Tree on my block!

Discussions of Urban Forests and trees in general, including their growth, care, and impact on society. Discussions of specific trees, parks or forests in urban areas should be included in the proper forum of the Trip Reports and Site Descriptin category of this BBS.

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Jenny
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Tree on my block!

Post by Jenny » Tue Apr 06, 2010 4:14 pm

For the first time ever (probably), a tree has been planted on my block in NYC! 7th Ave. between 22nd and 23rd. I put in a request for one over a year ago and I guess it made a difference. It's a honey locust (says the tag on it). Hope it survives...

Jenny
DSC03424.jpg
Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them. ~Bill Vaughn

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James Parton
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Re: Tree on my block!

Post by James Parton » Tue Apr 06, 2010 8:41 pm

Congratulations Jenny!

You just added a bit of beauty to the city. It looks like a good-sized tree too.

James
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
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New Order of Druids

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Rand
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Re: Tree on my block!

Post by Rand » Tue Apr 06, 2010 9:01 pm

The poor little thing looks...lonely...

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Lee Frelich
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Re: Tree on my block!

Post by Lee Frelich » Wed Apr 07, 2010 8:07 am

Jenny:

Its more likely to survive there than if planted in a similar situation in Minneapolis, where it could be killed by salt used to melt the ice during the winter.

The main danger for the tree will probably be people knocking off the bark by using it as a bike rack.

I wonder if there is really enough soil there for it to grow large, or if it will be a dwarf?

Lee

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Jenny
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Re: Tree on my block!

Post by Jenny » Wed Apr 07, 2010 8:51 am

Lee/James/Rand,

There can't be very much soil depth there. A subway runs directly underneath! For now it is protected by a mini-"scaffolding". I never thought about the bikes. Oh! I just looked out the window and saw that there is a bike rack right beside it. Hope it helps.

I didn't know much about honey locust trees except they have those scary thorns. But I just read this on the USDA Fact Sheet:
"Thornless and fruitless varieties have been developed by the horticultural industry and are used extensively in landscaping. The trees are very hardy and are often used in parking lot islands and along side walks."

And it does look pretty lonely. Poor city trees.

(As for Minneapolis, I don't know how ANYTHING survives there! Except for the Mall of America, of course)

Jenny
Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them. ~Bill Vaughn

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Marcboston
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Re: Tree on my block!

Post by Marcboston » Wed Apr 07, 2010 9:20 am

"Tree on my block" I thought that was a J-Lo song?

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Steve Galehouse
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Re: Tree on my block!

Post by Steve Galehouse » Wed Apr 07, 2010 9:56 pm

Jenny-

It's too bad the only honey-locusts grown for planting are thornless and fruitless. The true species has nasty forked and branched thorns that cover the trunk and lower branches, like an Acacia from Africa, and the twisted, sinuous seed pods look like writhing snakes when blowing in the wind, like Medusa. And the edible flesh within the pods between the seeds tastes like a rich, sweet carrot bread. The cultivated varieties are so "dumbed-down" they are hardly worth growing, IMHO(except when nothing else might grow, as on your street in the City).

Steve
every plant is native somewhere

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Beth
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Re: Tree on my block!

Post by Beth » Wed Apr 07, 2010 11:47 pm

I didn't know that you can eat locust pods. I knew that cows love them. They eat the entire pod and deposit the undigested seeds with fertlizer which makes them a HUGE nuisance in a pasture. To put it mildly.
Trees are the Answer

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James Parton
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Re: Tree on my block!

Post by James Parton » Thu Apr 08, 2010 9:30 am

Jenny and All,

The thorns are what gives the plant it's unusual beauty. I feel the same way about the Hawthorns and Trifoliate Orange. The seedpods have a thick syrupy taste inside. There is a tall one at the edge of my father's property near Lowndesville SC. I have wondered if anyone has ever been able to use the seed pods in a practical way. Maybe the syrup can be extracted? I measured one to 85.5 feet tall on the property of the Kellogg Conference Center.

Its cultivars are popular ornamental plants, especially in the northern plains of North America where few other trees can survive and prosper. It tolerates urban conditions, compacted soil, road salt, alkaline soil, heat and drought. The popularity is in part due to the fact that it transplants so easily. The fast growth rate and tolerance of poor site conditions make it valued in areas where shade is wanted quickly, such as new parks or housing developments, and in disturbed and reclaimed environments, such as mine tailings. It is resistant to Gypsy moths but is defoliated by another pest, the mimosa webworm. Spider mites, cankers, and galls are a problem with some trees.-Wikipedia.

James
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

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