Re: Florida Tree Species Diversity vrs Appalachia

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Bart Bouricius
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Re: Re: Florida Tree Species Diversity vrs Appalachia

Post by Bart Bouricius » Sat Jan 17, 2015 1:15 pm

I hope other organizations and authors can get on board with this definition, because, it seems like each author uses a different definition of trees. It would be useful also to have a global definition, so global taxonomy could be more consistent in regards to trees. For example, dendrologist Tracey Parker notes in the introduction of her 1033 page 2008 book Trees of Guatemala "the number of species included here is large (2327), swelled further by my personal bias to call any plant taller than I am, and upright on its own stem or stems, a tree". Some authors refuse to include strangler figs, some of which can reach a height of at least 45 meters, because they usually start life as epiphytes in the canopy, even though they usually end up as terrestrially rooted trees. Others use 2 meters (Condit and authors in Trees of Panama and Costa Rica) and some 5 or 6 meters. The additional problem I have run into is that I find in Costa Rica, for example, nettle species that can have woody stems over 30' (9.2 m) tall that are never included as trees. One reason we need good agreed upon definitions is that, as an example, Kouta's geographic comparisons will be easier.

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KoutaR
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Re: Florida Tree Species Diversity vrs Appalachia

Post by KoutaR » Sun Jan 18, 2015 5:05 am

Bart,

A question came to my mind as you mentioned tall nettles: Are there very aggressively stinging plants in the rainforests of Central and South America? About like Dendrocnide moroides in tropical Queensland, a very dangerous shrub even capable to kill a man.

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Bart Bouricius
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Re: Re: Florida Tree Species Diversity vrs Appalachia

Post by Bart Bouricius » Sun Jan 18, 2015 9:29 am

Kouta,

There are poison wood trees and a few species of toxic nettles, but I have not heard of anything that could possibly kill someone who accidentally touched it. It is not something I worry about at all. I would say that the Giant Hog Weed, which is now found in many parts of the US and Europe is worse than anything I have heard about in at least in Central America. Here is a link to a fact sheet on the species: http://ohioline.osu.edu/anr-fact/hogweed.html

Bart

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KoutaR
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Re: Florida Tree Species Diversity vrs Appalachia

Post by KoutaR » Sun Jan 18, 2015 5:52 pm

Indeed, giant hogweed now grows in places in Europe, even as far north as in northern Scandinavia. Very difficult to eradicate permanently.

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Josh Kelly
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Re: Florida Tree Species Diversity vrs Appalachia

Post by Josh Kelly » Mon Jan 19, 2015 10:22 am

Hey GJ,

Those maps are incredible! I work for a non-profit conservation organization in the Southern Blue Ridge and would love to use some of those maps in presentations, etc., with your permission. Very nice work. I especially like the contour maps of species richness.

Regards,
Josh Kelly

www.mountaintrue.org

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gjschmidt
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Re: Re: Florida Tree Species Diversity vrs Appalachia

Post by gjschmidt » Sat Jan 31, 2015 12:53 pm

Josh,
You may use any of the maps on FB or BONAP.org for presentation, with proper attribution to myself and John Kartesz of BONAP. For formal publications, I would refer you to John Kartesz. However, I am probably a couple of weeks away from a whole rewrite of the density gradient page at BONAP. I just have to finish categorizing subcanopy/woodland trees from forest canopy trees and then generate a diversity map. I am thinking of adding a Crataegus map just to show how various named entities may inflate the diversity for trees, some of which occur only in a few counties and are typically ignored by regional floras. I had previously grouped the hawthorn all as shrubs so as not to muddle the tree map. However, I could assign them to the small tree group (assuming that they can regularly exceed 5 m under normal conditions). Incidentally, other new themes will include warm season grass diversity (after I finish categorizing grasses).

-Greg
Greg Schmidt

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