Eastern White Pine Growth Rates and Research Opportunities

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gnmcmartin
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Re: Eastern White Pine Growth Rates and Research Opportuniti

Post by gnmcmartin » Sun Apr 10, 2016 9:36 pm

Turner:

Thanks for the info. If the data reported for 1994 is accurate, the "site index" with this strain would be somewhere near 120. Of course, the 50-year growth rate is not based on an average height in a stand, but on the 4 or 5 tallest per acre. But then we know we might not be able to trust the heights as measured with the method commonly in use. Anyway, that data suggests 120 feet in 50 years, which is about 20 feet better than the typical stand in the area grown from local seed sources.

If you get a chance to get back and do more measurements, that would be very interesting.

The last time I visited that stand could be as much as 20 years ago. The last time I was there, there had just been considerable storm damage at the end of the stand just before the bridge that crosses the stream. I never walked through the pines back some distance in the other direction along the stream, partly because there seemed to be no convenient place to park along that narrow road. I had assumed that these were part of the same planting, but your acreage numbers suggest a much smaller plantation than what I have assumed. I wonder if there is a map available showing just where the trees were planted in 1933. Perhaps the other pines I saw back along the stream were something else. The time to explore the larger area I am talking about would best be when the hardwoods don't have their leaves, affording much better visibility of just where the pines are.

I wish I could run up there and do some exploring, but I can't imagine I could get any time soon--maybe next November. If you could get back there to do some more exploring, I would be very interested.

--Gaines

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