Page 1 of 1

Oldest Tree in Connecticut Followup

PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 10:58 am
by jcruddat
Hi all,
    For those of you who are interested, I recently published an article in the Connecticut Woodlands Magazine to follow up from my first post called Oldest Tree in Connecticut? found here: (viewtopic.php?f=18&t=7887). For those of you who have not seen that post, the article is about a 550-600 year old eastern red-cedar which is now the oldest known tree in the state of Connecticut. I attached the most recent version I could find since the revised article can only be accessed from subscribers to the magazine. They are, however, essentially the same.

Jack Ruddat

Re: Oldest Tree in Connecticut Followup

PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 3:48 pm
by Larry Tucei
Jack-  I really enjoyed your article and congratulations on such a find.  When we - some NTS members were in southwestern Colorado I came across a similar tree at Piedra River Archuleta Co., Colorado.  The tree had great age and character as well. It would be cool to know how old it was.  Larry

Re: Oldest Tree in Connecticut Followup

PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 6:20 pm
by jcruddat
Thanks,
    Would definitely core that tree it if I could.

Jack

Re: Oldest Tree in Connecticut Followup

PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:51 am
by Rand
Didn't know this:  
Trees start growing wood from the buds down, so a very harsh growing season may prevent the tree from adding wood cells all the way to the base of the trunk. Each place where growth stopped is where two or more rings become locally “wedged” into one ring.


I guess that explains why you don't see the bark crack and crack on bigger trees until later in the summer.

Re: Oldest Tree in Connecticut Followup

PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2017 6:16 pm
by ElijahW
Jack,

I enjoyed reading your article.  It was well-written and interesting, and your photo of the cedar is beautiful.  Great job,

Elijah

Re: Oldest Tree in Connecticut Followup

PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2017 7:05 pm
by MarkGraham
Very interesting article, congratulations.  The photo certainly depicts the tree's age as well as the reason why technical climbing gear was required to approach.

Re: Oldest Tree in Connecticut Followup

PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2017 11:17 pm
by jcruddat
Thanks. My next target species for old age in Connecticut is probably going to be black gum (nyssa sylvatica) and then northern white-cedar (thuja arborvitae). I know that there at least a few black gum swamps with old growth characteristics and some swamps containing northern white-cedar (not sure if they are old growth). Since northern white-cedar are locally rare in Connecticut, I am not sure if there are any growing in the trap rock ridges or green mountains near Salisbury, CT. Perhaps they are all confined to only a few scattered northern white-cedar swamps.

Jack

Re: Oldest Tree in Connecticut Followup

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:51 am
by dbhguru
Jack,

 We salute you and support your mission. It is always exciting to discovery a natural treasure in a place where it is not expected to be. Ancient trees in southern New England are that kind of treasure. We anxiously await your next discovery.

Bob