Stick Method #1

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Matt Markworth
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Stick Method #1

Post by Matt Markworth » Sat Jul 18, 2015 3:55 pm

NTS,

Here's a quick video I made discussing Stick Method #1.

The goal isn't to provide a step-by-step demonstration video, but rather to briefly demonstrate the method and discuss some of the potential sources of error. I may do something similar for some of the other measurement methods.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgBu7R7v6ng
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgBu7R7v6ng

The tree is a pin oak:
pin oak.JPG
Matt

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dbhguru
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Re: Stick Method #1

Post by dbhguru » Sat Jul 18, 2015 7:15 pm

Matt,

A really fine video. Very easy to follow. We congratulate you. A series of such videos could be made available through the American Forests website if you are game. The more we can load up the AF website with learning materials like your video, the quicker we'll make converts from places we haven't been reaching, since many visitors to AF automatically give that source full credence. Since you are Cadre, your voice will be given extra respect. It is a case of directing our efforts toward the media source with the highest standing.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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mdvaden
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Re: Stick Method #1

Post by mdvaden » Sat Jul 18, 2015 10:12 pm

The video reminds me why I realized the Oregon tree team that measured the spruce I nominated a few years ago, were too crude guessing crown spread.

At least your stick is straight and there is a plumb bob.

For the crown spread, they just wander underneath trying to eyeball what they thought was straight overhead, etc..

I don't mind primitive tools, but your video sure makes it clear why if a laser or something more accurate is available, why not use it.

Personally, I'd probably prefer the shadow method over the stick method if an area is wide open.
M. D. Vaden of Oregon = http://www.mdvaden.com

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Don
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Re: Stick Method #1

Post by Don » Sun Jul 19, 2015 12:29 am

Mario-
I have similar feeling about the "crane the neck" school of measuring crown spread...one of the solutions from a Northern California enterprise (Ken Stumpf of Geographic Resource Solutions, Inc) is the GRS densitometer (http://www.grsgis.com/users-guide.html).
This device, and anything similar to it, does an excellent job of determining crown edge, with it's horizontal and vertical level pairing. No batteries necessary...: ~ }
By the way, nice article lately in the special American Forest issue!
-Don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
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dbhguru
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Re: Stick Method #1

Post by dbhguru » Sun Jul 19, 2015 6:56 am

NTS,

As we've often explained by one method or another, the reason that the stick and tangent methods for measuring tree height are so error prone is because the assumptions made, explicitly or implicitly, about the shape of the object being measured are not fulfilled. Matt's video opens the door to a new approach for reaching more people, and I think Matt's video has the smell of success.

Looking at the high end of the measuring game, regardless of the training and marketing approaches we use, I'm not expecting any flood of anxious new recruits. However, there is still plenty of room in the American Forests National Cadre for people who want to join us. Unless you are already certifiably an expert, an apprenticeship period is required. That can be handled via the Internet for some, but it is probably not the way to go for others. We will keep exploring new approaches to the training, but there is no substitute for understanding the processes and be able to apply the formulas.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Stick Method #1

Post by Matt Markworth » Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:30 pm

dbhguru wrote:Matt,

A really fine video. Very easy to follow. We congratulate you. A series of such videos could be made available through the American Forests website if you are game. The more we can load up the AF website with learning materials like your video, the quicker we'll make converts from places we haven't been reaching, since many visitors to AF automatically give that source full credence. Since you are Cadre, your voice will be given extra respect. It is a case of directing our efforts toward the media source with the highest standing.

Bob
Bob,

Thanks. Yes, I could definitely do some videos if there is interest in having a "learning library" on the AF website. This one was very impromptu, but we could refine the message and up the production value for a video series. Anyone else with more advanced video skills could join in or if other cadre members wanted to be on screen that would be good too. Lots of topics to cover!

Matt

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