New sites on giant eucalypts

Discussions of trees, forests, trip reports and site descriptions of other locations in Australia and New Zealand.

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

User avatar
KoutaR
Posts: 678
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 3:41 am

Re: New sites on giant eucalypts

Post by KoutaR » Tue Mar 05, 2013 4:14 pm

Brett,

Is there any chances that Centurion will be dethroned?

I guess that the reason why the giant eucalypts grow on ridges and slopes and not on valley bottoms is that the latter sites don't burn or burn very rarely, so eucalypts have no chances to regenerate?

Kouta

User avatar
Jess Riddle
Posts: 440
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 10:59 am

Re: New sites on giant eucalypts

Post by Jess Riddle » Thu Mar 07, 2013 11:53 pm

Brett,

Well, I’m glad I asked, because several of your answers and figures in the Forestry Tasmania poster surprised me. I thought the region was much wetter with precipitation comparable to the pacific coast of the northwestern United States. I knew Eucalyptus were efficient water users, but reaching those heights and sizes with less than two meters of precipitation is still impressive. The weak effect of aspect is also surprising. Looking at the Forestry Tasmania figure, the preference for north and east aspsects is quite weak. In eastern North America, aspect plays a strong role in determining maximum tree height. Tall trees usually grow on north to east aspects, and tall forests on south aspects are typically associated with unusually rich soils.

Most of the tall Eucalyptus seem to grow on calcium rich soils. I wonder if the giant trees on more acidic bedrock are actually growing in areas with small lenses of richer bedrock or where topography has caused nutrients to accumulate. We don’t have good data, but that pattern seems to occur in eastern North America.

The Forestry Tasmania poster provides a nice overview of where the giant Eucalyptus grow, and takes advantage of available hard data. It would be nice to see separate figures for large and tall trees in case there are subtle differences in where they grow. I may be inspired to produce something similar for some Southern Appalachian species.

The logging/preservation of these trees is a little hard to grasp too. I was very surprised to read that it wasn’t until the 1990’s that prime areas of the Styx Valley were set aside; campaigns focused on protecting old-growth forests established much earlier in the United States. It sounds like that attitude has shifted considerably since individual trees now receive protection based solely on their size, and there is even thought towards protecting exceptional regrowth that may produce future giants!

One tree that really stands out in the figures and stats is Rullah Longantyle, the giant E. globulus. It appears to be far larger than any other known member of its species. I assume it has just managed to compete with the mountain ash on a site that is productive enough that they would normally exclude all other Eucalyptus.

I wish our trees were big enough to pick out the big ones with Google map photos.

Thanks,
Jess

User avatar
KoutaR
Posts: 678
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 3:41 am

Re: New sites on giant eucalypts

Post by KoutaR » Mon Mar 11, 2013 10:59 am

Jess,

Unfortunately, it looks like Brett Mifsud registered at ents-bbs.org only for answering to your questions after I alerted him. I did it twice but I will not do it anymore. You can contact him through his site:
http://victoriasgianttrees.weebly.com/l ... ntact.html

His e-mail is here:
http://www.landmarktrees.net/contact.html

Kouta

Post Reply

Return to “Australia and New Zealand”