European Records in Finland

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

#11)  Re: European Records in Finland

Postby KoutaR » Tue Dec 06, 2011 8:48 am

Jess,

The European Juniperus communis is also considered very shade intolerant. This like tree-juniper in forest is a extremely rare occurrence and must be an exceptional co-incidence of many factors, genetic as well as environmental. A guess: It was quite tall already when the surrounding spruces and birches were low. The growing forest forced it to grow in height. Locally the canopies were not too shade-casting (birch casts only light shade, spruce much more).

In Europe the vegetation zones occur north from the corresponding zones in other northern continents, due to powerful warm Gulf stream.

Kouta
User avatar
KoutaR
 
Posts: 615
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 4:41 am
Location: Germany
Has Liked: 76 times
Has Been Liked: 224 times
Print view this post

#12)  Re: European Records in Finland

Postby Chris » Thu Dec 08, 2011 8:44 pm

Steve Galehouse wrote:Jess-

Has the nomenclature changed regarding common juniper in eastern North America? I thought the arborescent form in eastern NA was Juniperus communis var. communis, while the spreading form was var. depressa; all the older texts I have separate the two distinctly. Are both now included in depressa?

Steve

Eflora describes 3 subspecies; depressa is the wide ranging subspecies in eastern North America
User avatar
Chris
 
Posts: 289
Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2011 8:52 pm
Location: Nevada
Has Liked: 144 times
Has Been Liked: 61 times
Print view this post

#13)  Re: European Records in Finland

Postby Jess Riddle » Thu Dec 15, 2011 4:52 pm

Steve,

The taxonomy of J. communis is rather messy.  There are several distinct varieties, but great phenotypic plasticity has also lead to multiple names being applied to a single variety.  Robert Adams (http://juniperus.org/) has made a career studying Juniperus, and he has done a good bit of genetic work on J. communis.  J. c. var. communis is widespread in Europe and apparently diverged from most North American populations a few million years ago.  Variety depressa is by far the most widespread in N America with individuals from North Carolina, the shores of Hudson Bay, and Danali National Park in Alaska showing strong genetic similarity.  There are other varieties in N America: a large fruited variety in Labrador or Newfoundland, var. jackii in the northern Pacific Northwest, and an undescribed variety that grows in muskegs in Alaska; however, var. communis is not known from N America.

The site in NY where I measured J. communis has spreading bushes as well as columnar individuals.  One plant bushy plant even had a single branch that had turned vertical and was rapidly elongating.  J. communis seems like a good example of a species that can drastically alter its growth form depending on growing conditions.

Jess
User avatar
Jess Riddle
 
Posts: 438
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 11:59 am
Location: Monticello, AR
Has Liked: 740 times
Has Been Liked: 454 times
Print view this post

#14)  Re: European Records in Finland

Postby KoutaR » Tue Jun 04, 2013 2:33 pm

NTS,

In the message # 1 of this thread, I told about the record common juniper (Juniperus communis). Its height was 16.4 m in 2011.

A juniper, which has probably been still taller, has been found in Hauho, Finland. It was found by Anu Tuominen who stands at the juniper in 2006 in the photo below taken by Jukka Siltanen.

               
                       
HauhoJuniperus.jpg
                                       
               

Jukka Lehtonen (with who I measured the 16.4-m juniper in 2011) recently visited the Hauho juniper with Anu and Jukka S. but it had unfortunately been snapped by wind 2-3 years ago.

               
                       
HauhoJuniperus-snag.jpg
                       
Anu Tuominen and the juniper snag in 2013. Photo by Jukka Lehtonen.
               
               

They measured the trunk lenght as 17.65 m. From the trunk lenght, and taking into account the leaning angle, which was estimated from photos, it can be estimated that the juniper has perhaps been about 17 m (56 ft) tall. The girth is 78 cm.

Kouta

For this message the author KoutaR has received Likes - 2:
F.Jakobsson, Will Blozan
User avatar
KoutaR
 
Posts: 615
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 4:41 am
Location: Germany
Has Liked: 76 times
Has Been Liked: 224 times
Print view this post

Previous

Return to Finland

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest