Red maple cambial fusion and bark inclusion

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Will Blozan
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Red maple cambial fusion and bark inclusion

Post by Will Blozan » Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:05 pm

NTS,

I do wish I had a photo of this tree while it was standing... I did not realize it would be such a good example of how two (or more) stems can fuse into one single concentric growth ring over time. This tree was well on it's way to a three-way fusion but alas, I removed it last week due to- you guessed it- structural issues. I will have more photos soon of another section of this tree- where two stems fused over a 2.5 foot distance. Ugh- left my saw at the shop...

Anyway, in the photos below there is a raw cut with no arrows so you can see what it looks like. The cut was made conveniently at 4.5 feet up and the trunk at that point (take my word for it) looked more or less like a single trunk. Individual piths went well below 4.5 feet. Externally, some bark inclusion could be spotted where the cambium was not yet breached (black arrow below).
Raw cut
Raw cut
Raw cut.jpg (240.71 KiB) Viewed 1906 times
Detail arrows
Detail arrows
Detail.jpg (248.47 KiB) Viewed 1906 times
Photo key:
Red-Piths of individual stems
Blue- included bark from trunks pressing on each other as they expand annually in diameter
Green- breached and fused cambium between separate stems; i.e. single cambium layer surrounding two former trunks
Black- soon to be breached cambium of three stems

I hope this will help folks visualize what happens as separate trunks expand and coalesce into a fusion.

Will

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Don
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Re: Red maple cambial fusion and bark inclusion

Post by Don » Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:56 pm

Will-
Youddaman! Simple me and Bob, dealing with doubles and you come up with a triple!

Bob and I were discussing back in double-land how we thought that there's still probably the same amount of volume (or mass, as there's bound to be reaction wood [compression wood in hardwoods]) at the fusion interface, but it gets displaced out (like Mario's double ponderosa).

Looking at your triple, I'm guessing we could consider it a coppice? If not, three trees at least one of which is a different age (guessing, can't count the rings).

The shapes had me thinking how a bee's honeycomb chamber shape is determined by pressure of those chambers around it...
-Don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

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View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
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Will Blozan
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Re: Red maple cambial fusion and bark inclusion

Post by Will Blozan » Fri Aug 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Don,

This tree was planted ~28 years ago. Indeed, it was a multi-stemmed tree at that point and should have been pruned.

Will

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dbhguru
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Re: Red maple cambial fusion and bark inclusion

Post by dbhguru » Fri Aug 23, 2013 9:00 pm

Will,


As Don says, you da man! This is where we really start to turn the Titanic around. We need lots of images of trees coalescing so that people can understand the spectrum of structures and we can sort out what is comparable to what.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Don
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Re: Red maple cambial fusion and bark inclusion

Post by Don » Fri Aug 23, 2013 10:23 pm

Will, as you noted in your initial post, 'before' shots encompass the full girth are real helpful too!
Thanks, as Bob says, this is solid gold stuff! Keep 'em coming...we (MGWG) meet this coming Friday.
-Don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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bbeduhn
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Re: Red maple cambial fusion and bark inclusion

Post by bbeduhn » Mon Aug 26, 2013 8:15 am

This is a little different scenario with a white pine. These two trees grow next to each other so it is an assumption that they have the same growth patterns. These are at Kellogg, owned by UNCA (Univ. of NC, Asheville).
multitrunk white pine stump
multitrunk white pine stump
potentially, a multirtunk white pine
potentially, a multirtunk white pine

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dbhguru
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Re: Red maple cambial fusion and bark inclusion

Post by dbhguru » Mon Aug 26, 2013 8:25 am

Brian,

This is an excellent example of a confusing trunk form for white pines. The things are at work: (1) possibility of separate trees fusing together, (2) open grown form, and (3) weevil damage to further complicate the open grown form. I see this all the time.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

lalacurf121
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Re: Red maple cambial fusion and bark inclusion

Post by lalacurf121 » Fri Jan 08, 2016 11:28 pm

it was a multi-stemmed tree at that point and should have been pruned.
บาคาร่า

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Will Blozan
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Re: Red maple cambial fusion and bark inclusion

Post by Will Blozan » Sat Jan 09, 2016 7:59 am

Indeed- lack of simple structural pruning of landscape trees is one of the single most reasons for premature failure or removal. I see it way too often.

Will

lalacurf121
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Re: Red maple cambial fusion and bark inclusion

Post by lalacurf121 » Wed Jan 20, 2016 1:10 am

These two trees grow next to each other so it is an assumption that they have the same growth patterns.
royal1688

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