beech leaf mining weevil

Discussions and news related to invasive and exotic species affecting our trees and forests.

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#1)  beech leaf mining weevil

Postby Lucas » Thu Jul 27, 2017 12:39 pm

http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/european-ins ... ing-nova...

http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/.../ctv-atla ... ch-7.104...

beech leaf mining weevil

Cripes! I live here and this is the first I heard of this! This is ground zero for beech canker now it is ground zero for this to finish them off.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir
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#2)  Re: beech leaf mining weevil

Postby RayA » Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:42 pm

Lucas,

  The two links you posted are apparently incomplete, they didn't work for me. But I did find a news video on the subject at

http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=1175459


This is another in a long series of introduced problems our trees are facing, which I find very discouraging. It's actually getting more difficult to think of tree species that don't have serious issues than those that do!  Hemlock (adelgids), beech (beech bark disease, weevils), ash (emerald ash borer), elm (Dutch elm), butternut (canker), dogwood (anthracnose), chestnut (blight), white pine (needle cast, etc), oaks (sudden oak death), sycamore (anthracnose), etc, etc.  Globalization doesn't seem to be working out too well, on several levels.

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#3)  Re: beech leaf mining weevil

Postby Joe » Thu Jul 27, 2017 8:27 pm

RayA wrote:Globalization doesn't seem to be working out too well, on several levels.


If we stop importing wood from other continents and got our wood from local, well managed forests, we could avoid some future invasive species problems. And, with a strong forestry industry, we could harvest and dispose of the diseased trees.

but alas, too many people don't like forestry

Of course not all invasive species comes from imported wood- some comes from other plants imported for landscaping and horticultural purposes, or they might hitch a ride with any imported product.

As for the "other levels" I don't care much for globalization. I consider any corporation moving jobs overseas to be no less than traitors. I live in the rust belt of Massachusetts. Empty old brick factory buildings are everywhere.

Joe
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#4)  Re: beech leaf mining weevil

Postby dbhguru » Sat Jul 29, 2017 5:36 pm

Joe,

but alas, too many people don't like forestry  


  I don't know what the status of forestry is with the general public. I've not seen any opinion surveys. However, I believe the vast majority of the people in NTS respect the profession of forestry and recognize its value to society. Some Ents are foresters, and we are all wood users. But NTS, as you have yourself acknowledged, is not about forestry. It is about the celebration of trees and what attracts us most are trees with interesting forms, history, great size, longevity, etc. Seedings, saplings, and young pole-sized trees may be economically important in the context of growing trees for commercial purposes, but they don't fire our imaginations.

  As to how aesthetic an actively managed woodland can be made, that is a worthy topic to discuss on the BBS. Photos are important. In the video that Ray and I are doing on old growth, we intend to show images of younger forests for comparison purposes. It would serve the educational purpose of the video to show some images of well managed forests as a counterbalance to what is often seen after logging operations.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
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Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
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#5)  Re: beech leaf mining weevil

Postby Joe » Sun Jul 30, 2017 7:21 am

Bob, as you know, over the years I uploaded countless photos of some of my forestry work- not much in this forum, but in the almost daily emails with the so called Mass. "forestry community". But I don't have them organized since I no longer have a web site. But forester Mike Leonard from Petersham, MA has an awesome Facebook photo album site at https://www.facebook.com/pg/MikeLeonard ... tab=albums

It's actually a series of albums. I don't think there's a better forestry web site on the planet. I've seen many of the properties shown in these albums. Of course even this excellent work- excellent to foresters, will not be liked by some of the general public but they need to realize if they like wood- it's gotta come from somewhere and there's no way for the work to be without an impact. When done well, the impact is short term. The harvested trees can't just float into the sky and fly off to the sawmill. Some nice looking trees will get cut. Big machines will be used. Skid trails are everywhere. The forest will look different. But anyone who can't handle this should live in a plastic/cement/steel house with cement furniture and give up all paper products including toilet paper. :)

But I'm always the first to say that most logging is poorly done- which is why I've been the Che  Guevera of the forestry world since the day I started- fighting against bad logging- and that's why I can never afford to retire. Those who sing the party line get soft jobs with big salaries and retire with few grey hairs.

Joe
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#6)  Re: beech leaf mining weevil

Postby dbhguru » Sun Jul 30, 2017 11:09 am

Joe,

   There isn't any disagreement between us as to the importance of good forestry. The question for us at the outset was should the Eastern Native Tree Society become a voice in forestry debates that were raging at the the time, courtesy of the northern spotted owl and other species endangered by logging the last of the great Pacific Coast forests that weren't protected? We strayed into that territory once and its extensions to Massachusetts, and it didn't work because those issues, however valid in the right forum, weren't why we established ENTS or its current incarnation as NTS. We have to stay focused or we become irrelevant to what we set out to accomplish. We can't allow ourselves to become immersed in politics, religion, social issues, etc. Any of those forums would be the kiss of death.

   A borderline issue is to what extent does NTS become a voice in forest preservation issues since many of us have been involved in conservation and preservation for years, or in my case, decades. Again, other than grumblings about an issue here or there, that is not our mission. As a consequence, you won't find many hardcore environmentalists on board as participating members of the BBS. Almost none. That once bothered me, but I accept that they believe that their focus must stay on the politics. Can't they be in NTS for NTS purposes and in other forums for their primary mission? Well, they can, but they aren't.

  As you know, a major mission of NTS over the years has been to bring truth into the big tree numbers. I would argue that given the impact we currently have attained in American Forests and in a number of active state champion tree programs, that we've been successful. As just one example, Don Bertolette and I are currently working closely withe the Texas champion tree program and training them in a variety of measuring techniques. On Thursday, I was on a conference call with three of them for well over an hour hashing out methods for measuring gobsmackers. Very successful.

  In summary, I would ask: does the focus of NTS matter to the majority of timber professionals and environmentalists - at all levels? Apparently not. But from my perspective, it's their loss.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder and Executive Director
Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
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