Hello, All

A forum for new members to introduce themselves to the other members of ENTS. New users and guests can ask questions about ENTS and the ENTS BBS here.

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#1)  Hello, All

Postby ElijahW » Sun Jun 26, 2011 6:04 pm

I've been following the native tree society website for a couple of years now and felt that I finally ought to introduce myself.  I became interested in old-growth forests after picking up a copy of Mr. Leverett's and Mr. Kershner's Sierra Club Guide to the Ancient Forests of the Northeast.  Starting with Green Lakes State Park outside of Syracuse, I've been making a point of visiting every site possible when I'm nearby.  I've been to most of the New York State forests mentioned in the book, plus Cook Forest, Hartwick Pines in Michigan, and the Smokies a couple of times.  Zoar Valley is my favorite, but the Adirondacks and Smokies are the most beautiful landscape-wise.  I'm not much into measuring, as some of you are, but many of the forests of the East don't require numbers to be called superlative.  

I'm very thankful to all on this site who have contributed to the great work that's being done, and especially thankful for Mr. Leverett's and Mr. Kershner's effort in putting out their book and turning me on to such an interesting hobby.  I own 6 acres of land in central New York, most of which has young trees on it.  Maples have taken over one end of an old pasture and walnuts the other end, and I've planted a small section in between with different oaks, white pine, tamarack, tulip poplar, balsam fir, hemlock, and even one American chestnut - all of my favorite northern trees, basically.  Hopefully one day my grandchildren can appreciate these trees in their semi-maturity.  

Elijah Whitcomb

P.S.  My favorite non-old growth forest is on Howland's Island in Savannah, NY, part of the Montezuma NWF and currently managed by the NYS DEC.  The whole island has been harvested at least once, but is home to some of the biggest young trees I've seen.  It also has great diversity for a northern site, and among the usual maple-beech-hickory are chinkapin oaks, large American elm, kentucky coffeetree, tupelo, hackberry, and sassafras.  If the DEC would let the trees grow for even fifty years or so, I'm certain a number of champion trees could be counted.  I've read that the state champion chinkapin oak is on the island somewhere, but it's either misidentified or elusive.  Anyways, thanks again and congrats on the new tulip tree height record.
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks
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#2)  Re: Hello, All

Postby edfrank » Sat Jul 09, 2011 8:40 pm

Elijah,

I am sorry that I missed your post.  I want to welcome you to the participating members of ENTS.  I see you are in central NY just north of the Finger Lakes.  There are some nice forests up your way.  There is some nice stuff in Letchworth State Park.  I hope to see you out there visiting sites ad sending us trip reports in the near future.

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky
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#3)  Re: Hello, All

Postby Neil » Sun Jul 10, 2011 7:30 am

hi Elijah,

welcome aboard. there are only a handful of CNY'ers in ENTS, it seems [i grew up in Volney, NY]. given the amount of forest in the Southern Tier, the recovery of forest in the Lake Ontario Plain with agricultural abandonment over the last 30-50 yrs and the relatively weak economy in the region, it seems like this area should be an expanding forest that will be a benefit to future generations. with the abundant lake-effect precipitation, cloudy skies and a Goldilocks climate [not-too-cold, not-too-hot], it ought to be a great place for big trees to grow.

neil
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#4)  Re: Hello, All

Postby jamesrobertsmith » Sun Jul 10, 2011 5:47 pm

Welcome. I'm like you. I enjoy looking at the forests for the simple pleasure of their existence. I'm willing to leave the science of definition up to others who are qualified to research that stuff.
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#5)  Re: Hello, All

Postby dbhguru » Sun Jul 10, 2011 6:51 pm

Hello Elijah,

  Welcome aboard. I'm glad you found the book that Bruce and I coauthored helpful. My wife Monica and I are getting ready to do a book on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Have you had an opportunity to explore it?

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
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Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
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#6)  Re: Hello, All

Postby ElijahW » Sun Jul 10, 2011 10:02 pm

Bob,

I actually lived in Lynchburg, VA, from 2001-2003 and 2009-2010.  I've spent many, many hours in the foothills of the Blue Ridge, mostly around the Lynchburg area.  I have hundreds of pictures of the area as well from the parkway.  I've hiked some around the Peaks of Otter, but never camped or spent more than a few hours at a time, regrettably.  Virginia's mountains are a special place to me, maybe because they remind me of Vermont, where I spent my childhood, maybe because of their ability to refresh the mind and soul, or maybe because they're just so beautiful.  I suspect that a thorough exploration of the Blue Ridge's many coves would yield lots of big trees, especially oaks, hickories, and tuliptrees.  In addition, many of the oaks, especially the whites and the chestnuts, along the ridges appear to be very old (and sometimes very uniquely shaped).  The Jefferson and Washington National Forests also seem very impressive, especially at lower elevations.  

I'm more familiar with the foothills around Lynchburg than the mountains themselves, especially the property owned by Liberty University, where I went to school.  "Liberty Mountain," which I would call a series of big foothills, contains a fairly diverse forest.  Oaks include blackjack, northern and southern red, chestnut (dominant), white, post, black, and scarlet.  Pines include shortleaf, white, pitch, and virginia.  The deeper coves contain large (but not especially tall) tulip trees, beech, pignut hickory, and red maple, with an occasional sycamore and other assorted hardwoods.  Many small American chestnuts can be found along the trails, but I've only found one bearing nuts (don't know if they're viable or not-they were all gone by the time I located the burrs).  The undergrowth is mostly rhododendron and sassafras.  The whole forest has been clearcut, probably many times, but the school has set aside a section as a nature preserve, which I'm very much in favor of.  Lynchburg proper has some enormous trees in parks and yards, mainly white and southern red oaks.

Will your upcoming book focus on the Blue Ridge as a whole, or some of its many parts?  The forests only, or the general landscape?  I'll be a buyer either way.  And I'd love to see some pictures of the James River - beautiful at sunset.  

James,

I just purchased a rangefinder and clinometer, so I'll give the measuring a whirl, but it will be on a very part-time, amateur basis for now.  My brother has a forestry degree from SUNY ESF and isn't familiar with many of the concepts explored by ENTS.  This is really cutting-edge stuff, and like I wrote in my previous post, I'm thankful for everyone's efforts.

Neil,

When I say "I'm from NY," most people assume I'm talking about the city.  They don't seem to know anything about the remaining 90% of the state.  I've been most everywhere in NY, from Long Island to the North Country to the Niagara region to the Adirondacks and the Catskills, and it's an amazingly diverse, beautiful place.  Corrupt government and high taxes aside, it's a great place to live.  

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks
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#7)  Re: Hello, All

Postby ElijahW » Sun Jul 10, 2011 11:11 pm

Almost forgot here's some pics of one of the chestnuts in Lynchburg, VA
download/file.php?id=4318
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"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks
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#8)  Re: Hello, All

Postby GrandpaChestnut » Fri Sep 23, 2016 4:01 pm

You mentioned trees in the Howland Island Wildlife area. I know if a big American Chestnut there that I would like someone to check on sometime. I can give directions if you email me at fajknichols.75@gmail.com
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#9)  Re: Hello, All

Postby GrandpaChestnut » Fri Sep 23, 2016 4:18 pm

The NY chapter of TACF has been supporting SUNY-ESF for 26 years to develop a blight resistant American chestnut. Attached is a picture of two seedlings the are from the same mother tree. The tree was pollinated with pollen from our blight resistant tree and only one of the seedlings got the OXO gene. Inotially the OXO gene is only on one side of othe croomosome and therefore onlyu 50% of the seedlings/nuts will get the blight resistant gene. As soon as we have a blight resistant tree big enough to produce burs we can cross pollinate to get a tree that  is homozygous for the OXO gene, and then 100% of the seedlings from that tree will be blight resistant. See link for information on the SUNY-ESF web site.  http://www.esf.edu/chestnut/genes.htm
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#10)  Re: Hello, All

Postby jclarke » Fri Sep 23, 2016 8:11 pm

Allan, here's a tree for you.  It came as a potted seedling from New York somewhere around 1903.  It lives in Nova Scotia now.
http://s6.postimg.org/v5b3lohe9/Ashdale ... r_size.jpg
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