Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Discussions of trees and forests of historical importance or simply of exceptional trees. Discussions should also be cloned into the appropriate location section of the BBS.

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

greenent22
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Joined: Sun Oct 24, 2010 12:23 am

Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by greenent22 » Fri Oct 29, 2010 3:00 am

mdavie wrote:Check it!
I was always stunned by that tulip and chesnut photo, the pecan is a new one for me, wow.

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bbeduhn
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Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 4:23 pm

Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by bbeduhn » Wed Feb 16, 2011 3:39 pm

Here's a link to a giant sycamore stump in Kokomo, IN. It was dug up and is displayed indoors, next to a giant steer.

http://www.roadsideamerica.com/story/3343

RyanLeClair
Posts: 302
Joined: Thu May 20, 2010 8:45 pm

Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by RyanLeClair » Sat May 28, 2011 11:27 pm

It's interesting that Scarlet Oak was grouped with Liriodendron as "one of the tallest trees" (in the PDF file). Aren't the tallest Scarlet Oaks of today in the 130s or so? They surely aren't comparing with Tulip Trees, or everyone would know. Interesting.

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mdavie
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Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by mdavie » Tue Dec 04, 2012 4:52 pm

I did just find an image of one of the tuliptrees from the Centennial Exposition in Nashville:
http://books.google.com/books?id=RZcBLT ... e&q&f=true

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edfrank
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Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by edfrank » Tue Dec 04, 2012 6:59 pm

mdavie wrote:I did just find an image of one of the tuliptrees from the Centennial Exposition in Nashville:
http://books.google.com/books?id=RZcBLT ... e&q&f=true
Mike,

Cool that you found a photo of the tuliptree log. I wish it was from a source we could reprint in the magazine. The ten foot diameter Clearly must be including the basal flair at the bottom of the log section as it does not look to be that fat where the man is standing.

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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