Logging Photo, White Pine?

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InglesLuke
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Logging Photo, White Pine?

Post by InglesLuke » Sun Jan 01, 2017 3:43 pm

I ran across this picture in the attached link and was skeptical of the claimed photo of the White Pine. The bark does totally look like W. Pine to me, it almost looks like a hemlock or even a doug fir. In addition it is a massive tree and although I'm sure some W. Pines left alone long enough on a great microsite could achieve such a size, this is clearly far bigger than the average size of even 300+ year old White Pines. However, the roots do remind me of the way W. Pines grow when they get some age.

Thoughts?
White pine or not?

Image:
https://michiganmarty.files.wordpress.c ... ging49.jpg

Article:
https://bluelemon.me/tag/logging/

Luke

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Ranger Dan
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Re: Logging Photo, White Pine?

Post by Ranger Dan » Mon Jan 02, 2017 12:06 pm

Looks like a Sierra Nevada forest to me. Ceanothus brush, trees on the right and far left are true firs, most likely white; dropping limbs on the tall tree on the left are characteristic of sugar pine (albeit lacking large pendulous cones), which is one guess for the tree being cut. However, this would not be an exceptional specimen of any western tree suitable to bolster the machismo of these crusty loggers. Its bark does not resemble the Sierra version of western white pine. Note the dark heartwood. Does eastern white pine have dark heartwood in large logs? I think not, but I'm not sure if sugar pine does, either. Douglas-fir does, and the bark looks like a match.

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dbhguru
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Re: Logging Photo, White Pine?

Post by dbhguru » Mon Jan 02, 2017 2:08 pm

Luke,

Agree with Dan. Not white pine. We have other examples of west coast logging photos being presented for eastern and midwestern regions.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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InglesLuke
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Re: Logging Photo, White Pine?

Post by InglesLuke » Mon Jan 02, 2017 8:35 pm

Dan,
the heartwood observation definitely rules white pine out in addition to the other characteristics you mentioned. I was skeptical but not sure, thanks for the definitive verdict, this makes perfect sense.

Bob,
yes, i have seen some myself as well, the west Virginia oak comes to mind that was most certainly not an oak, but a redwood or something western at least.

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ElijahW
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Re: Logging Photo, White Pine?

Post by ElijahW » Mon Jan 02, 2017 10:05 pm

Pretty interesting. The bark is OK for Eastern White Pine, and the heartwood color would not rule it out for me, as it could be rotten or just a very old "punkin pine." Assuming the man on the left is of average height, this tree is likely in excess of 5' DBH, not exceptional for a western tree, but virtually unheard of for a forest-grown eastern pine.

The droopy-branched pine in the background could pass for Red Pine, and the fir on the left for Balsam, but the problem for me is the large firs on the right. We have no native firs that large in the East; therefore, this is a western tree. Which western tree it is, I don't know.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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