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Urban/Suburban Tree Density Reveals Inequality

Posted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 7:22 am
by Jenny
I think this is not news to anyone; more money in neighborhoods, more trees. At least, more trees that are cared for. But someone posted this on Facebook and I felt compelled to post it. I now have 2 trees on my block so I must be coming up in the world (actually I live on an avenue and not a side street. Avenues have much more traffic. They run up and down NYC, streets run across.)

http://persquaremile.com/2012/05/24/inc ... rom-space/

Jenny

(And can't post anything without congratulating SANTANA and the METS!!!!!!)

Re: Urban/Suburban Tree Density Reveals Inequality

Posted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 12:12 pm
by ElijahW
Jenny,

This is an interesting observation. From what I've seen, I would agree with the basic premise. I think a direct relationship commonly exists between the affluence of a neighborhood and the average crown size, girth, and age per tree. In other words, the better the neighborhood, the bigger the average tree. The exception may be trailer parks. I've seen some well-forested ones (at least on the outside borders). Why do you think this tree/money relationship exists? I have a few ideas, but doubt it has much to do with the cost of planting trees; this can be done very inexpensively (or for just the cost of one's own labor, if the needed time and patience is there, and a seed source is nearby). For example, I've planted about 70 or 80 trees within the last five years, and the total out of pocket cost (seedlings, mulch, hand-tools) was probably less than $200. Any thoughts?

As a Yankees fan, I'll begrudgingly give props to Santana and the Mets. The three of four people who actually admit to rooting for the Mets have had to wait a long time for a no-hitter. They should savor this moment for as long as they wish.

Elijah

Re: Urban/Suburban Tree Density Reveals Inequality

Posted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 7:49 am
by Jenny
Elijah,

That's a great observation. I'll have to take special note when passing by suburban trailer parks.

Also, of course, there are the city parks themselves. Central Park with god know how many trees (actually the Parks Dept. knows....), is used by people in all economic brackets if they live in Manhattan. Brooklyn and the Bronx also have a lot of parks, as well as Staten Island. But the poor planning in Queens leaves many "parkless". (Which makes it the easiest place to find a decent apartment....but then, you'd have to live there. We're looking to move and check out apartments in Queens where, in some areas, we can double our space for the same rent, yet, we come back home to our Chelsea, Manhattan apartment and embrace our ever cluttered abode. I can be in Central Park in 20 minutes by train.)

And I'm proud and resigned to being a Mets fan! How could I possibly root for the Evil Empire in the Bronx???

Jenny

Re: Urban/Suburban Tree Density Reveals Inequality

Posted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 1:21 pm
by Rand
lucager1483 wrote:Jenny,
I have a few ideas, but doubt it has much to do with the cost of planting trees; this can be done very inexpensively (or for just the cost of one's own labor, if the needed time and patience is there, and a seed source is nearby). For example, I've planted about 70 or 80 trees within the last five years, and the total out of pocket cost (seedlings, mulch, hand-tools) was probably less than $200. Any thoughts?
Yeah, I'm a little at a loss about the cost of planting trees. I mean gee, take a walk in september and pick up a few acorns and stick them in the ground..