Recommended tools?

General discussions of measurement techniques and the results of testing of techniques and equipment.

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Bart Bouricius
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Re: Recommended tools?

Post by Bart Bouricius » Wed Oct 28, 2015 6:53 am

There are currently 3 used Nikon 440 rangefinders available on e-bay. It doesn't matter what they say they are for, simply whether they work well for our purposes. You can get one now on e-bay for 100 bucks. I have bought 7 used of this model. All worked fine. I have given some to friends in Peru and Panama.

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sradivoy
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Re: Recommended tools?

Post by sradivoy » Wed Nov 04, 2015 4:28 pm

bbeduhn wrote:The one yard accuracy is actually just fine. With that situation, you just have to move forward or backward to the clickover point to get an accurate reading. The Nikon Riflehunter and Bowhunter each have .1 yard accuracy and can shoot a little shorter than the typical 10 meter (10.5 yard) minimum. These will run in the $300 range however.
Brian,
I've never used the technique of moving forward or backward to get a more accurate reading. Is there a way of simultaneously obtaining a clickpoint distance for both the top and bottom hypotenuse from the same position? One accurate distance might negatively affect the other, and vice versa. I see how you can get one but not both, except in rare instances.
Stefan

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Will Blozan
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Re: Recommended tools?

Post by Will Blozan » Wed Nov 04, 2015 7:03 pm

sradivoy wrote:
bbeduhn wrote:The one yard accuracy is actually just fine. With that situation, you just have to move forward or backward to the clickover point to get an accurate reading. The Nikon Riflehunter and Bowhunter each have .1 yard accuracy and can shoot a little shorter than the typical 10 meter (10.5 yard) minimum. These will run in the $300 range however.
Brian,
I've never used the technique of moving forward or backward to get a more accurate reading. Is there a way of simultaneously obtaining a clickpoint distance for both the top and bottom hypotenuse from the same position? One accurate distance might negatively affect the other, and vice versa. I see how you can get one but not both, except in rare instances.
Stefan
As long as your relative position on the level remains the same you can do click-over for both triangles. However, they would be separately done as it is unlikely both top and base would be at the same point.

-Will

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bbeduhn
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Re: Recommended tools?

Post by bbeduhn » Thu Nov 05, 2015 9:06 am

In addition to what Will stated, click over points become more important the farther you are from a tree. On a steep slope it can be a bit tricky because you want to make sure both shots are from the same height on the ground. On level ground you can move around more freely. On a steep slope you need to move left or right in most instances. Without using the click over point you can still get a fairly accurate reading but you'll be short changing the overall height anywhere from inches to a couple of feet, unless you are very far away, then you may be short changing the overall height by a yard or more.

At distance, the clinometer reading becomes more important. It's helpful if you lean against a solid object. Michael Taylor uses a tripod so that the clinometer stops completely and he can read to a tenth with dead on accuracy (he may be using a built in digital clinometer). A tenth of a degree doesn't change things much if you are very close but if you have to be a hundred yards out or more on a redwood it can make a very significant difference.

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sradivoy
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Re: Recommended tools?

Post by sradivoy » Thu Nov 05, 2015 1:58 pm

Thanks for the feedback! These are all important considerations that I've never considered before. Now If i can only only prevent my head from bobbing up and down while looking into the clinometer (on a tripod) I'll be all set.

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DAKennedy
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Re: Recommended tools?

Post by DAKennedy » Thu Nov 05, 2015 3:56 pm

bbeduhn wrote:In addition to what Will stated, click over points become more important the farther you are from a tree. On a steep slope it can be a bit tricky because you want to make sure both shots are from the same height on the ground. On level ground you can move around more freely. On a steep slope you need to move left or right in most instances. Without using the click over point you can still get a fairly accurate reading but you'll be short changing the overall height anywhere from inches to a couple of feet, unless you are very far away, then you may be short changing the overall height by a yard or more.

At distance, the clinometer reading becomes more important. It's helpful if you lean against a solid object. Michael Taylor uses a tripod so that the clinometer stops completely and he can read to a tenth with dead on accuracy (he may be using a built in digital clinometer). A tenth of a degree doesn't change things much if you are very close but if you have to be a hundred yards out or more on a redwood it can make a very significant difference.
I'll have a chance to see that first-hand, as Taylor and I are planning to find and measure the gigantic Collins Ponderosa in Tehama County tomorrow.

I will keep these ideas in mind. That will help me use my rangefinder when I get it on the 13th (for my 14th birthday).
Duncan Kennedy
Student, University of Nevada - Reno; Biotech dept.
Tree Measurer.
http://sierracountybigtrees.wordpress.com/

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sradivoy
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Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2011 8:23 pm

Re: Recommended tools?

Post by sradivoy » Fri Nov 06, 2015 6:00 am

DAKennedy wrote:
bbeduhn wrote:In addition to what Will stated, click over points become more important the farther you are from a tree. On a steep slope it can be a bit tricky because you want to make sure both shots are from the same height on the ground. On level ground you can move around more freely. On a steep slope you need to move left or right in most instances. Without using the click over point you can still get a fairly accurate reading but you'll be short changing the overall height anywhere from inches to a couple of feet, unless you are very far away, then you may be short changing the overall height by a yard or more.

At distance, the clinometer reading becomes more important. It's helpful if you lean against a solid object. Michael Taylor uses a tripod so that the clinometer stops completely and he can read to a tenth with dead on accuracy (he may be using a built in digital clinometer). A tenth of a degree doesn't change things much if you are very close but if you have to be a hundred yards out or more on a redwood it can make a very significant difference.
I'll have a chance to see that first-hand, as Taylor and I are planning to find and measure the gigantic Collins Ponderosa in Tehama County tomorrow.

I will keep these ideas in mind. That will help me use my rangefinder when I get it on the 13th (for my 14th birthday).
Congratulations Duncan! We're all envious. More than anything you exemplify "the kid" in us all. This has nothing to do with you being to young, but rather everything to do with us never growing up. This eternal "youthful vigor" that big tree hunting instills is perhaps its greatest gift. Often times I find myself as tall as the surrounding trees because of it.

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DAKennedy
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Re: Recommended tools?

Post by DAKennedy » Fri Nov 06, 2015 8:43 pm

I got to meet and talk to Michael, but he had already long measured the height and volume on it by the time we got there. Apparently he had left his home at about 4 AM, because he couldn't sleep thanks to a raging toothache. One of us will probably have to write up a trip report on the tree and its stats.

- Duncan
Duncan Kennedy
Student, University of Nevada - Reno; Biotech dept.
Tree Measurer.
http://sierracountybigtrees.wordpress.com/

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