Routledge Handbook of Forest Ecology

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Lee Frelich
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Routledge Handbook of Forest Ecology

Post by Lee Frelich » Thu Dec 10, 2015 3:35 pm

Ents,

The new Routledge Handbook of Forest Ecology just came out in print in the last week. This comprehensive summary of the state of knowledge was organized by Kelvin Peh, Yves Bergeron and Richard Corlett, and involves 44 chapters written by 86 scientists. Part I, The Forest, has 6 chapters on boreal, northern temperate, subtropical, tropical and managed forests. Part II, Forest dynamics, has 6 chapters on insect dynamics, fire, wind, succession and gap dynamics, genetics and gene flow, and changing forest dynamics. Part III, flora and fauna, has 9 chapters on lianas, vascular epiphytes, insects, pathogens and pests, bryophytes, lichens, mammals, birds, and patterns of biodiversity. part IV, energy and nutrients, has 4 chapters on mycorrhizae, nutrient cycles, water cycles and primary production. Part v, conservation and management has 7 chapters on natural regeneration, tropical deforestation, restoration, fragmentation, logging, pollution, and biological invasions. part VI, forest and climate change, has 6 chapters on fire and climate, droughts in boreal forests, tree growth and climate, plant movements in response to climate change, forest carbon budgets, and modelling climate impacts. Part VII, human ecology, has 6 chapters on non timber forest products, agriculture in the forest, indigenous forest knowledge, recreation, hunting, and urban forests.

I just received my complimentary copy as the co-author of chapters 3 (northern temperate forests, with Rebecca Montgomery and Jacek Olyksyn) and 10 (forest succession and gap dynamics, with Rebecca Montgomery). The book looks great, and is probably the best summary of all things forest that could be put into 652 pages. I wonder how much fun it was for the 3 editors to deal with 86 scientists?

Lee

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dbhguru
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Re: Routledge Handbook of Forest Ecology

Post by dbhguru » Thu Dec 10, 2015 3:53 pm

Lee,

Thank for giving us a heads up. Sounds like a must for my library. We need a comprehensive guide that covers all forest ecology topics - a guide that is real science. Given your blistering schedule, when do you sleep?

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

Joe

Re: Routledge Handbook of Forest Ecology

Post by Joe » Fri Dec 11, 2015 5:23 pm

Lee Frelich wrote:.... and managed forests
Lee, I'll be interested to see what it says about managed forests- since, hardly anything I've read in any book remotely describes the way I've seen forest management since the early '70s- the good, the bad, and the ugly. It should be neither classic forestry propaganda nor the all too common critique of all forestry as rapacious. There seems to be no middle ground in forestry- much the way the American middle class is rapidly vanishing- the way there is now no middle ground in politics. The truth about forestry is to be found right in the middle....
Joe

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dbhguru
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Re: Routledge Handbook of Forest Ecology

Post by dbhguru » Fri Dec 11, 2015 6:53 pm

Joe,

Although forest management topics play a limited role in the BBS due to our non-economic focus, it would be instructive for our members to hear your thoughts about what you've seen since the 1970s. Was there a golden era of forestry from your perspective? I'd also love to here Gaines's take on the topic. I greatly respect what the two of you strive to achieve, and I think that all of us, regardless of our backgrounds should have an idea of what good forestry can achieve and how it differs from what we often witness. I guess I'm making a pitch for you to define that middle ground for our non-forestry members. Most likely will not read books on eco-forestry or the history of forestry. A few words from those of you who practice forestry every day would be welcome.

Over the course of the last 25 to 30 years, I've observed plenty of forest management operations. Your tutelage since the middle 1990s has been invaluable. As a result, I have an image of what I would like to see in a forested landscape that is largely managed, which I'm willing to share, but you first.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Lee Frelich
Posts: 155
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 3:24 pm

Re: Routledge Handbook of Forest Ecology

Post by Lee Frelich » Sat Dec 12, 2015 10:50 am

Joe,

I think the managed forest chapter is middle of the road, as is the chapter on ecological impacts of logging. Advantages and disadvantages of various practices are pointed out.

Bob, the more I sleep, the more efficiently I get things done during the day. Getting a lot done is more about how efficiently time is used than about much time is taken to do things.

Lee

Joe

Re: Routledge Handbook of Forest Ecology

Post by Joe » Sun Dec 20, 2015 8:27 am

dbhguru wrote:Joe,

Although forest management topics play a limited role in the BBS due to our non-economic focus, it would be instructive for our members to hear your thoughts about what you've seen since the 1970s. Was there a golden era of forestry from your perspective? I'd also love to here Gaines's take on the topic. I greatly respect what the two of you strive to achieve, and I think that all of us, regardless of our backgrounds should have an idea of what good forestry can achieve and how it differs from what we often witness. I guess I'm making a pitch for you to define that middle ground for our non-forestry members. Most likely will not read books on eco-forestry or the history of forestry. A few words from those of you who practice forestry every day would be welcome.

Over the course of the last 25 to 30 years, I've observed plenty of forest management operations. Your tutelage since the middle 1990s has been invaluable. As a result, I have an image of what I would like to see in a forested landscape that is largely managed, which I'm willing to share, but you first.

Bob
Bob, the golden era of forestry is yet to happen. It can't happen until all ecosystem services are properly accounted for- along with the externalities. How can any enterprise- either private or public sector function without proper accounting? I was an accounting major for a year and did well at it- I liked the rigor of the accounting profession. Without full and proper accounting, forestry is adrift- subject to beatings by those who hate all tree cutting and all too often obscured by industry propaganda, while armies of bureaucrats waste tax dollars with phony oversight, sometimes ignoring the bad work while exaggerating their claims they're protecting wetlands or rare species- which in fact, are not really endangered by even mediocre work. In a nutshell, forestry is a mess and will remain that way until we have a better educated and trained forestry profession, using advanced accounting methods, which can intelligently defeat the anti forestry crowd, without idiotic propaganda- so successufully that the army of government oveseers (local, state and federal, along with international certifiers) go away and leave us to do our work with the full public trust, that as professionals, we can indeed manage this extremely important resource- without claiming that all forests must be managed- that much should be in reserves, wilderness areas and parks.

Joe

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