Introduction

A forum for new members to introduce themselves to the other members of ENTS. New users and guests can ask questions about ENTS and the ENTS BBS here.

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#1)  Introduction

Postby BOinBoston » Thu Oct 13, 2016 9:42 am

Hello. My name is Bo. I found this site due to my interest in old trees in Concord, MA. When I mention this to my friend, Susan, she mentioned that she had gone on a hike many-many years ago with the Robert Leverett, thus I sought out his name and found this website.

I visited Carlisle Pines in Carlisle, MA and saw the old trees which were approximated to have been a mature tree at the time of the revolution.
I didn't see Carlisle Pines, however, documented on the map where I thought old trees were noted. I may have misunderstood the purpose of the map.
Anyway, the girth of biggest looking tree (hemlock) was one inch shy of 12 feet. I suspect there are wider white pines, but didn't find them on this visit.

Anyway, if anyone knows of old trees in this area. I'd appreciate knowing and hearing how people use or are inspired by website. Thanks!

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#2)  Re: Introduction

Postby Larry Tucei » Fri Oct 14, 2016 10:59 am

Hello Bo-  Welcome to the BBS site. The BBS has many tree enthusiasts from locations all over the US.  Bob is still active with the BBS site and he could help you best with White Pine location in Mass.  He and others are focusing mostly with the AF project for now.  We have many projects that different members are involved with.  I've been in charge of the Live Oak Project down in the southeastern US for many years.  Several of our members are currently working with American Forests to update and correct the National listing of trees in North America.  This is a huge but rewarding undertaking that has been in the works for years.  Again welcome aboard and good tree hunting.  Larry
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#3)  Re: Introduction

Postby a_blooming_botanist » Thu Oct 20, 2016 6:32 pm

Hello, Bo! Welcome to the Native Tree Society!

I am a fellow easterner (of Massachusetts) with an interest in old and big trees. I had a chance to visit the Carlisle Pines last month. That hemlock that you measured is quite a tree, huh? It's a shame that the hemlock wooly adelgid has gotten the best of it. Just next to that old tree is the tallest of the Carlisle Pines at 124.8 feet tall (see picture below). There are other old pine trees in there, but none as tall (that I or others have measured). As far as wider pines in those woods, I did measure one with a circumference of 10.88 feet working towards 120 feet tall. My search was by no means exhaustive, so if you do find some other nice, big ones in there, please report on them!

               
                       
Carlisle State Forest - big hemlock and tall pine.jpg
                                       
               

I use this website to share my big tree finds and to read about what other folks are finding in other parts of the country and world. I've even met the humans behind some of the usernames you see on this site, as Bob Leverett kindly introduced me to the tall trees of Mohawk Trail State Forest and others in their fan club. The more time I spend out in western MA the more it becomes clear how rare old and tall trees and forests are in the eastern portion of the state. I've spent some time tree hunting in Concord, specifically at Punkatasset Hill. I found some white pines over 130' tall, though not as "girthy" as the Carlisle Pines. I've heard that Estabrook Woods has some good, old trees. It may not be old growth, but it is nicely-maturing second growth. If/when you do come across some trees that meet your criteria for being interesting, do share pictures and a story with us!

Happy tree hunting!

Jared
Harvard, MA

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#4)  Thanks Larry and Jared

Postby BOinBoston » Thu Oct 20, 2016 7:47 pm

Hi Larry and Jared:
Hey great to hear from you both. First of all I'm responding "Full Reply" vs. replying under your individual name. I don't know the difference.
Anyway, Jared I was about to post when I saw your message. I've hiked in several areas of Estabrook woods, including Punkatasset Hill area. Last week when I was hiking by Mink Pond, I saw a woman who told me about Carlise Pines. I saw the tree you posted and I believe I saw the pine you mentioned. I measured that one and it was about 10.88, as you mention. It was pretty dark when I left the woods, so didn't take a photo. Nice to see yours.
The woman who lives on the corner to the woods entrance was nice and quite chatty and told me about the trees in the woods. She said someone came to the woods and climbed the tree awhile back and said the very tall pine tree lost it's top crown, and was no longer the highest east of the CT river. ??<--I have no idea about the truth of that statement, but the trees are clearly impressively large. I was surprise that stand of trees are in fairly small clump of woods. In any case all these mentioned places are protected, and I guess that means those trees are too.

Anyway, I posted this oak tree I saw in southern NH--couple days ago. I was with a friend and had him stand by the tree to give perspective. I measured the girth five feet up from the ground: the girth was 17.4 feet. We ran into the a forest ranger who was measuring the easement of some private land. Unfortunately the tree was not on the easement. I don't know how to figure the height. I realize it's posted somewhere on the site here, but would like to go out with someone sometime and see how it's done-- triangulation.

Anyway, I'm not sure how to be helpful to the website. One thought I had was this tree is on private land (I think) and it is mammoth. How does one go about protecting it, or is it not possible if land is privately owned?

Jared--You live in a beautiful area. I was just up by Harvard visiting Fruitlands. How nice it is there. Good luck Larry on your project.
Bo
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girth 17.4 feet
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#5)  Re: Introduction

Postby Larry Tucei » Fri Oct 21, 2016 8:37 am

Beautiful tree. From your photo it looks like a White Oak. Measure the  Circumference at 4' 6" above ground a standard if possible. Look on our site and you will find all the info you need on the proper measurement of trees. We use Laser's, Clinometer's and Calculator's to get exact height measurements.  Only the property owner can protect the tree. Good tree hunting.  The link how to measure correctly.    viewtopic.php?f=284&t=2984    Larry

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#6)  Re: Introduction

Postby Erik Danielsen » Fri Oct 21, 2016 10:13 am

Larry, looking at the shot up into the crown I think it's definitely Northern Red Oak- being so big and old the bark on the main trunk looks shaggy enough to evoke white oak, but up on the limbs in particular the bark is clearly northern red and the leaves match as well (though a bit out of focus).

This is an incredible specimen, the list of oaks of this stature in the northeast is probably pretty short. The NH state list looks like it's got some chunky trees (with probably mismeasured heights) but an upright forest-grown oak of such girth is a truly impressive thing to behold. Hopefully you can get in touch with some of our NH folks- they're working on cleaning up errors in the state list and this tree may be worthy of contending the title.

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#7)  Re:follow up on NH Oak tree discussion

Postby BOinBoston » Fri Oct 21, 2016 11:24 am

Thanks Eric for weighing in. What's the contending title? Does what mean there is a list of highest/oldest oak trees in NH. Ya, I realised when I returned from the hike in I hadn't examined the tree leaf. I'm going up soon again and will hike back into the woods and check that out. Here are couple other close up photos, though maybe doesn't add much to IDing it. In any case it's pretty breathtaking-stands out alone--looking rather regal in the forest.
Bo
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17.4 ft in girth old oak tree
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#8)  Re: Introduction

Postby Erik Danielsen » Fri Oct 21, 2016 11:51 am

Yep, for all native trees, not highest/oldest specifically but trees are ranked on a system of points that account for girth, height and spread (age doesn't correlate well with any of those dimensions, because different environmental conditions can create very different growth rates). Here's the NH page: https://extension.unh.edu/Trees/NH-Big-Tree-Program
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#9)  Re: Introduction

Postby BOinBoston » Fri Oct 21, 2016 12:14 pm

Eric:
Thank you for info.
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