Medicine Bow

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dbhguru
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Medicine Bow

Post by dbhguru » Sat Aug 04, 2012 9:06 pm

NTS,

Today Monica and I climbed Medicine Bow Peak in the Medicine Bow Range of the Wyoming Rockies. The summit is 12,013 feet, and we felt every foot of it. But it was worth the pain. What a great place.

Here is a view from the trail looking south toward Old Main, the Diamond, etc. Old Main is 11,755 feet elevation. The Diamond is 11,720 feet. Please remember to double click to see the images in larger format.
MB-1.jpg
Here are two shots of Monica on the trail. She did fabulously. There were lots of people climbing the peak, and all were in excellent shape.
MB-4.jpg
MB-7.jpg
The rocks near the summit are fascinating. We needed Ed for an interpretation. Lots of quartzite, but there were other types of rocks as well. Some are ancient. The peak on tye horizon is Elk Mountain, a detached part of the Medicine Bow.
MB-8.jpg

The flat summit in the distance is Browns Peak.
MB-10.jpg
Here is a distant view of Medicine Bow Peak.
MB-14.jpg
Sugar Loaf.
MB-16.jpg
Libby Lake. Elevation 10,722 ft.
MB-18.jpg
MB-19.jpg
Fireweed
MB-23.jpg

Lingering snow, high on Medicine Bow.
MB-20.jpg
More to come.

Bob
Attachments
MB-1.jpg
MB-1.jpg
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

Joe

Re: Medicine Bow

Post by Joe » Sun Aug 05, 2012 6:46 am

Bob, regarding that steep face of the mountain, I wonder if anyone bothers to climb that? I can see all the loose material that is accumulating at the bottom so the cliff might be unstable- it would probably be very difficult even for the best techincal climbers- though of course that makes for a challenge. Or, maybe that loose material is glacial debris. Ed?
Joe

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edfrank
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Re: Medicine Bow

Post by edfrank » Sun Aug 05, 2012 8:48 am

Joe,

I am unsure about the geology there. The rock looks like it has plenty of cracks, but I would not know about the stability without seeing for myself. I would guess the debris at the base are pieces from the cliff itself rather than glaciers. Mountain glaciers would carve a clean path while growing and would deposit till as they retreat, but I don't think that distribution would be from till.

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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dbhguru
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Re: Medicine Bow

Post by dbhguru » Sun Aug 05, 2012 9:02 am

Joe, Ed,

Ed, your explanation is correct with respect to the talus slopes. The overall topography is glacial, as to be expected. Lots of erratics. Joe, there are places where the rock is excellent for climbing, but nobody climbs the loose stuff.

More images.

Libby Lake
MB-17.jpg
Looking toward Old Main, the Diamond, and School House Rock.
MB-22.jpg
Well, it is eastward ho in about an hour.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Medicine Bow

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Sun Aug 05, 2012 9:28 am

One of my pals climbed that mountain last year. He had to race a thunderstorm down the mountain. It hit the summit just as he got back down, fortunately. Looks like a peak that should definitely be on my someday bag-list.

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Don
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Re: Medicine Bow

Post by Don » Sun Aug 05, 2012 5:30 pm

Bob-
As a once avid backpacker of wildernesses, these photos are tantalizing!
Regarding the two images with Monica in them, the backdrop includes glacial lakes (called tarns), and if I'm interpreting the topography correctly, a series of tarns descending along the base of the steep (perhaps glacially carved) ridge, called 'pater noster' lakes (latin for prayer beads, as I recall from my Junior College Geology class).
Well done on the 10K/12K elevations, were you prepared for the unfiltered UV up there?
-Don
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dbhguru
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Re: Medicine Bow

Post by dbhguru » Sun Aug 05, 2012 9:21 pm

Don,

Reasonably prepared for the UV. Sun was intense. Here is the last batch of Medicine Bow images.

Lake Marie and 11,755-ft Old Main.
MB-27.jpg

Monica contemplating the superlative scenery on her perch above Lake Marie.
MB-30.jpg
Looking across Marie toward Sugar Loaf.
MB-29.jpg
The 11,720-foot Diamond
MB-31.jpg
SURPRISE!!
MB-33.jpg
MB-34.jpg

We were grateful to Medicine Bow for the gifts it bestowed on us.

BOB
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Medicine Bow

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Aug 07, 2012 3:13 pm

Bob, The images you have posted from Medicine Bow are inspiring. I'll bet you could drink from the Lake and the fishing must be great. What an impressive climb for you guys. Beautiful! I sure hope I get to go to all the places you and Monica have visited in the last couple of months. Thanks for sharing. You know Bob you could almost start a NWS (Native Wilderness Society), or NMS (Native Mountain Society) with all your adventures! Love the Moose photo. That is one huge animal! Larry

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dbhguru
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More photos of Medicine Bow

Post by dbhguru » Tue Aug 07, 2012 7:23 pm

NTS,

This is a photo looking northward toward Medicine Bow Peak. My previous shots from the climb were from the side of Medicine Bow looking in the direction of this photo. Schools House Rock, the Diamond, and Old Main are seen in the image. Medicien Bow Peak is the slightly rounded summit in the distance.
photo.JPG
Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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