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Subjective view of the Sequoia old-growth

Posted: Mon Jun 03, 2013 3:59 pm
by AndrewJoslin
I recently finished editing a montage of video and photographs from a visit to the Sierra National Forest in April 2010. The purpose of the video is to communicate a subjective sensory/emotional view of the Sierra Nevada old-growth, enjoy:
https://vimeo.com/66697211

-AJ

Re: Subjective view of the Sequoia old-growth

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 5:14 am
by Joe
Andrew, I enjoyed your video very much. Could you give us a little info about your video method? Which camera? What editing software? (I like the split screen effect) I see at the end a mention of Creative Commons License to use the music. How do you find music with that?
Joe

Re: Subjective view of the Sequoia old-growth

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 8:27 am
by Jenny
Andrew, Amazing images and engrossing video. What an exhilarating trip that must have been. Thank you so much for putting that together.

Jenny

Re: Subjective view of the Sequoia old-growth

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 12:15 pm
by AndrewJoslin
Joe wrote:Andrew, I enjoyed your video very much. Could you give us a little info about your video method? Which camera? What editing software? (I like the split screen effect) I see at the end a mention of Creative Commons License to use the music. How do you find music with that?
Joe

Thanks Joe! For shooting video I use whatever camera I have at hand, for the Sequoia Expedition video I used a Sony HD Handycam hand-held. More recently I've added a Contour HD helmet cam to my gear collection and I also shoot with my iPhone which makes surprisingly excellent video.

To edit I use Adobe Premiere Elements (the non-pro/home version of Adobe Premiere). I create the split screen effect manually in Premiere by layering the photos over the video clips or over each other. The video editor (like most video editors) allows you to create multiple tracks with photos and video clips on each track. A track also contains the sound portion o the video or additional sound clips can be added in.

You manage the tracks in a "timeline" view which visualizes all the tracks, their objects (video/sound/photos). For a each video clip, sound clip or photo you can create transition effects to fade from one to the other.

For this video I used music from the Free Music Archive. You can search the archive to find music that fits your video. For any track that you find on the sight there is licensing info. For well-known artists use is highly restricted, you need to pay for the right to use the music in a video. Other artists allow use under various flavors of "Creative Commons" license, the details of which are specified with any track you wish to download. For example the music I downloaded can be be used free in non-commercial projects, there are certain conditions such as the video maker must include specified links to the Free Music Archive and to other artist info.

Here's a screen capture showing the timeline view in my video editor for the Sequoia Expedition, very complex, labor intensive. I'm a patient person so I can bear to do this kind of thing ;-) It can be frustrating learning to use these editors but if you stick with it the process becomes easier over time. This is very complex because of all the cross-fading and layering I'm doing between video and photos as well as manipulating the music clips I'm using.


Click on image to see its original size

Video editing can be waaaay less complex than what's above, it's a worse case scenario for editing hell ;-)
-AJ

Re: Subjective view of the Sequoia old-growth

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 1:06 pm
by Joe
Andrew, thanks for the tip. I've been using MS Movie Maker, an elementary video editor but it's time to move up. I think I'll also buy a "steadcam" type support thing for my Canon HV20 camcorder- so I can walk through a forest and get a smooth video without the up and down from walking. I'll check out the "free music archive".
Joe

Re: Subjective view of the Sequoia old-growth

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 4:46 pm
by AndrewJoslin
Joe wrote:Andrew, thanks for the tip. I've been using MS Movie Maker, an elementary video editor but it's time to move up. I think I'll also buy a "steadcam" type support thing for my Canon HV20 camcorder- so I can walk through a forest and get a smooth video without the up and down from walking. I'll check out the "free music archive".
Joe
Huge challenge to get a smooth shot while walking. That's why pros set up all kinds of crazy track systems to move the cameras mechanically. One way I deal with that on a budget is to shoot both walking and stationary camera footage of a particular scene. For example setting a camera on a tripod (or a rock) and walking past it. Or shoot someone else walking past the camera. Then shoot again holding the camera while walking. In the video editor you can intersperse the two clips to create an authentic feel of walking and being in that particular location.
-AJ