Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

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mdavie
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Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by mdavie » Thu Aug 05, 2010 9:51 pm


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edfrank
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Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by edfrank » Fri Aug 06, 2010 12:42 am

Michael,

Neat stuff and some really impressive trees. This document tis in the public domain and was digitized by Google. People who want to download the file may do so at the link Mike Provided:
http://books.google.com/books?id=gV1DAA ... rch&f=true
photgraphslargetrees.JPG
The entire file is about 41 MB in size. I used a program to print the relevant pages into a single pdf file, but that is itself 26 MB in size and too large to upload to the BBS.

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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edfrank
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Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by edfrank » Fri Aug 06, 2010 6:29 pm

Here is a doc version of the article. The original text and photos are sharper.
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the Journal of Heredity.doc
(2.53 MiB) Downloaded 186 times
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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mdavie
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Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by mdavie » Sat Aug 07, 2010 10:05 am

Also from that article (I thought I had already posted this? But, anyway), about sycamores:
But the biggest record is that left by Robert Ridgway, who found the prostrate and largely decayed trunk of a sycamore near Mount Carmel. in Illinois, the crumbling base of which measured 66 feet in cireumference.3 At 20 feet from this, where the trunk divided into three large limbs, its cireumference was apparently 62 feet. There is certainly no other broad-leaved tree on record in North America which equals these dimensions.

3 Proc. U. S. Nat. Museum, 1882, p. 288.


Apparently Robert Ridgeway, an ornithologist and curator of the National Museum, did a survey of the area around Mt. Carmel, near where he grew up; I believe there are also records of a very large tuliptree and some other trees from around there.


From another spot in Google books, "The Garden: An Illusatrated Weekly", January 1898, pp. 69:
http://books.google.com/books?id=9ibmAA ... &q&f=false 17 MB

Wood Of Tulip Tree.—In the display of timbers representing 118 varieties made at the Nashville Exposition by the Nashville, Chattanooga, and St. Louis Railroad, and occupying 10,000 square feet of floor space and a large outside area, are two remarkable specimens of Yellow Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera). One of these is a log 42 feet long, 10 feet 4 inches in diameter at the butt, and 7 feet in diameter at the smaller end. This specimen contains 1260 cubic feet and is about 600 years old. The other specimen is 48 feet long with an average diameter of 7 feet.
(added by Ed Frank)
(added by Ed Frank)
.

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dbhguru
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Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by dbhguru » Sat Aug 07, 2010 12:04 pm

Mike,Ed, Will, et al,

Thanks, Mike. We're in your debt for finding this. One point, I'm puzzled by the 1,260-ft cubic volume of the big tuliptree log (10.3 ' diam at one end, 7' diam at other, length 42 feet). Conservatively assuming a neiloid shape for the entire log, the volume should be just about 1,875 cubes. I wonder how they arrived at the 1,260 number. Were the shape conical, the volume would be almost 2,500 cubes. What am I missing?

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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James Parton
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Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by James Parton » Sat Aug 07, 2010 1:01 pm

Bob,

One big difference between them and us is that they are not ENTS! We are stcklers on numbers and accuracy. ENTS rule!

James
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

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mdavie
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Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by mdavie » Sat Aug 07, 2010 7:48 pm

Bob, I don't know how the math is supposed to add up on that. Perhaps you could dig up some more original source material about the Nashville Expo? The most I know about it, having grown up in Nashville, is that they built the Parthenon replica for it. Which is admittedly pretty cool.

About that Ridgeway report- I tried finding the proceedings of the National Museum from that year, how annoying that only 1883 was available!

But really, how great is it that we can find scanned books and periodicals from so far back?

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edfrank
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Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by edfrank » Sat Aug 07, 2010 8:56 pm

Mike,

It is available here:
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/31825#7
rideway_cover.JPG
rideway_cover.JPG (19.35 KiB) Viewed 3907 times
Article runs from page 49 to 88.
Article runs from page 49 to 88.
ridgeway_75.JPG
I am downloading the pdf of the full article, but it is 9.6 MB in size and can't be posted here. It contains interesting information on dozens of tree species and should provide a good historical perspective for anyone working in the region, even if the numbers may be somewhat suspect.

For thirty days or so it can be downloaded here:
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/pdf3 ... 031825.pdf

I have attached an OCR verison of the text generated at the site, but it has not been proofed and has numnerous errors from the scanning, but for the most part it is readable.

Ed Frank
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Ridgeway_OCR.doc
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"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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mdavie
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Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by mdavie » Sat Aug 07, 2010 9:27 pm

Thanks, Ed. that is a truly fascinating read.

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edfrank
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Re: Photographs of Large Trees (1915)

Post by edfrank » Sat Aug 07, 2010 9:49 pm

Michael,

I can find things on the internet, but only if someone points out that they are there. Please keep looking for neat stuff like this, I would never have known to look the journal up if you hadn't found the reference.

I did find the Botanical Gazette, June 1880, Page 70 refered to in the above passage:

Some Big Trees Of Indiana -- In Case's Botanical Index for
bg70.JPG
bg70.JPG (29.2 KiB) Viewed 3899 times
Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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