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Ancient trees up for adoption - China

Posted: Thu May 12, 2011 10:30 am
by edfrank
Ancient trees up for adoption
Source: Global Times [14:24 May 10 2011]
By Wei Na
http://beijing.globaltimes.cn/society/2 ... 53485.html
Of the 2,600 ancient trees listed for adoption by five major Beijing parks, less than 100 have found financial caretakers. While some think high fees are scaring people off, the parks note that they are far less than the tree's actual maintenance costs.


Click on image to see its original size
An ancient tree looms over a visitor to Ditan Park, in Dongcheng district, on May 50. Very few of the city's ancient trees awaiting adoption have found financial caretakers. Photo: Guo Yingguang/GT

About 228,000 trees young and old are listed for adoption this year at the Beijing Botanical Garden, the Summer Palace, Beihai Park, Zhongshan Park and Yuyuantan Park.

For an ordinary tree, annual fees are typically 50 to 500 yuan ($7.70 to $77). However, it costs individuals 2,000 to 50,000 yuan to adopt an ancient tree – one that is typically over 100 years old – and that amount doubles or triples if an institute is doing the adopting.
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Re: Ancient trees up for adoption - China

Posted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 9:37 am
by Gordon Mac
Dear ENTS,

I'm a new kid on the block and say hello to everybody involved in the ENTS activities.

Elms are my special field of work but my interests are broader. And currently, I have many more questions than I have answers. Here comes the first one:

Dear edfrank,

Were would I find the list of 2,600 ancient trees in Beijing? The link you give doesn't seem to work from my machine. Do you know of any other source than the Global Times? Do you have by any chance a copy of the list?

Regards,

Gordon

Re: Ancient trees up for adoption - China

Posted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 10:18 am
by edfrank
Gordan,

Some of these links, especially to foreign newspapers, expire after a time. I have looked for another link to the article, but have not found any. You could contact one of the places listed if you wanted to participate. There are a couple of links still active that also mention the program: http://www.fujitsu.com/cn/fsp/news/arch ... /0721.html others mention protections for old trees, but don't really give any details. Sorry I can't be of more help. If you find out something, please let the rest of us know.

Edward Frank

Re: Ancient trees up for adoption - China

Posted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 3:50 pm
by Joe
The Chinese government can afford modern weapons- so they can afford to maintain these trees.
Joe

Re: Ancient trees up for adoption - China

Posted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 4:19 pm
by edfrank
Joe,

The questions isn't about whether they can afford it or not, it is about the will to do so. Our government spends more on our military than the next twenty largest militaries in the world combined, yet somehow we do not have enough money to do adequate maintenance or staffing of our own National parks. To top it off we are subject to the disingenuous argument that we must allow more lodges, more logging, more of every commercial type of development in order to afford to maintain them.

Ed

Re: Ancient trees up for adoption - China

Posted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 4:25 pm
by Joe
edfrank wrote:Joe,

The questions isn't about whether they can afford it or not, it is about the will to do so. Our government spends more on our military than the next twenty largest militaries in the world combined, yet somehow we do not have enough money to do adequate maintenance or staffing of our own National parks. To top it off we are subject to the disingenuous argument that we must allow more lodges, more logging, more of every commercial type of development in order to afford to maintain them.

Ed
well, my point being, that those who want to protect those trees should lean hard on the governmnent to do so

Re: Ancient trees up for adoption - China

Posted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 10:22 am
by edfrank
Festive flowers to supplant trees
Global Times | 2013-3-11 23:48:01
By Zhang Zihan

http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/76740 ... UXe1FfJKSo
Ahead of Tuesday's annual national tree planting day, Beijing's forestry department announced Monday that 3 million trees will be planted in 2013.

It will encourage residents to add to this quota by planting or adopting trees, or putting out decorative plants for festivals.

Beijing Municipal Bureau of Landscape and Forestry plans to set aside 3.88 square kilometers of land (approximately 359 standard soccer pitches) for tree planting. Also 889,000 trees and 11 square kilometers of lawns are ready for adoption, according to a press release.

For the first time, the city is supporting an ancient tree adoption program, offering 755 trees dating from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) for individuals or groups to sponsor.

Ju Zhaoming, an employee from Ritan Park, said the park has 44 of the 755 ancient trees, most of which are cypress.

"They are 200-300 years old. You sign a contract with us, and pay 10,000 yuan ($1,608) every year, and we do everything the tree needs, like watering and pest control," said Ju.

The National People's Congress made a decision in 2012 to ask every healthy Chinese citizen to plant three to five trees each year. People can also meet this quota by contributing to forestry works such as building firebreaks and paths. Adopting one ancient tree equals to planting 50 trees, while adopting three trees, 30 square meters of forest or six square meters of lawns also equals to planting one tree.

Residents can also meet the quota by donating to green foundations or putting decorative plants outside during festivals. If enterprises and government departments put 20 plants outside during festivals, this equals to planting one tree, and a donation of 60 yuan equals three trees.

Ma Jun, director of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs, said the announcement shows Beijing is pursuing a more flexible approach to tree planting, but whether putting decorative plants out is useful remains in question.

"Donating to environmental causes is a convenient way to protect the environment as this money can be used to hire people to plant trees and citizens do not need to plant on their own. However, putting plants outside cannot be compared to planting a real tree," said Ma.

"Decorative plants are only for festivals, but planting trees helps expand forests, which is necessary to balance and clean the ecological environment. It's unnecessary to bring these two things together," said Ma.

In 2012, 4 million trees were planted in Beijing, and 15.9 million saplings were cultivated, the bureau said.