Page 3 of 3

Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Posted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 2:21 pm
by dbhguru
NTS,

Events on Oct 15th

Oct 15th proved to be a gala New England autumn day, cool, bright sun, and fall colors. The day’s schedule consisted of a field trip from 10:00AM until 3:30PM in accessible parts of MTSF followed by several events at the Charlemont Inn extending until 9:00PM.

We had our customary breakfast at the Inn then headed to Zoar Gap where we hiked down stream to the Elders Grove. There we shared the great pines with the group. An added benefit of having Will and Don Bragg attending was our collective re-measuring of Saheda. Three sets of equipment, three different measuring locations, and three sets of eyes. Beforehand, I predicted the height of Saheda from the established mid-point would be 166 feet. From my base point, I had gotten 167.1 previously and I knew my base point was higher than Will’s by about half a foot. I tend to follow the vertical wood to the lowest point it touches the earth. Well, here are the results:

Measurer Height

Bob Leverett 166.2
Will Blozan 166.3
Don Bragg 166.5

I settled on Will’s measurement of 166.3 as Saheda’s height. The actual average of the 3 measurements is 166.333 feet. I plan to abandon my mid-slope positions and stick with Will’s for all future measurements. It is less confusing that way. However, note that my prior measurement of 167.1 – 0.5 feet adjusted offset yields 166.6 feet. So the maximum spread for the 4 independent measurements is 0.4 feet. Not bad.

After leaving the Elders Grove, we went up on the boulder field of Clark Ridge. I have reported on the forests of Clark ridge often. It is a rather inhospitable environment for people, but the small group was up for it. It was the only way for the small group of new comers to see a little old growth. The following images show the predominately sugar maple-ash forest that has been so productive in the past, but is now showing signs of wear. The forest may have peaked. In the following images Carl Harting is shown next to an aging white ash tree, followed by an area of exquisite old-growth sugar maples with moss-covered rocks. Next comes our buddy Don Bragg followed by a look at Negus Mountain across the Deerfield River. Finally, we see Magic Maple in her autumn finery.
ClarkRidge-1.jpg
ClarkRidge-2.jpg
ClarkRidge-3.jpg
ClarkRidge-4.jpg
From the boulder field, we moved down to near the trailhead and then back upslope to the bigtooth aspen grove that grows opposite Zoar Gap. The grove is home to the champion tall aspen of New England and maybe the northeast. We previously had its height at 126.0 feet. Well, we still do. The champ is skinny, but the stand is aging rapidly. I doubt the trees will hold on for many more years. In terms of heirs apparent, I think one other tree in the stand is 122 feet. Most of the other tall ones are about 115. However, a much more attractive aspen in Monroe SF is 125 feet.

From the aspens we made our way by a very tall ash. We settled on 142.6 feet in height. Then it was Magic Maple’s turn. She always comes through. Here is an image of this charismatic red maple in her autumn finery. Magic is Tim Zelazo’s favorite.
ClarkRidge-5.jpg
Bidding farewell to the magic one, we moved on for a rendezvous with the Bruce Kershner Memorial Pine. Bruce's tree is one of Mohawk's 150s and is a beautifully formed pine. The small, bubbling streams on both sides of Bruce's tree imparted a feeling of life and vitality to the forest. In the vicinity many beautiful, healthy hemlocks greeted us. After passing Bruce’s spot, we worked our way down slope to the Three Graces, white pines that point the way to a small grove down hill that honors standout DCR employees. After passing the dedicated pines, we made our way to the road and walked back to our starting point. Crossing the bridge over the Deerfield, we could see the big pines of the Elders Grove tipping their lofty crowns in appreciation of our visit. It was time for us to return to the Inn for Bart Bouricius’s presentation on rainforest tree forms and to partake of refreshments.

Bart’s presentation was extremely interesting and held all our attentions. Bart climbs in the canopies of the rainforests of Asia, Central America, and South America. The diversity of the tree forms he showed us was simultaneously fascinating and bewildering. I could not image myself learning to identify all those species, let alone understanding what niches they fill. The tropics add a level of complexity that is not easily disentangled in my aging brain. It is a fact of life. Aging happens.

After an excellent dinner, it was all Monica’s show. She always comes through for us and did again with a stellar program of music, prose, and poetry. the program reminded me of the role of the arts can in gaining our appreciation of forests and trees. Monica recruited Dr. David Snyder of UMASS and Amherst to play clarinet. The poetry and prose readings were excellent. Joan Maloof led off. Robin Barber and Carol Edelstein followed. Then came Norma Roche with a conclusion by ENTS poet laureate Susan Middleton.

I know of nobody who wasn’t impressed by the quality of the performances. I was a little disappointed that more people didn’t make it to evening event, but the Charlemont Inn seems far away to people who might otherwise attend. Next year we may opt to have the evening with music, poetry, and prose in Northampton. It would be a pity since the Inn is so very, very special. Nonetheless, on that lovely fall evening, there was no finer music and poetry to hear. I think everyone in attendance would agree. I'll close with three images from the historic Inn. The first two show a couple of Tarot images that hang on the wall. The images go all the way around the wall. The last image speaks for itself.
Inn-1.jpg
Inn-2.jpg
Inn-3.jpg
Bob

Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Posted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 3:50 pm
by AndrewJoslin
Indeed! I was experiencing serious "I am not worthy" during the music and readings at the Charlemont Inn. From the musical selections and performances, to the readings and back I was either in rapt attention, laughing, or fighting tears at other moments. Really special.

Here are a few photos from the walk in the woods led by Bob. I have to say Bob outdid himself taking us through classically intense Mohawk Trail State Forest terrain enhanced by wet rocks and leaves. Everyone did very well getting around, it was well worth it, this is the true stuff of the forest experience and tall tree exploring. To spare you the horror I'm not posting photos of the vigorous patch of Netted Stinkhorn (Dictyophora duplicata) found by Bart growing in and around a broken stump. Roger Phillips (Mushrooms of North America) describes the smell as "a very fetid odor". My unfortunate nose concurs.

Another angle on three sugar maples also well photographed by Bob

Click on image to see its original size

At the Saheda Pine, Tom Howard, Joan Maloof, Doug Bidlack and others

Click on image to see its original size

Lee Frelich talking about heliotropism in hardwood branch ends vs. a different strategy in conifers

Click on image to see its original size

Bob talks about mixed stands and biomes in MTSF, then asks "Everyone ready to hike through a steep boulder field?". The unanimous reply "Yes!"

Click on image to see its original size

Mohawk mosses

Click on image to see its original size

Honey mushrooms

Click on image to see its original size

Old Yellow-bellied Sapsucker drillings in a dead American Basswood

Click on image to see its original size

-AJ

Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Posted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 4:04 pm
by edfrank
We Want Netted Stinkhorn!! We Want Netted Stinkhorn!!

Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Posted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 4:47 pm
by dbhguru
Events of Oct 16th

The final day of the conference-rendezvous centered around an event held in the Bryant woods. We met at the head of the Rivulet Trail at the Bryant Homestead at 10:30AM on the 16th. Julie Richburg, chief ecologist for TTOR, and her young daughter joined us as did Ents Tom and Jack Howard. Tom came over from Syracuse. Jack came all the way from Toronto. The new comers to the Bryant woods were mightily impressed with the site.

The event was the establishment of a grove of pines dedicated to women environmentalists. The first pines dedicated were to Dr. Joan Maloof and the late Dr. Mary Byrd Davis. The selection of a pine posthumously for Mary should not be a surprise. She is legendary. Joan was selected for the other pine for many reasons, which will be discussed in the weeks to come. However, one reason is that Joan is launching a project to establish network of old-growth forests, one per county in each county in the U.S. Now that, folks, is an ambitious project. Many counties have no old growth. So in those localities, a forest intended to eventually become old growth would be selected. Joan conceived of the visionary project to call attention to dwindling natural forests in many parts of the nation. She spoke eloquently to her reasons at the conference. For the record, I am solidly behind Joan. I expect that she will keep us informed on her progress. Hopefully, we in the NTS can help her identify candidate forests.

We walked the regular route along the Rivulet trail. Joan, Tom, and Jack were extremely impressed by the large black cherry that I have frequently photographed. Continuing on, we reached the lowest point the trail reaches where there is a plaque. Joan read Bryant’s poem the Rivulet to us from the plaque. I made a recording of her reading. We continued on past yellow birches and that lovely red maple, Magic Maple’s younger sister. Then came the pines. I definitely saw Tom’s eyes get large. I don’t think he imagined so many huge trees. Joan’s tree is the first large one on the trail. Mary’s is next to Joan’s. We conducted the ceremony and moved on.

Along Pine Loop, we had time for a little tree measuring courtesy of Will’s ability to cover ground like a race horse. Will re-measured the Emily Dickinson tree. He got 153.9 feet. I had it at 153.4 from the year before, but failed to quite get 153 in a measurement a few weeks ago. Will diagnosed the problem. The tree has a tricky nested top. It was revealed by gusts of wind. It is a common problem for the Bryant pines that have lots of crown breaks.

Will also found and confirmed a striped maple in Bryant at 68.0 feet. It becomes the second tallest striped maple in the state. One in Mohawk hit 68.5. Beyond the measurements, Will had the opportunity to assess pine growth from his last visit. He’s conclusion is that the pines are packing on the wood. So far, have confirmed 16 pines with a girth over 11 feet. Fourteen reach 150 feet. That is the 5th highest number for a site in the Northeast. The numbers go like this: Mohawk 117, Cook 112, Claremont 65, Hearts Content 19, and Bryant 14.

I’ll close with a look at Joan’s tree with Joan and Julie’s daughter.
JoanMaloof-2.jpg
Bob

Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Posted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 5:39 pm
by AndrewJoslin
edfrank wrote:We Want Netted Stinkhorn!! We Want Netted Stinkhorn!!
Ed that's an unfair use of large text size! (so I reduced it to manageable size) I will meet your demand in a separate post so as not to stink up this otherwise lovely thread any further!
-AJ

Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Posted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:43 pm
by tomhoward
The past weekend was a glorious event. Bob, I deeply appreciate your showing my brother and me the wondrous White Pines of MTSF and Bryant. It was a magical time under those wonderful trees! The Bryant Pines are the finest White Pines we have ever seen! It was great meeting all of you! Hopefully we can make the Conference next year as well.

Tom Howard

Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Posted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 1:28 pm
by tomhoward
ENTS,

Here is my write-up of this great event:

From Fri. 10/14 – Sun/ 10/16/2011 my brother Jack Howard and I traveled to Massachusetts for the ENTS gathering. We stayed at the Holyoke Convention and Visitor Center.

In late afternoon and evening of Fri. Oct. 14, we went to Northampton, our first visit to this really nice progressive little city. I’ve been reading about Sylvia Plath lately and we visited some of the sites associated with her in Northampton, where she was a student at Smith College from 1950-1955, and taught English at Smith College from 1957-58. We went to Child’s Park, by 337 Elm St. (on Rt. 9) where Plath and her husband the poet Ted Hughes lived when Sylvia taught at Smith. Next to that house, in an adjoining lawn, is a White Pine that seems to be over 110 ft. tall and about 3 ft. dbh. There’s no doubt Plath and Hughes knew that tree.

Child’s Park had a lot of water as a very heavy rain had just ended. It is a beautiful park with many large trees, including some impressive Pin Oaks, one of which I measured to 45.1” dbh. But the most impressive trees are the towering fragrant White Pines (that Plath refers to her in her poem “Child’s Park Stones”), that I measured at 27.7” dbh, 36.5” dbh, 33.7” dbh, 39” dbh – and there are many more. Bob Leverett told me that these trees are about 120 ft. tall – I can well believe it. On this cloudy mysterious evening, I could sense Sylvia Plath’s spirit still here, under the dark pines and amid the oddly shaped megalithic looking stones that she wrote about in her poem. We also saw Sawara Cypress, Hemlock, Yellow Birch, Catalpa, White Oak (with deep russet leaves), big Red Oaks (seeming to be about 80-90 ft. tall in forest), large Witch Hazel shrubs, another White Oak 28.7” dbh, Black Gum, Gingko, European Larch, Red Maple, Scots Pine, Red Pine.

We also explored the lovely campus of Smith College which has many big trees, including many big Dawn Redwoods, and other trees including a big Sycamore near Paradise Pond. But the most impressive tree in Northampton is the giant Pin Oak on Columbus Ave., and we got a good look at – it’s awesome! – 17.7 ft. cbh, 113 ft. tall, 107 ft. branch spread, easily the biggest oak I’ve ever seen, and I’ve seen a lot of big oaks. In the center of Northampton we saw a huge Silver Maple (possibly close to 5 ft. dbh) on the grounds of the county courthouse – I think that’s what the old building is. Northampton is a fantastic place.

Sat. Oct. 15 – The day began sunny, cool, and beautiful, perfect fall weather. Clouds would build up when we were in Mohawk Trail SF, followed by rain in late afternoon. In the morning Jack and I left Holyoke, took I-91 north by Mt. Tom State Reservation, over the Oxbow (the setting of a famous painting by Thomas Cole as well as Plath’s poem “Above the Oxbow”) but you can’t see much from the highway; we saw some Sassafras with bright red leaves as we went north. We took MA 2 west to Charlemont and Mohawk Trail SF. We had no trouble finding the picnic area where we were supposed to park, thanks to Bob’s clear directions. We crossed the bridge over the Deerfield River, and walked up the wet trail to where we met the Ents, with Bob Leverett, Will Blozan, Andrew Joslin, Lee Frelich, Jack Sobon, Joan Maloof, Doug Bidlack, Carl Harting (at least that’s who I think we met), Bart Bouricious, and others. We followed them up the trail into the Elders Grove, the most impressive grove of White Pines I’d seen up to that time. According to Bob, the White Pines are about 185 years old, only middle-aged, and possibly growing faster now than at any time in their lives. They are the tallest trees I have ever seen in eastern North America, and Saheda Pine is the tallest, most awesome of the Elders. Other Elders Pines are named for Sacajawea, Ouray, Crazy Horse, Tecumseh (that Will Blozan measured to 165 ft. from tape drop 10/12 as I’d find out later). Just upslope from Saheda is a Red Maple that Bob said is at least 125 ft. tall – it looks short compared to Saheda; yet it is the tallest Red Maple I’ve ever seen, about 6 ft. taller than the NY record (which I think is a 119.1 ft. Red Maple in Zoar Valley). The Saheda Pine on this day was measured to 166.3 ft. with dbh of 44.9 in. Saheda is about 8 ft. taller than the tallest tree in NY, which I believe is a 158 ft. White Pine in the Elders Grove in the Adirondacks.

Trees seen in Elders Grove – White Pine (glorious!), Red Maple, Sugar Maple, Striped Maple, Basswood, Witch Hazel, White Ash, Beech, Red Oak, Yellow Birch, Hemlock.

Elders Grove is one of the most sacred places I’ve ever been.

Lee Frelich showed us his favorite plant, a ground plant called the Selkirk Violet, which is rare in most places.

A Sugar Maple near Elders Grove was measured to 121.8 ft. and 35 in. dbh.

The walk through a wet boulder field turned out to be too difficult for me so Jack and I broke off from the group and we made our way back down to the trail by the Deerfield River. We took a little snack break by the river and then headed back up the trail to Elders Grove where we spent a magical hour among the great White Pines. I measured a White Pine near the trail at 36.5” dbh, and the 125+ ft. Red Maple upslope from Saheda at 26.1” dbh.

Then we walked back to our car in increasing rain. About 20 minutes later the rest of the group arrived at the picnic area, and we drove to the historic Charlemont Inn (which dates from 1775 with famous guests like General Burgoyne (as POW in 1777), Benedict Arnold, Emerson, Thoreau, Mark Twain). We had a great time there, watching Bart Bouricious’s fascinating presentation on tropical forest trees in Peru, then a fabulous dinner, fascinating conversation, and, best of all, the Evening of Music, Poetry, and Prose, the best musical event I have ever attended! Among people met at the Charlemont Inn were the wonderful singer and hostess Charlotte Dewey, Joan Maloof, and the painter Robert Cumming. Monica’s playing of Debussy’s “Clair de lune” was especially magical, and Jack and I returned to Holyoke with the Moon accompanying us.

Sun. Oct. 16 – another beautiful sunny morning – this time Jack and I went to the Bryant Homestead near Cummington. We took I-91 north to Northampton, went once again through the lovely tree-filled city of Northampton, going west on MA 9 to Cummington. We went by Look Park, saw the tall White Pines in the background (well, some other time), then through Florence, and on to Cummington. At the Bryant Homestead at the head of the Rivulet Trail, we met Bob and Monica Leverett, Will Blozan, Joan Maloof, Julie Richberg of the Trustees of Reservations and Julie Richberg’s 5-year-old daughter Isabelle. A glorious outing, the best fall outing I’ve ever been on, followed. It was a perfect fall day, cool with lots of sun, and some clouds. We took the Rivulet Trail into an old growth forest, the first original old growth forest I’ve ever been to in New England (and I’ve been traveling through New England since childhood), the forest that inspired William Cullen Bryant, one of America’s first major poets, as a child. The trees he played under as a child are still there, as Bob Leverett has proved by coring – Hemlocks over 250 years old. And in this forest where Bryant found enchantment, Isabelle, the child of the 21st century, found enchantment too. And so did we adults.

One of the most impressive trees in this old forest is a Black Cherry estimated to be about 180 years old, 9.05 ft. cbh, which Bob said is 101.5 ft. tall – it is a beautiful tree. There is also old Yellow Birch, White Ash, Red Maple, Beech in this mostly Hemlock stand. Everywhere in Bryant Woods, including in the incredible White Pine grove we would enter, the ground is covered with Partridgeberry – I’ve never seen so much of it.

While we walked we could hear the Rivulet rushing through the ravine below – it still flows as it did when Bryant was a child over 200 years ago. A moment of utter magic occurred when Joan Maloof read Bryant’s poem “The Rivulet” in her melodious voice from a sign posted on the trail. The Rivulet of the poem provided background music, in its eternal youth.

Then we entered the White Pine grove. These magnificent Pines are not old growth, and are about 150 years old or so, but this does not take away from their grandeur. The Pine Grove at Bryant Woods is easily the grandest Eastern forest I have ever seen! The Pine Loop Trail, which Bob Leverett laid out, is the best trail like this I’ve ever been on, and this trail winds from one great Pine to another. These giant White Pines are often only 10-15 ft. apart, and well over 140 ft. tall. The ground under the great Pines was covered by freshly fallen pine needles, and the air was fragrant with the fresh spicy smell of White Pines in autumn.

The first tree we came to was a White Pine 11.5 ft. cbh and 150.3 ft. tall. At this tree a dedicatory grove for Women Environmentalists was inaugurated, and this tree was dedicated to Joan Maloof. It was a special moment, deeply touching with Joan present at the dedication of her tree. A White Pine the same size (11.5 ft. cbh, 150+ ft. tall) was dedicated to Mary Byrd Davis. The Maloof and Davis Pines are 21.5 ft. apart. Some of these magnificent White Pines have been dedicated to poets – Robert Frost’s Pine is 154 ft. tall. The tallest tree in the grove (and at the Bryant Homestead) is the William Cullen Bryant White Pine, which is 157 ft. tall. The largest tree in the grove is a White Pine 13.4 ft. cbh. The Centurion White Pine is 12 ft. cbh and 150 ft. tall. All these Pines have huge trunks that soar straight up into the sparkling autumn sky. Words can’t describe how glorious this grove is. I well believe, as Bob Leverett says, that these are the best White Pines in New England. This grove has 14 White Pines 150 or more feet tall. Will Blozan re-measured the great Emily Dickinson White Pine (11.1 ft. cbh) to 153.9 ft. tall. An inspiring sight was the broken top of a White Pine well over 140 ft. tall, with vastly spreading branches regenerating the top and looking like a giant eagle high in the sky. We never wanted to leave this wondrous grove!

Other trees (far shorter) among the White Pines are Hemlock, Red Maple, Beech, Yellow Birch, and other trees, there and in the older forest like Striped Maple, Hop Hornbeam. Julie Richberg showed us 3 species of Clubmoss – Northern Ground Pine (or Princess Pine), Ground Cedar, Staghorn Clubmoss (spiky and upright).

We reluctantly left the Pines and walked back along the Rivulet Trail to our cars, where we talked some more about trees, and said good-by. It was wonderful spending time with everyone, and we bought Joan’s books. Jack and I continued west on MA 9 (though a higher area with lots of Balsam Fir, Red Spruce) toward Pittsfield, MA.

In Pittsfield, we turned north on US Rt. 7, stopped for donuts at Lanesborough just north, at a place by scenic Pontoosuc Lake – glorious view of forested mountains across the lake with passing sunlight illuminating fall colors on steep slopes; next door a group of 5 tall White pines, all in all a classic New England scene. Light rain began to fall and rain would be with us all the way back to North Syracuse. We drove by Mt. Greylock to the Clark Institute just south of Williamstown, looked at the magnificent art there, especially some Renoirs. Then we headed back into NY on MA 2.


Tom Howard

Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Posted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 3:04 pm
by edfrank
NTS,

Here are some images of the Forest Summit Presentations, courtesy of Tim Zelazo and Gary Beluzo:
Robert Leverett - Friends of Mohawk Trail Sate Forests and the Eastern Native Tree Society "Native Tree Society - A Quick Overview" and "The Role of ENTS in the Conference Series" & "Travels to Far Away Places with an Eye on the Trees"
Robert Leverett - Friends of Mohawk Trail Sate Forests and the Eastern Native Tree Society "Native Tree Society - A Quick Overview" and "The Role of ENTS in the Conference Series" & "Travels to Far Away Places with an Eye on the Trees"
Dr. Fred Pailett - "The American Chestnut: Ecology, Devastation and Restoration of a Forest Icon" (file photo)
Dr. Fred Pailett - "The American Chestnut: Ecology, Devastation and Restoration of a Forest Icon" (file photo)
Fred_Paillet_Headshot_rdax_150x191.jpg (23.47 KiB) Viewed 4211 times
Micheal Wojtech, Writer, Naturalist, Photographer, and Illustrator - "How to Recognize Trees from Their Bark"
Micheal Wojtech, Writer, Naturalist, Photographer, and Illustrator - "How to Recognize Trees from Their Bark"
Dr. Henry Art - Robert F. Rosenburg Professor of Biology & Environmental Studies at Williams College "What We Know (and don't know) about an Enigmatic Woodlot - The Continuing Role of the Research Hopkins Forest" (file photo)
Dr. Henry Art - Robert F. Rosenburg Professor of Biology & Environmental Studies at Williams College "What We Know (and don't know) about an Enigmatic Woodlot - The Continuing Role of the Research Hopkins Forest" (file photo)
henry_art.gif (38.1 KiB) Viewed 4211 times
Will Blozan - President of the Eastern Native Tree Society and Appalachian Arborists "Liriodendron, King of the American Hardwoods"
Will Blozan - President of the Eastern Native Tree Society and Appalachian Arborists "Liriodendron, King of the American Hardwoods"
Peter Church - MA Department of Conservation and Recreation "DCR Responce and Role, Post Irene"
Peter Church - MA Department of Conservation and Recreation "DCR Responce and Role, Post Irene"
Prof. Gary A. Beluzo - Professor of Environmental Science at Holyoke Community College "Forests Designed by Nature Versus Managed Woodlands"
Prof. Gary A. Beluzo - Professor of Environmental Science at Holyoke Community College "Forests Designed by Nature Versus Managed Woodlands"
gary_beluzo.JPG (171.22 KiB) Viewed 4211 times
Dr. Steve Tilley - Professor Emeritus, Department of Biology, Smith College &quot;Salamanders in North American Deciduous Forests<br /> - Species, Habitats and Roles in the Ecosystem&quot;
Dr. Steve Tilley - Professor Emeritus, Department of Biology, Smith College "Salamanders in North American Deciduous Forests
- Species, Habitats and Roles in the Ecosystem"
Dr. Lee Frelich - University of Minnesota, Director of the Center for Hardwood Ecology &quot;Multiple factors and thresholds for forest change in a warming climate  - The Science &amp; The Myth&quot;
Dr. Lee Frelich - University of Minnesota, Director of the Center for Hardwood Ecology "Multiple factors and thresholds for forest change in a warming climate - The Science & The Myth"
lee_frelich5.JPG (163.29 KiB) Viewed 4211 times
Dr. Pat Swain - MA Rare and Endangered Species Program &quot;NHESP Priority and Exemplary Forested Natural Communities in Massachusetts - How Massachusetts Protects Rare and Endangered Species&quot;
Dr. Pat Swain - MA Rare and Endangered Species Program "NHESP Priority and Exemplary Forested Natural Communities in Massachusetts - How Massachusetts Protects Rare and Endangered Species"
pat_swain3.JPG (177.85 KiB) Viewed 4211 times
Dr. Don Bragg - US Forest Service &quot;The Role of the USDA Forest Service in Promoting Natural Communities&quot;
Dr. Don Bragg - US Forest Service "The Role of the USDA Forest Service in Promoting Natural Communities"
don_bragg4.JPG (149.65 KiB) Viewed 4211 times
Dr. Joan Maloof - Salisbury Colege, MD &quot;Lessons Learned in Old Growth Forests&quot;
Dr. Joan Maloof - Salisbury Colege, MD "Lessons Learned in Old Growth Forests"
Dr. Doug Seale - Framingham State College, MA &quot;Valuing the Environment in America: A Historical Perspective&quot;
Dr. Doug Seale - Framingham State College, MA "Valuing the Environment in America: A Historical Perspective"
doug_seale3.JPG (108.47 KiB) Viewed 4211 times
Sharyl Heller - Friends Network &quot;Are We Making Progress - The Role of the Friends Network&quot;
Sharyl Heller - Friends Network "Are We Making Progress - The Role of the Friends Network"
sharl_heller.JPG (96.89 KiB) Viewed 4211 times
Elizabeth Perry - Wampanoag Nation &quot;Pre-contact and Colonial period views, management techniques, and material culture of Native Americans in Massachusetts&quot; (file photo)
Elizabeth Perry - Wampanoag Nation "Pre-contact and Colonial period views, management techniques, and material culture of Native Americans in Massachusetts" (file photo)
elizabeth_perry1.jpg (15.01 KiB) Viewed 4211 times
elizabeth_perry_nd_bob.jpg
.

Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Posted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 6:07 pm
by AndrewJoslin
Great report Tom, very nicely written!
-AJ

Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Posted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 7:16 pm
by dbhguru
Tom,

Absolutely wonderful write-up. You did and amazing job of capturing all the numbers except one that you couldn't have known about. At Bryant, while we were on the trail , Will scooted off looking for whatever he could locate of interest and found and measured a striped maple to 68 feet. It is the second tallest we know of in New England. The tallest is in the ENTS grove in MTSF and is 68.5 feet.

I hope you and Jack will be able to return next year when we'll do it again.

Bob