Redwood Stumps

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John Harvey
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Re: Redwood Stumps

Post by John Harvey » Fri Mar 13, 2015 12:20 am

Mark,
Its frightening really to think about what could happen to the forests we have left. I would think as long as "civilized" America exists, the OG redwoods will remain. What happens 100, 200, or 300 and more years down the line we will never know. If the climate doesn't kill them off my worst fear is the wrong regime, if you will, governing California. Something like a world economic meltdown, a dictatorship, or ironically a regression from modern technology could spell doom. I guess that's why we have to teach the future generations their importance and the ways in which to show respect for the ancient ones.
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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sradivoy
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Re: Redwood Stumps

Post by sradivoy » Tue Mar 17, 2015 7:12 pm

Corporate tyranny run amok set out to maximize profits at all costs ... and totally unaccountable. Mind you these corporate entities aren't democratically controlled, but rather totalitarian regimes answerable only to the power elites. At the end of the day we all must succumb to their materialistic "values". As a result, the future doesn't bode well for the environment or for humanity. Enjoy these trees while they last!

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John Harvey
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Re: Redwood Stumps

Post by John Harvey » Wed Mar 18, 2015 12:43 am

sradivoy,
Your correct that "profit" and unethical companies looking to make a profit have destroyed the best of the worlds forest. That being said, if you look at the environmental track record of MOST governments, right and left...its just awful. The plain truth is that most businesses and most governments do NOT represent the best interests of the people or the environment. China is a great example right now, Australia's history with their old growth Eucalyptus forests, and so on...just bad. The ONLY reason, I repeat the only reason the USA has improved and done things like make national parks and save clusters of old growth is because its people do have a say, albeit it small, about what happens here. It wasn't a government or a company that did any saving. It was folks like John Muir and Save the Redwoods League, and __________(fill in the blank), that made the difference. Its small people with big voices and great passion that change anything at all...
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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sradivoy
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Re: Redwood Stumps

Post by sradivoy » Wed Mar 18, 2015 11:14 am

JohnnyDJersey wrote:sradivoy,
Your correct that "profit" and unethical companies looking to make a profit have destroyed the best of the worlds forest. That being said, if you look at the environmental track record of MOST governments, right and left...its just awful. The plain truth is that most businesses and most governments do NOT represent the best interests of the people or the environment. China is a great example right now, Australia's history with their old growth Eucalyptus forests, and so on...just bad. The ONLY reason, I repeat the only reason the USA has improved and done things like make national parks and save clusters of old growth is because its people do have a say, albeit it small, about what happens here. It wasn't a government or a company that did any saving. It was folks like John Muir and Save the Redwoods League, and __________(fill in the blank), that made the difference. Its small people with big voices and great passion that change anything at all...

Ordinary people no longer have a voice in this corrupt system of ours. Big money is "speech" and a corporation is a "person", which reduces everyone else into a kind of cellular mass by default . Politically and economically we"re moving backwards into a kind of Neo-feudalism. The Robber barons of old have returned with a vengeance. The money "trickles up" while the technology rains down into a thick layer of detritinus mass. We're in the midst of creating a technological "life-form" that will be completely oblivious to any kind of climate change. Its a race against time at this point.The fact that we're being dehumanized in the process means that it won't be carrying our "DNA" - it will be a new species based entirely on market driven principles . One day our buildings of today will be viewed by them like our decaying redwood stumps of old.

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Don
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Re: Redwood Stumps

Post by Don » Fri Mar 20, 2015 4:32 pm

Uhhhmmm, maybe we can get back to the joys of big trees?
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mdvaden
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Re: Redwood Stumps

Post by mdvaden » Sun Jul 22, 2018 10:23 pm

THREAD REVIVAL !

Decided to post in this old thread today, after reading an article about the Fieldbrook stump and some guy's plan to print the growth rings.

LINK > http://www.times-standard.com/article/N ... /160539980

Think I read it once before, but just skimmed over the part about the cross-cut and height. This time it held my attention. The 12' x 13' chunk averages 12.5' diameter, cut 70 feet above ground level. That's serious fast taper. Basically, the Fieldbrook tree was shaped very much like Deja Vu, a wide redwood found the past few years in Redwood National and State Parks. Fat base, but narrows pretty fast.

The taper on Fieldbrook was so fast, there's no way it was one of the largest ever. Nothing at all like Crannell Giant, etc. And certainly not like Sherman, as a couple articles stated. With that kind of taper, Fieldbrook's volume was probably similar to one of the 5 or 10 largest coast redwoods still standing today.

For years, I had "taken it on faith" various comments about Fieldbrook. But after reading more this week, the urban legends fell like a house of cards.
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Don
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Re: Redwood Stumps

Post by Don » Sat Apr 11, 2020 7:38 pm

For a 'bigger picture', witness the millions year old redwood stump (one of several) that I first saw in a trans-US travel in the 1970's, located in the Florissant Fossil Beds in Colorado, at todays elevation of approximately 8500'
Florissant Redwood Stump.docx
(12.53 KiB) Downloaded 59 times

Click on image to see its original size[attachment=0]Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 5.20.47 PM.png

-Don
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Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 5.20.47 PM.png

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Don
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Re: Redwood Stumps

Post by Don » Sat Apr 11, 2020 7:41 pm

What follows is snippet from UC Berkeley Study on Florissant Fossil Beds, meant to be included above...
Among the hallmarks of the monument are the remains of the massive petrified redwood trees that once dominated the Florissant forest of 150 plant species. The famous "Redwood trio" at Florissant is the only known fossil occurrence of a redwood "family circle." Modern coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) reproduce from sprouts that grow from the base of the parent tree. These root sprouts can grow to normal size trees especially in cases where the parent dies, as was the case at Florissant. We know that in addition to the redwoods, there were other conifers and hardwoods growing around the lake margin and at higher elevations that provided food and shelter to populations of insects (~1500 species), birds, and a growing list of mammals that include a pigmy opossum, rodents, horses, rhinoceros-like brontotheres, sheep-sized oreodonts, deer-like animals, a tapir-like ancestor of the rhinoceroses, and the oldest fossil mole. Lake Florissant was also home to shorebirds, numerous freshwater gastropods, clams, ostracods, insect larvae, aquatic plants and fish — their remains sandwiched between layers of paper-thin, diatom-rich shales like beautifully illustrated pages of a book.

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