Newbie from West Virginia wanting to measure trees here

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WestVirginny
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2018 12:39 pm

Newbie from West Virginia wanting to measure trees here

Post by WestVirginny » Thu Apr 12, 2018 12:48 pm

Hi, I am in central West Virginia. I am looking to measure some trees in the parks around here and other places. I have a regular steel tape measure, not a D tape, and no inclinometer, laser equipment or anything else to measure trees. Anywhere to rent or buy or borrow that you'd recommend?

Also, are there lists of growth factors for trees other than what I saw from International Arborist society (not on their site, I couldn't find it but factors were on others such as 5 for Oak)? It only has a few trees and at this point I'm trying to age trees based on diameters. I know this can be somewhat inaccurate.

Are there any meetings of WV Native Tree society folks or measurings going on if that is the term?

Thanks, West Virginnny

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dbhguru
Posts: 4567
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Newbie from West Virginia wanting to measure trees here

Post by dbhguru » Thu Apr 12, 2018 2:02 pm

Hi West Virginny,

Welcome aboard. The best course of action is to hook up with Turner Sharp who is in West Virginia and on this BBS. He can advise you.

In general, trying to age trees by diameter isn't just a little inaccurate, it can miss the mark by large amounts. Suppressed hemlocks can have 50 growth rings per inch, and super-suppressed ones can go over 100 for an inch. On the other hand, fast growing cottonwoods can have growth rings over a half inch wide. The idea of measuring radius in inches and multiplying by a factor is appealing, but introduces more misinformation than it returns good estimates.

There's a wealth of information on the BBS on how to measure trees. If you find it too involved, we can talk you through the routines. You can get acceptable results with a tape and clinometer for absolutely straight trees that come to a point at the top of their crowns like spruces. However, big broad-crowned trees need a laser, clinometer, and the Sine Method. Turner can explain all this.

If you just want to get into the ball park, you can use the stick method. It requires a yardstick and a regular tape at least 100 feet long. We can talk you through the process if you want to try the method out.

Again, welcome aboard.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

WestVirginny
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2018 12:39 pm

Re: Newbie from West Virginia wanting to measure trees here

Post by WestVirginny » Thu Apr 12, 2018 4:06 pm

Thanks, I saw Mr. Sharp on here and will attempt to contact him. West Virginny

WestVirginny
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2018 12:39 pm

Re: Newbie from West Virginia wanting to measure trees here

Post by WestVirginny » Thu Apr 12, 2018 4:06 pm

Thanks, I saw Mr. Sharp on here and will attempt to contact him. West Virginny

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tsharp
Posts: 429
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:04 pm

Re: Newbie from West Virginia wanting to measure trees here

Post by tsharp » Thu Apr 12, 2018 9:36 pm

Tom:
I got your email/Post and would enjoy meeting with you. I will contact you by phone to see when we can get together. I believe you are in the Rock Cave, Buckhannon area - is that correct?

WestVirginny
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2018 12:39 pm

Re: Newbie from West Virginia wanting to measure trees here

Post by WestVirginny » Fri Apr 13, 2018 6:51 am

Yes, I am in French Creek. Call me anytime. I look forward to measuring, and Holly River is my #1 measuring destination although I would be glad to measure anywhere you are heading. Thanks, Tom

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