Least favorite trees

General discussions of forests and trees that do not focus on a specific species or specific location.

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sradivoy
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Re: Least favorite trees

Post by sradivoy » Thu Feb 11, 2016 12:53 pm

The Osage orange for dropping its softball size fruit on the windshield of my car while driving. Aside from being startled I almost lost control of my car!

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Lucas
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Re: Least favorite trees

Post by Lucas » Thu Feb 11, 2016 2:24 pm

ElijahW wrote: an AMC Gremlin...anywhere in public view.
amcgremlin.jpg
You are not alone.

https://www.google.ca/webhp?sourceid=ch ... %20gremlin

http://comediansincarsgettingcoffee.com ... -virginity

Gremlin = “The Sound of Virginity”
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Least favorite trees

Post by Erik Danielsen » Thu Feb 11, 2016 3:45 pm

sradivoy wrote:The Osage orange for dropping its softball size fruit on the windshield of my car while driving. Aside from being startled I almost lost control of my car!
I'll have a treat for you on Saturday.

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Don
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Re: Least favorite trees

Post by Don » Thu Feb 11, 2016 4:15 pm

Was the same designer responsible for the Pontiac Aztec?
ElijahW wrote:Steve,
"One of the best landscape improvement treatments for Silver maple one can utilize includes a chainsaw!"
I love it! The strange thing about silver maple, blue spruce, and a few other commonly planted species is that I really enjoy seeing them in their native habitat. Some trees just don't belong in certain places, kind of like a fat lady in a swimsuit contest or boxed wine in a fine restaurant or an AMC Gremlin...anywhere in public view.
amcgremlin.jpg
Elijah
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

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View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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JHarkness
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Re: Least favorite trees

Post by JHarkness » Mon Aug 27, 2018 8:41 am

There hasn't been much activity here in a while, but I really want to list a few of my least favorites...

Tree-of-Heaven (or perhaps Tree-of-Hell?) - it seemingly can't be killed, it grows everywhere once one seed has gotten someplace, and even young trees can produce root suckers up to a hundred feet from their stems... Oh, they've also been known to cause heart inflammation just by touching the bark.

Norway Spruce - I very much like the species in it's native range, and I like them here as a yard tree, or in a well managed mixed plantation, but they're absolutely terrible in an unthinned, densly planted plantation. This winter, I'll be thinning some of the plantations on my property of them, many of them are stressed and dying of a needlecast.

Amur Corktree - The only tree, aside from maybe tree-of-heaven, that I actually hate... They've crept all across New England invading disturbed sites, no one seems to ever notice them, they produce thousands of seedlings in one year (oh, and birds disperse their berries),they're incredibly shade tolerant so they can invade mature forests as well. Oh yes, they also produce a chemical through their root system which has been known to stunt or even kill, oaks, pines and maples. Let's not forget that they're just about as hard to kill as tree-of-heaven, or that if you bruise their foliage or damage their bark you're left with a horrendous smell...


While it's not a tree, the plant I dislike most of all is, nasty, fast growing Japanese barberry, armed with razor sharp, almost invisible thorns that will take days to dig out and weeks for the pain to disappear. And don't forget that ticks love these evil little shrubs or that several species of invasive earthworms have been determined to have an association with them. However, multiflora rose doesn't rank far behind barberry on my list...

Joshua
"Be not simply good; be good for something." Henry David Thoreau

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Least favorite trees

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Mon Aug 27, 2018 12:19 pm

PAwildernessadvocate wrote:Probably ailanthus, because they're invasive, and because they smell like rancid peanut butter!
JHarkness wrote:Tree-of-Heaven (or perhaps Tree-of-Hell?) - it seemingly can't be killed, it grows everywhere once one seed has gotten someplace, and even young trees can produce root suckers up to a hundred feet from their stems... Oh, they've also been known to cause heart inflammation just by touching the bark.
Aha! So I'm not alone after all.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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Don
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Re: Least favorite trees

Post by Don » Mon Aug 27, 2018 3:27 pm

Time for a western entry...my first introduction to Cercocarpus betulina (birch leaf mountain mahogany) was as a first year forestry aid for the Bureau of Land Managment in eastern Oregon (north of Burns, in the Rudio Mountains above the John Day River Valley. Our assigned task was to restore original section/quarter corners and boundary lines (originally surveyed in 1880's, and not revisited since), which entailed using original survey equipment and magnetic declinations and running off the original surveyors notes. When we got to "...descended into the middle of an old grove of mountain mahogany, perhaps 40 acres in size, unfit for passage by humans..." We suspected we might have a tough day ahead of us. This was in a time when chain saws were bulky, heavy, and not a popular choice, after getting several miles in, away from the truck. I can still recall the feel of my razor sharp (on one side!) double bit axe as I swung it into those old-growth mountain mahogany bases...not unlike swinging a bat into a close line pole...and the aching of virtually all the muscles in my hands and wrists...to add to our adventure, the timing was such that the pollen was being released, with the hairy achenes lucent in the crowns over head...water became essential, but not effective in getting our throats/sinuses clear, once we were through the grove.
All said and done, as an 17 year old in my first summer forestry job away from home, I wouldn't have traded jobs with anyone...great experience, great time (1967)!
-don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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