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Tree -ring photos

Posted: Tue Jul 31, 2012 7:30 pm
by dbhguru
NTS,

On our Phillips Trail trek near Teton Pass, Dale Rounkles, my son-in-law, took images of a cut Doug fir stump. Here are three images.
Stump-1.jpg
Stump-2.jpg
Stump-3.jpg
Someone had done a field count and has etched the number 231 on the stump. I did a sampling and got 202. My photo count yielded 190. There is about 20 years to the base. So the tree was around 210 years when cut. There are countless firs in the area between 150 and 250 years and probably some between 300 and 400. The area is a big tree haven. Next year!.

Bob

Re: Tree -ring photos

Posted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 8:31 am
by Larry Tucei
Bob, Way cool photos. What was the Diameter of the stump? The growth rates are really tight .062- .125? Tree rings have always fascinated me and I would enjoy learning how to do some Coring the correct way. It doesn't look real difficult to core? Reading the cores on the other hand is the trick. Maybe when we gather up again someone could give a beginner's course. I want to make sure I don't injure the tree being cored. I would gladly invest in the Coring tool, equipment. It's just something that has always interested me. Larry

Re: Tree -ring photos

Posted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 9:37 am
by dbhguru
Larry,

The radius was 13.3 inches.

Bob

Re: Tree -ring photos

Posted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 10:01 am
by Joe
dbhguru wrote:Larry,

The radius was 13.3 inches.

Bob
Bob, what's the biggest core you can take? I know that the larger core tools are expensive.
Joe

Re: Tree -ring photos

Posted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 4:00 pm
by Larry Tucei
Bob, Wow! Do correct me if I'm wrong that equals near 16 rings per inch or .062 per year fascinating. Southern Long Leaf Pine stumps that I've seen have similar growth rates and some are even tighter to .031. I can only imagine that all the Ancient Forests would have had trees with these types of growth rates. It must have been a grand site. Larry