A favorite Norway spruce has fallen

Forests and trees that are special to ENTS members. Place that elicit powerful emotional feelings and fond and deep memories to that person.

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PAwildernessadvocate
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A favorite Norway spruce has fallen

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Tue Apr 03, 2012 9:00 am

I guess you just never know which tree could randomly bite the bullet at any time in the middle of the woods.

Ok, this was not that big of a tree. However, there is a place in the woods above Bradford, PA that I always like visiting when hiking out there. It is a nice quiet little secluded spot, like a little cove, that had a nice Norway spruce growing in the middle of it. Seemed like a relatively sheltered location, hidden from view, not close to any trail or any of the old logging roads back there. I always liked to stop and rest there for a few minutes, sit down under that nice straight, seemingly healthy Norway spruce and imagine how big and old it could potentially get with time. Maybe I would bring my grandchildren out here to show them someday, I thought. I'd been visiting the tree for about ten years.

Well, yesterday was the first time I stopped by the location in probably more than a year. Wouldn't you know it, the tree has fallen. Probably sometime as recently as during this calendar year, but I bet not within the last month given that upon examination it could be seen that the buds hadn't started expanding like they have done so early this year.

I would estimate the tree to have been about 50 years old, and it was probably about 70-75 feet tall. Maybe 18" dbh. Not huge, just one of my personal favorite trees.

Funny how randomly these things can happen. There were no other recently wind thrown trees like this one anywhere in the immediate vicinity.
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Last edited by PAwildernessadvocate on Wed Apr 04, 2012 10:34 am, edited 2 times in total.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

RyanLeClair
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Re: A favorite Norway spruce has fallen

Post by RyanLeClair » Tue Apr 03, 2012 9:05 pm

It's sad when something like this happens, but if you accept it for what it is it actually has its own beauty.

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: A favorite Norway spruce has fallen

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Tue Apr 03, 2012 9:37 pm

Alas. But the regular work of Mother Nature in the forests.

I really like Norway spruce. One of the few non-native species that I enjoy seeing.

RyanLeClair
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Re: A favorite Norway spruce has fallen

Post by RyanLeClair » Tue Apr 03, 2012 9:55 pm

jamesrobertsmith wrote:Alas. But the regular work of Mother Nature in the forests.

I really like Norway spruce. One of the few non-native species that I enjoy seeing.
They remind me of the Sitka spruce, which might be my favorite tree.

Interestingly enough, Picea abies is considered a trash tree by a lot gardeners. The famed Michael Dirr describes it as a totally mediocre conifer. I feel there is some disparity between the horticultural world and the naturalist world, to say the least.

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: A favorite Norway spruce has fallen

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Wed Apr 04, 2012 10:36 am

jamesrobertsmith wrote: I really like Norway spruce. One of the few non-native species that I enjoy seeing.
Me too! In my opinion they really "fit in" to the eastern forests, even though they're not native.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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Rand
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Re: A favorite Norway spruce has fallen

Post by Rand » Wed Apr 04, 2012 11:13 am

RyanLeClair wrote:
jamesrobertsmith wrote:Alas. But the regular work of Mother Nature in the forests.

I really like Norway spruce. One of the few non-native species that I enjoy seeing.
They remind me of the Sitka spruce, which might be my favorite tree.

Interestingly enough, Picea abies is considered a trash tree by a lot gardeners. The famed Michael Dirr describes it as a totally mediocre conifer. I feel there is some disparity between the horticultural world and the naturalist world, to say the least.
It might depend one where it is growing too. For example, they don't do too well in NW ohio compared to other areas (heavy clay soil, limestone bedrock). Once they get passed ~10 dbh their growth tends to decline and the crown gets thin and ratty looking. At least that is the impression I get from looking at the pictures other post of them growing in states further east.

Probably not coincidently, White Pine shows similar behavior. I remember the fist time I went to Cook Forest, and my reaction was like 'Duh... Oh... Is that what they are supposed to look like.

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