Series offerings, where there brewers are given a free hand once a year to try something they think folks might like. Baltic Porters were an early one i favored, and a few years later a Raspberry Porter was a popular winter beer.
That said, these aren't even my favorite breweries!
-Don
sradivoy wrote:
Don wrote: ... there are 107 breweries in between!
Don,
I would love to try the highly sought after Pliny the Elder and Pliny the Younger from Russian River Brewery. Also, is the famed Alaskan Smoked Porter as good as people say?

Stefan
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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Don
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Re: Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

Post by Don » Wed Jul 13, 2016 9:52 pm

Gaines-
I am days from a 4 week journey that will take me into the Sierras, most assuredly to include the Senate Group/Crescent Meadow/Giant Forest areas!
Thanks for the tips!
-Don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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DAKennedy
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Re: Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

Post by DAKennedy » Wed Jul 13, 2016 10:59 pm

Don wrote:Stefan-
Many have written me that they think those living in Alaska are blessed (they're right!), but don't realize how good those who appreciate really good beer have it up here. It's not that we have a lot of breweries locally. It's not that we have more breweries per capita than those in the lower 48 states. It's that our brewers are exceptionally good, innovative, collaborative, and enthusiastic. They make really, really good beers.
SNIP
Don,

If you are going down the Sierra to the Mojave Desert on the east side, then my entire family would highly recommend Indian Wells Brewing Co. They make such timeless brews as Mojave Red, Fat Tire, Orange Blossom Ale and many others. And if you get bored of alcohol (not likely), then they make a pretty good cream soda and the best Root Beer I have ever tasted.

Also, in the Blairsden area (~20 minutes from my home), the Brewing Lair of the Lost Sierra opened a few years ago. They make really good beers, as well as good kombucha.

- Duncan
Duncan Kennedy
Student; UNR Environmental Sci.
Tree Measurer.

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

Post by Larry Tucei » Thu Jul 14, 2016 6:46 am

Gaines- The Meadow you mention sounds like a wonderful place for the group to visit when we make the trip out west. Larry

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John Harvey
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Re: Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

Post by John Harvey » Thu Jul 14, 2016 9:45 am

Gaines, Larry,

Crescent Meadow is still doing well. I took a few photos when I was there.
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John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Coast Redwood vs Giant Sequoia

Post by Larry Tucei » Thu Jul 14, 2016 12:13 pm

John- Wow! Beautiful images of Crescent Meadow. Love the wildflowers!!!

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