Looking back, marching onward

The Eastern Native Tree Society is a chapter of the NTS focusing on the trees and forests of Eastern United States and Canada. This forum is for discussions of the ENTS chapter itself including meetings, events, and operations.

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

Post Reply
User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4508
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Looking back, marching onward

Post by dbhguru » Tue Jun 14, 2011 11:48 am

ENTS,

Here it is almost the middle of 2011 and time to take stock. We have a lot going on. Looking back, we have visited a number of new sites like Morristown National Historic Park in NJ. We have made some astounding discoveries/confirmations like the world's tallest tuliptree. We have completed some important projects such as modeling of the Poplar Forest tuliptree. The BBS, website, and Bulletin continue to be outstanding. The ENTS tree database is functional. We have begun the video on tree measuring. We have an empowered European arm that adds true class to ENTS. We have stellar performers in the scientific community to impart credibility to our efforts. I can hear big Ed saying, see Bob, I told you so, and he's right.

Looking forward, Neil's tuliptree article, which he is graciously including me as a coauthor, is about finished. Gary Beluzo and I are planning the 7th Forest Summit and 2011 ENTS rendezvous. Soon Don Bertolette and I will host the second annual rendezvous of WNTS. And Don plans to present an avant garde tree measuring guide on his Alaska champion tree website. I am beginning a project to photographically document MTSF and MSF as a joint FMTSF/ENTS-DCR partnership. I will also be training DCR personnel who certify champion trees in tree measuring techniques. Will and company have begun the special tuliptree project for the GSMNP. Big Larry continues to roll as he documents more and more of those wonderful live oaks. Steve and Rand continue rolling across the Ohio countryside, changing our notion of what the Buckeye State still has to offer. Eli does similarly for central Georgia. The list goes on and on.

It would be hard to argue with our successes, and I think we're going to continue on an upward path. Amidst all the bad economic and environmental news, our successes are a breath of fresh air. We have held our focus and success is paying dividends as our numbers increase. Is there any area where I'd like to see us expand operations? Well, yes, I surely hope we can attract more serious tree measurers so that we can expand our list of outstanding forest sites and build a tree database of accurate measurements others that will suffice for scientific research. I see little evidence that outside groups and individuals are going to pick up the slack. Let's face it, tree measuring is our niche and we hare unique in our abilities to locate tall tree sites and convert them to indices that foster meaningful comparisons. With a very few exceptions, the champion tree programs can't do that. It is not in the nature of academic research to focus on maximums for their own sake. Forestry is about growing trees and cutting them at an age and size that falls well short of our interests. So, who, if not ENTS, will continue to perfect tree measuring and piece together the picture of what each species does and where across its full range. Answer is nobody.

So what, if anything stand between us an an expanded tree measuring mission. Over the long run, probably nothing. If we keep our noses to the grindstone, we'll get there. But in the near term progress will continue to be slow unless we can establish hooks into communities that have at least a potential interest in what we do. I've tried to make connections into the schools and almost succeeded twice. But it is a tough sell. There is always initial enthusiasm and interest, but the efforts never quite get off the ground. I'm open to ideas. How can we move the measuring boat forward to attract a much wider audience? And where are the lady measurers? Why is this almost exclusively an old boy occupation? Just wondering.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

User avatar
edfrank
Posts: 4217
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 5:46 pm

Re: Looking back, marching onward

Post by edfrank » Sat Jul 09, 2011 7:50 pm

Bob,

It is curious about what posts receive responses. I had tagged this as one of the best essays from June, and yet this is the first response to the post you have received. I guess it is easier to respond to posts dealing with sites or something concrete as opposed to more philosophical essays. It is also a curious question about men versus women in the group. There is limited participation or posting even in the non-measurement forums. I am not sure what we could do to spur participation by the female contingent. On the NTS Facebook page the ratio is 56% Men, 36% Women and 6% Other (maybe groups or other pages.) We certainly do not have nearly that high of a percentage of women posting to the BBS.

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4508
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Looking back, marching onward

Post by dbhguru » Sat Jul 09, 2011 8:42 pm

Ed,

You bring up a topic that has puzzled me for a long time - female participation. We value our female members enormously, and encourage them to post. I'm unsure why their BBS participation in terms of posts doesn't match their percentage of membership. Maybe some of our valued female members will cast light on the subject. What have we been doing wrong? ENTS is absolutely not an old boy's club. But maybe it appears that way. If so, what do we need to do to reverse the appearance?

Yes, I was mightily surprised that the post didn't elicit more responses. I'm sure many Ents have well developed thoughts on all points raised. Maybe they saw no need. I'd like to think so.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

User avatar
Larry Tucei
Posts: 2017
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 10:44 am

Re: Looking back, marching onward

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Jul 12, 2011 7:47 am

Bob, I have now documented 167 Live Oaks and will reach around 300 someday. Some of my postings don't get much viewing either, I'm getting used to it. I really don't mind if people don't comment on mine I do it for enjoyment. The reason for lack of women on ENTS maybe because it's not their cup of tea. Men hunt, hike, fish, explore more than women do and it has been that way forever. Our ancestors had to survive in the wilderness and struggled to do so. Only the strong survived back in the old days. Women bore us and rasied our offspring, which kept them real busy. I've brought my Mom,girlfriend, cousins and daughter to big trees many times. I've also taken them into Forests. They enjoy them but not like I do. I'm not saying it's because I'm male, maybe I'm wrong but most women enjoy nature but just don't get out into it like men do. One more note some of the younger generation doesn't seen to think of trees like the older. They seem to have forgotten our natural heritage. This is just one point of view to think on, I hope I did not upset anyone by giving my thought on this topic. Larry

User avatar
James Parton
Posts: 1576
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2010 5:47 pm

Re: Looking back, marching onward

Post by James Parton » Tue Jul 12, 2011 10:00 am

Larry,

I always read your posts. You are the Live Oak Lord ( LOL!! ). I would like to see more women join the ranks of ENTS. Women have a place in the great outdoors and besides, when they are there, Gods two most beautiful creations are in one place. Women and Trees!
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4508
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Looking back, marching onward

Post by dbhguru » Wed Jul 13, 2011 8:50 am

Larry, James,

Yep, Larry, you are Live-Oak-Larry (LOL).

Pursuing the female Ent discussion, over the decades, women have been some of our top conservationists. They are often sensitive to the beauty and importance of an area when all the men want to do is go after its natural resources. Maybe what it comes down to is that women are more into the qualitative aspects and less so in the quantitative. From a public perspective, people like John Muir were the ones who got the attention, but I keep coming across out-of-the-way places that were recognized and preserved by some small, determined woman, who was only locally known, but prevailed against a lot of opposition.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

ribbons
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Mar 26, 2010 8:27 am

Re: Looking back, marching onward

Post by ribbons » Wed Jul 13, 2011 10:29 am

Larry,
I don't often have the time to reply to posts (I am a graduate student in forestry/forest ecology), but I do read them. I was surprised to see your post that women just don't get into nature the way men do. I respectfully have to disagree. Yes, there are women with no interest in being outside in a forest, just as there are men with a similar lack of interest in the outdoors. I don't think its fair to say that women don't enjoy forests as much as men- even at a general level. Just my thoughts.

To the group generally,
There could be a lot of reasons why women aren't posting to the group as much, perhaps they feel more observational rather than conversational. It is through conversation that we are able to share knowledge and ideas, but it is through observation first that we can have informed conversations. This is just my take on the situation, I am only one woman's voice. I don't think ENTS in an old boys club, and never got that impression, even if men are the primary discussion posters. This may be a reflection of my worldview and upbringing: people are people (I was raised as a person rather than as a girl if that makes sense).

The main reason I don't post more is I am at a stage in my career when I don't have the time to devote to group as actively as other members. I know some very passionate and devoted tree-loving women are out there, just maybe not able to post here on ENTS very often.

~Relena

Post Reply

Return to “Eastern Native Tree Society”