Manchuria, aka northeast China

Trees and forests of continental Asia

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Neil
Posts: 143
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2010 2:17 pm

Re: Manchuria, aka northeast China

Post by Neil » Wed Nov 09, 2011 7:30 am

Dear NTS,

Moving into the Qing Yuan Secondary Broadleaf Research Forest.

QingYuanExpForestStreamScene2.jpg
a general scene from one of the older sections of this secondary forest

QingYuanExpForestStreamSceneBirchColor.jpg
another, "it feels like home" scene

AcerPalmatum-redLeaves.jpg
Acer palmatum leaves


AcerPalmatum.jpg
Acer palmatum trunk


AcerTrifolium.jpg
Acer trifolium


FraxinusRhynchophlyya.jpg
Fraxinus rhynchophylla


MalusBaccata.jpg
Malus baccata (sorry, leaves were off)


PyrusUssuriensis.jpg
Pyrus ussuriensis (sorry, leaves were off)


QingYuanForestNewStationLandscape.jpg
Finally, for today - the internal investments that China is making are all over the place. From the 3 week old highway north of Shenyang to the new forest research station they are constructing [the large building rising in the background]. The original station, the one level building in front of it, is only 8 years old. China is building!

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Neil
Posts: 143
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2010 2:17 pm

Re: Manchuria, aka northeast China

Post by Neil » Thu Nov 10, 2011 6:22 am

Dear NTS,

A few more pictures from Qing Yuan Secondary Broadleaf Experimental Forest:

QuercusMongolicaAcornAndCap.jpg
Quercus mongolica acorn and cap

QuercusMongolicaBarkUlmusBarkStudy.jpg
Quercus mongolica bark with Ulmus lacinata in the background


QuercusMongolicaLikeBurrOak.jpg
Quercus mongolica leaf

UlmusLaciniataBark.jpg
Ulmus lacinata bark

UlmusInYellowGlow.jpg
Ulmus in full autumn glory


WeigelaFlordaShrub.jpg
Weigela florda


TiliaFirZhenjuForestPan.jpg
Tilia, Abies, Betula are the prominent trees from L-R


QingYuanForestAdminPond.jpg
the pond in front of the forest administrator's house. this is where the trees are labeled, too.

QingYuanForestAdminBridge.jpg
lovely bridge work

GapSmallOakRegen.jpg
they were conducting a gap study in the forest that they wanted to share. the really interesting thing was that the gaps were quite full with oak regeneration. i asked them if they had burned the forest as a part of this experiment. they said no. this image is one of the smaller gaps. the saplings with the orange'ish colored leaves are all oak.

ZhenjuQingYuanExForestMaples.jpg
Again, this trip wouldn't have been possible without support from Dr. Zhenju Chen (baseball cap on backwards). I am indebted to his hosting.

I'll likely take a break for a few days before moving to the Bhutan pictures.

neil

Joe

Re: Manchuria, aka northeast China

Post by Joe » Thu Nov 10, 2011 6:49 am

I like the Acer palmatum leaves. Just curious, but is it allowed to introduce any of these species to the USA? What are the rules on this? I suppose if the climate is similar to the USA east- the species would "escape"- but that might not be so bad since we're losing so many species- if carefully thought out.
Joe

Joe

Re: Manchuria, aka northeast China

Post by Joe » Thu Nov 10, 2011 7:24 am

Neil, just a thought- but your photos and discussion are so good, that you should put them up on a web page or blog.
Joe

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edfrank
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Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 5:46 pm

Re: Manchuria, aka northeast China

Post by edfrank » Thu Nov 10, 2011 10:33 am

Joe,

The BBS is a webpage - just not specifically devoted to his China Report. All of the posts will be incorporated into November's eNTS Magazine also.

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Neil
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Re: Manchuria, aka northeast China

Post by Neil » Thu Nov 10, 2011 5:35 pm

hi Joe,

I would bet that perhaps Acer palmatum is already here somewhere. I, too, would fear it escaping.

Thanks for your kind words on my posting here. I was so excited during the trip about the similarities, that I took a ton of forest pictures. When I looked through them, I realized much of my family and many of friends would be into them so much. But, I knew who would be and where I had to share them first - NTS! [my tree/forest family]. I'm thrilled to share these her with you all. I've learned so much from the community, from the first OG conference to today, that I just had to give something back. Some urging from a couple of colleagues and a revelation or two on this trip are pushing me to the blogosphere. I will start something quite soon. It will likely all revolve many of the elements I join in on here and will have repeated elements [I'm at that point that I repeat stories...]. So, this stuff will emerge again. But, have to share here first.

Ed - thanks for collating all of this into NTS publications!

neil

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Steve Galehouse
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Re: Manchuria, aka northeast China

Post by Steve Galehouse » Thu Nov 10, 2011 10:36 pm

Neil, Joe, NTS-

Acer palmatum, Japanese maple, is a cultivated ornamental everywhere in the landscape in the East, Midwest, and Pacific Northwest, typically as cultivars such as Bloodgood, Crimson Queen, and Viridis. It seldom escapes cultivation, and I've never seen naturalized, let alone invasive. It's safe, unlike Norway maple(or Norway spruce). Weigela florida is also a cultivated ornamental with many cultivars, but seems to not escape either. Malus baccata, Siberian crab, is in the lineage of many cultivated flowering crab varieties. Occasionally a flowering crab of Asian derivation is found as an escape, but not to the degree of being invasive.
every plant is native somewhere

Joe

Re: Manchuria, aka northeast China

Post by Joe » Fri Nov 11, 2011 4:57 am

Steve Galehouse wrote:Neil, Joe, NTS-

Acer palmatum, Japanese maple, is a cultivated ornamental everywhere in the landscape in the East, Midwest, and Pacific Northwest, typically as cultivars such as Bloodgood, Crimson Queen, and Viridis. It seldom escapes cultivation, and I've never seen naturalized, let alone invasive. It's safe, unlike Norway maple(or Norway spruce). Weigela florida is also a cultivated ornamental with many cultivars, but seems to not escape either. Malus baccata, Siberian crab, is in the lineage of many cultivated flowering crab varieties. Occasionally a flowering crab of Asian derivation is found as an escape, but not to the degree of being invasive.
Oh, palmatum is Japanese maple? I didn't recognize it. The ones I'm familiar with have leaves that look different- it's been a favorite of mine for decades.
Joe

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Neil
Posts: 143
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2010 2:17 pm

Re: Manchuria, aka northeast China

Post by Neil » Fri Nov 11, 2011 5:50 am

yeah, thanks Steve! i didn't recognize Acer palmatum as Japanese maple [facepalm].

it looked different than the ones around, so i was thinking it was a variety special to the region. i guess there are places to look these things up...

neil

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Lee Frelich
Posts: 155
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 3:24 pm

Re: Manchuria, aka northeast China

Post by Lee Frelich » Sat Nov 12, 2011 2:03 pm

Neil:

I liked your pictures of P koraiensis. The University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum has a collection of supposedly every tree species in the world that will grow in Minnesota's climate, and they are arranged by genus along a three-mile long walkway. One time I was measuring eastern white pine of different ages to construct a height versus age relationship that we could use to project future changes in shading for tree plantings, and was very surprised when I looked at the tag of one of my specimens, and saw 'Pinus koraiensis'. I thought sure it was an eastern white pine. You can't tell the difference without the cones.

Lee

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