Name that Tree

A place for posting games, contests, and quizzes related to trees and forests.

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

#1)  Name that Tree

Postby bbeduhn » Wed Mar 18, 2015 3:46 pm

               
                       
oak gum or persimmon 1.jpg
                       
?
               
               
I'm not entirely certain of the ID but I do not believe it is what it appears to be.  I'll follow up with a crown pic and the habitat after I see several guesses.
User avatar
bbeduhn
 
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 5:23 pm
Location: Asheville, NC
Has Liked: 1103 times
Has Been Liked: 474 times
Print view this post

#2)  Re: Name that Tree

Postby Larry Tucei » Wed Mar 18, 2015 4:30 pm

Brain=  Looks like Black Cherry.    Larry
User avatar
Larry Tucei
 
Posts: 1813
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 11:44 am
Location: Southern Mississippi
Has Liked: 685 times
Has Been Liked: 579 times
Print view this post

#3)  Re: Name that Tree

Postby Erik Danielsen » Wed Mar 18, 2015 4:48 pm

To be honest the cracks-on-dried-mud texture of this bark reminds me not at all of black cherry, more like some photos I've seen of black tupelo bark. We don't have any here though so I'm not personally familiar.

Whatever it is, chances are it doesn't grow where I live because I've never seen anything like it in person; we do however have black cherry up the wazoo out here. My only other way-longshot-guess would be a white pine individual with particularly odd bark, mostly just based on the color and texture of the flat surfaces.
User avatar
Erik Danielsen
 
Posts: 549
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 6:46 pm
Location: NYC
Has Liked: 239 times
Has Been Liked: 299 times
Print view this post

#4)  Re: Name that Tree

Postby RayA » Wed Mar 18, 2015 5:34 pm

I'll take a shot at it ... persimmon.
User avatar
RayA
 
Posts: 172
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 11:21 am
Location: WMass
Has Liked: 13 times
Has Been Liked: 87 times
Print view this post

#5)  Re: Name that Tree

Postby DougBidlack » Wed Mar 18, 2015 9:31 pm

My first guess is also persimmon but since you say it isn't what it appears to be I'll make some other guesses.  Black tupelo was also mentioned and although it rarely has this type of bark in southeastern MA, I know that it can get like this.  I once saw a tree in Michigan that I thought looked like a persimmon but that species is not native to Michigan so my best guess was blue ash.  Black tupelo loves acid soil and blue ash doesn't and I'm guessing that the soils where your tree was growing were acidic.

Anyway, here are some pictures of the odd tree that I thought might be a blue ash.
               
                       
Bark4.jpg
                                       
               

               
                       
Bark5.jpg
                                       
               

               
                       
Bark6.jpg
                                       
               


There are several other species that can get bark like that, especially under drier conditions but they don't fit for one reason or another.  Flowering dogwood is too small and both black and white oak are too big.  I've also seen black walnut with bark similar to this but it doesn't seem quite right, is usually too big, and like blue ash it likes the calcium rich more circumneutral soils.  I wish I knew more about some of the species down your way that we don't get, especially all the possible variations.  I can't wait to find out the identity of your tree.

Doug
User avatar
DougBidlack
 
Posts: 337
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 5:14 pm
Location: Dighton, MA
Has Liked: 0 times
Has Been Liked: 186 times
Print view this post

#6)  Re: Name that Tree

Postby John Harvey » Wed Mar 18, 2015 10:47 pm

At first glance I thought flowering dogwood, until I saw the other photos.
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox
User avatar
John Harvey
 
Posts: 722
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 9:25 pm
Location: Northern California but from South Jersey
Has Liked: 348 times
Has Been Liked: 433 times
Print view this post

#7)  Re: Name that Tree

Postby bbeduhn » Thu Mar 19, 2015 9:22 am

Doug,
Ashes can be variable.  In the Southern Apps., Biltmore ash is incredibly variable, even within the same tree.  I've confused it with black gum (tupelo) and persimmon.  

My tree in question stood out as a persimmon to me at first, but I was wondering why it was at this high of an altitude and in a dry environment.  Also, there were no persimmons down below along the stream, where I'd expect to find them.  I then considered the actual species and black oak, but the crown didn't fit black oak and wasn't even close to persimmon.  The crown didn't look like the actual species from what I've seen but I've concentrated on older specimens.  The correct species was mentioned...good eyes, Erik and Doug--black gum or black tupelo (nyssa sylvatica).
               
                       
oak gum or persimmon 2.jpg
                       
Name that crown
               
               


I didn't see any of these along the stream, just on a very dry, west facing slope dominated by table mountain pine and mountain laurel with some very old chestnut oaks.
User avatar
bbeduhn
 
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 5:23 pm
Location: Asheville, NC
Has Liked: 1103 times
Has Been Liked: 474 times
Print view this post

#8)  Re: Name that Tree

Postby DougBidlack » Thu Mar 19, 2015 9:38 am

Brian,

I love the branching structure of black tupelo!

I was also going to add that if the tree could have been a non-native tree in an area that was once settled it might also be a common pear tree as I've seen some fairly large examples of this species at long abandoned sites and they have that wonderful bark pattern as well.

Doug
User avatar
DougBidlack
 
Posts: 337
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 5:14 pm
Location: Dighton, MA
Has Liked: 0 times
Has Been Liked: 186 times
Print view this post

#9)  Re: Name that Tree

Postby Will Blozan » Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:48 pm

Brian,

FYI- several 100'+ persimmons on the way in to Curtis Creek... I have found them in the Smokies above 4,000', and in the Chattooga watershed over 3,000'. They are not restricted to floodplains by any means.

Will

For this message the author Will Blozan has received Likes :
bbeduhn
User avatar
Will Blozan
 
Posts: 1151
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 8:13 pm
Location: North Carolina
Has Liked: 1553 times
Has Been Liked: 440 times
Print view this post

#10)  Re: Name that Tree

Postby bbeduhn » Wed Apr 15, 2015 10:04 am

Time for another installment of "Name that Tree".  I have a pretty good idea on this one but am not certain if it's right.  It grows near the blackgum I posted earlier in the thread.  I saw two of these as well.  They are in the 25' range in height, appear to have compound leaves (just sprouting, had to squint to see if they really were compound), grows on a very dry ridge with black gum, pitch pine, table mtn pine, shortleaf pine, chestnut oak and mountain laurel.
               
                       
red hickory.jpg
                       
?
               
               
User avatar
bbeduhn
 
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 5:23 pm
Location: Asheville, NC
Has Liked: 1103 times
Has Been Liked: 474 times
Print view this post

Next

Return to Games, Contests, Quizzes, and Humor

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron