Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Discussions of trees and forests of historical importance or simply of exceptional trees. Discussions should also be cloned into the appropriate location section of the BBS.

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

Joe

Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Joe » Tue Apr 30, 2013 6:34 am

Rand wrote:
dbhguru wrote:Ed,

We have accustomed ourselves to a landscape with small trees as the norm.
It's amazing how quick one can become acclimated too. After spending several weeks running around the redwoods and sequoias, just walking around my local ohio neighborhood was an almost claustrophobic experience. Like walking under some oversized weeds or something.
Well, imagine North America before the violent, deranged, nature hating pale faces showed up. They perceived the natives as savages- but those lucky savages lived in a natural paradise. If only I had a time machine- I'd go back and walk the entire continent. One spot I'd stop at would be Manhatten- I'd love to see it as an old growth forest with streams, ponds, big animals. As much as I find NYC fascinating today, it would have been more fascinating pre pale face.
Joe

User avatar
Don
Posts: 1569
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:42 am

Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Don » Wed May 01, 2013 1:43 am

Joe-
Your post above made me think of a movie that I have liked well enough to watch it more than once, has a geographical connection to your comments, and a director's interpretation of the 'natives as savages' and their relationship with nature.
It's called "The Black Robe". Should be a cheap rental, it's been out for several decades.
-Don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

Joe

Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Joe » Wed May 01, 2013 6:27 am

Don wrote:Joe-
Your post above made me think of a movie that I have liked well enough to watch it more than once, has a geographical connection to your comments, and a director's interpretation of the 'natives as savages' and their relationship with nature.
It's called "The Black Robe". Should be a cheap rental, it's been out for several decades.
-Don
oh, I've watched it at least 3 times- I think I have a copy too

it's probably one of the first films to portray Indians is a realistic way

BTW, at a used bookstore I just discovered - I had a field day finding lots of coffee table books which I prefer- including one, "Visions of the First Americans" by Edward S. Curtis. I believe there are several versions of his book(s) in production- I bought one years ago but this version has different photos. I can stare for hours at these photos. These are people who had real character, not like so many people I see in my rust belt town who look beaten down, are obese and who just look like they don't have a clue.

I greatly prefer a world of stone age people- with far fewer people and mostly wilderness.
Joe

User avatar
Don
Posts: 1569
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:42 am

Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Don » Wed May 01, 2013 8:12 pm

Joe-
Your mention of Edward S. Curtis reminded me that the Library of Congress (online) has a fairly complete selection of his photos. Free to the public (online) one can download scans of the originals. A friend data-mined the L of C, transferred their scans onto internegs, and offered them up on eBay, initially as images on plotter paper, then later bypassed hardcopy, and sold them on CD/DVDs.
Might be worth looking into if you really like Curtis' work! Such mining is addictive though, there's all kinds of interesting/fascinating stuff there...
-Don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

Joe

Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Joe » Thu May 02, 2013 4:31 am

Don wrote:Joe-
Your mention of Edward S. Curtis reminded me that the Library of Congress (online) has a fairly complete selection of his photos. Free to the public (online) one can download scans of the originals. A friend data-mined the L of C, transferred their scans onto internegs, and offered them up on eBay, initially as images on plotter paper, then later bypassed hardcopy, and sold them on CD/DVDs.
Might be worth looking into if you really like Curtis' work! Such mining is addictive though, there's all kinds of interesting/fascinating stuff there...
-Don
Don, I never thought of looking for his stuff online but that's great. I have a huge clip art collection which I delve into every time I write a forestry mgt. plan- maybe I'll put a Curtis photo in one!
Joe

User avatar
Lucas
Posts: 837
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2014 11:55 am

Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Lucas » Mon May 11, 2015 1:25 pm


Click on image to see its original size

http://sycamorelandtrust.org/ridgway


Click on image to see its original size

I read the Ridgway articles. The Wabash sounds amazing as the above pix suggest.

Does anyone know where to see all of his pix on line?

http://forestry.about.com/cs/foresthist ... _trees.htm

There are some here and there must be more somewhere wlse.

He seems confused by a very tall oak he calls scarlet oak. Was that really Cherrybark?
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

User avatar
Will Blozan
Posts: 1153
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:13 pm

Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Will Blozan » Mon May 11, 2015 2:41 pm

The first picture is a shumard oak. Parts of Bealls woods look very similar to the last photo.

Will

User avatar
Don
Posts: 1569
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:42 am

Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Don » Mon May 11, 2015 3:22 pm

This thread may be a good segue to address Joe Z's question in another thread, "Why do we care about accurately measuring the dimensions of our largest trees"?
In the second- and third-growth world that is much of North America, and especially the the Eastern US with its longer history of habitation, we don't see what the remaining species are capable of. From a purely economic viewpoint, forester's should want to know what the species they're managing are capable of, if for no other reason than to manage for the highest profit.
But that should only be a part of why we should know what tree species are capable of. It is in our few remaining old-growth ecosystems that we find the breadth of diversity that provides the resilience that enables the ecosystems to survive natural disturbance regimes. That in itself is enough for me...
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

User avatar
Lucas
Posts: 837
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2014 11:55 am

Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Lucas » Tue May 12, 2015 2:05 pm

http://www.amazon.com/Coastal-Wildernes ... 911&sr=1-1

Some of Ridgeway's images are in the Amazon preview of this book.

Does anyone know how many he took of the Wabash trees and where they are on line?

Likewise for the Nichols ones of the Colebrook, CT stand, etc?
Last edited by Lucas on Tue May 12, 2015 2:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

User avatar
Lucas
Posts: 837
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2014 11:55 am

Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Lucas » Tue May 12, 2015 2:11 pm

Will Blozan wrote:The first picture is a shumard oak. Parts of Bealls woods look very similar to the last photo.

Will
It was captioned as a Shumard in several places. Maybe it was Shumard he was confused by, since at that time is was not keyed out as a species?

I think he said it reached 165+.

Are his heights considered reliable by ENTS?
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

Post Reply

Return to “History and Historical Great Trees”