Tree ID Help

Forums discussing individual tree species, tree families across their range, and tree identification questions & guides.

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bbeduhn
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Tree ID Help

Post by bbeduhn » Tue Jul 19, 2011 9:54 am

This pine tree is baffling me. It's present in the Piedmont of North Carolina and I've seen a couple of them in the mountains. This one is south of Weaverville, north of Asheville. Its needles are in groups of two. I haven't found it in any of the four guides I have. It is a small to medium sized pine with deeply furrowed bark and an abundance of cones.
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Larry Tucei
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Re: Tree ID Help

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Jul 19, 2011 2:05 pm

Maybe a Shortleaf Pine, Pinus echinata? Looks similar. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinus_echinata Larry

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bbeduhn
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Re: Tree ID Help

Post by bbeduhn » Tue Jul 19, 2011 2:18 pm

Shortleafs have a different bark and grow a good deal taller. I've ruled out longleaf, pitch, white and virginia as well. It must not be native but it has assimilated in the central part of NC.

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Will Blozan
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Re: Tree ID Help

Post by Will Blozan » Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:48 pm

Brian,

I know where the tree is so next time I am by there I will take a look. What about Pinus nigra? This wouldn't be naturally in SC though... Looks like P. rigida to me. They can have extensive areas of two needles but usually with enough looking you can find three.

Will

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bbeduhn
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Re: Tree ID Help

Post by bbeduhn » Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:52 pm

If that's pitch pine, then I've had pitch pine wrong all along and then have another mystery tree on my hands.

TN_Tree_Man
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Re: Tree ID Help

Post by TN_Tree_Man » Tue Jul 19, 2011 8:26 pm

Brian,

It resembles Japanese black pine (Pinus thunbergiana) particularly with that deeply furrowed bark and the 2-needle fasicle. If that area of Asheville has a landscaping ordinance for business developments (most likely does), I'm betting that they planted that tree. Pitch pine (P. rigida) contains resin chambers that are easily seen on the under side of the bark.

Steve Springer
"One can always identify a dogwood tree by it's bark."

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bbeduhn
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Re: Tree ID Help

Post by bbeduhn » Wed Jul 20, 2011 10:27 am

Thanks. I'm not familiar with any Japanese pines. They must have been planted over large areas in central NC. Will is going to check it out physically when he gets the chance.

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mdavie
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Re: Tree ID Help

Post by mdavie » Sun Jul 24, 2011 3:06 pm

It's a pitch pine, almost certainly. Will's right that often they have a bunch of two-needle bundles.

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Bart Bouricius
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Re: Tree ID Help

Post by Bart Bouricius » Mon Jul 25, 2011 7:03 am

I agree with mdavie and Will, the retained old cones and apparent twigs coming directly off the trunk are two characteristics typical of the Pitch Pines here in Massachusetts.

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bbeduhn
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Re: Tree ID Help

Post by bbeduhn » Mon Jul 25, 2011 8:40 am

The bark is substantially different from the pitch pines I've seen. I can't find anything else that fits it however. Also, the structure of the tree is nothing like pitch pines just 100 yards away. Thanks.

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