Tetons

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dbhguru
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Tetons

Post by dbhguru » Thu Jul 22, 2010 10:00 pm

ENTS,

The following images are from today's quick rendezvous with the Grand Tetons. I'll do a better job when I get back home. Posting to the bulletin board from motel WIFI connections is challenging.

The first image is from 8,401-ft Teton Pass. It looks toward the Gros Ventre Range.
TetonPass1Small.jpg
This next image is in Jackson Hole. It looks down a trail Monica and I were on. Lots of flowers, lots of sage brush, and a turn of the head toward the jagged summits of the incomparable Tetons. It was tempting not take every shot of the Tetons.
JacksonHole1Small.jpg
Nothing so impressive as the Grand -- all 13,774 feet of it.
GrandTeton1Small.jpg
Mount Moran is no slouch.
Moran1Small.jpg
I'll stop now before getting bumped off again. Frustrating!

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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edfrank
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Re: Tetons

Post by edfrank » Thu Jul 22, 2010 10:44 pm

Bob,

The Tetons are beautiful. Mount Moran has an interesting feature, the black vertical dike visible at the top. I am sure you are aware of it . but for others here are some photos from the information sign posted nearby.
Mount Moran
Mount Moran
Distinctive features of Mt. Moran tell of the powerful forces that created and shaped the teton Range.

The Sandsotne Cap

Nine million years ago the earth's crust broke into two rectangular blocks along the Teton Fault, a 40-mile long zone of weaknes. Through sporadic movements, the western block hinged skyward to become the Teton Range, while the eastern block tilted downward to form the valley called Jackson Hole. The sandstone remnant atop Mt. Moran, 6,000 feet above the valley floor, indicating that the valley dropped four times more than the mountains rose.

The Black Dike

Long before the rise of the Teton Range the Black Dike formed when magma was forced upward into a large crack. Tis mlten rock solidified, becomming the dark \, igneous rock, diabase. Erosion of the surrounding rock makes this vertical 150 foot thick dike clearly visible.

Today's Glaciers

Mt. Moran supports five of the dozen glaciers in the Teton range. Thes eglaciers flow from cavities carved by larer Ice Age mountain glaciers. Named for the large chunks of ice that break off its snout, Falling Ice Glacier lies just below the black dike.
aug14-117w.jpg
aug14-117w.jpg (74.81 KiB) Viewed 3116 times
aug14-117v.jpg
Ed

.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Tetons

Post by Larry Tucei » Fri Jul 23, 2010 6:55 am

Bob, Beautiful stuff! What an awesome adventure you two have been on! Although it can be harsh, the tranquilty and scenery of the west is an unforgettable experience! I can't wait to back someday. Larry

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dbhguru
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Re: Tetons

Post by dbhguru » Fri Jul 23, 2010 9:07 am

Ed and Larry,

Ed, thanks for adding the material on Moran. Here is a classic image of the Tetons from Jackson Hole.
GrandTeton2Small.jpg
The abrupt rise of the Tetons above Jackson Hole and the Snake River is one of the most dramatic scenes in the West. I took an altitude fix with my GPS at a lookout. The drop down to the Snake River between the lookout and the Tetons was about 100 more feet. My GPS read 6,650 feet. So the Snake is about 6,550. The rise to the summit of the Grand is (13,774 - 6,550 = 7,224 feet). That rise occurs without foothills. Very, very impressive.

On our way to the Tetons from Idaho, we crossed a small pass named Pine Pass at 6,741 feet. We were coming from an altitude of 4,500 feet. The vegetation was fairly lush compared to what we'd been through. I spotted a large Doug fir, so we stopped. It proved worth the stop. It is 12.1 feet in girth and 114.0 feet tall. Not shabby.
DougFirSmall.jpg
Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Tyler
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Re: Tetons

Post by Tyler » Fri Jul 23, 2010 9:12 am

Bob,

Beautiful shots! So peaceful looking.

Tyler

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Don
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Re: Tetons

Post by Don » Fri Jul 23, 2010 3:27 pm

Bob-
Back in the late '80s, I was sent out from Kentucky with a crew of Stage II firefighters to the Hunter Fire, just south across Jackson Hole (fire camp was in one of the campgrounds along the river) from the Gran Tetons. After 20 days, they gave us two days R and R...knowing Kentucky boys wanted to make the most of our time there, I arranged for three activities in those two days...one, we all took the tram up to the top of the Tetons; two, at the base we spent the evening at a restaurant and lounge at the base; and three, the next morning we took a raft trip down the Snake River (remember one of the rapids was called 'Ripsaw"!).
Upon our return from R and R, we were sent to fire in the wilderness in the Wind River Range, a little to the South. After coyote camping for a week (barest of all fire camps, MREs (packaged 'Meals Ready to Eat') and cubies (5 gal plastic cubes) of water, they sent in a National Guard Chinook (twin rotored, large helicopter) to ferry our twenty man crew to be de-mobbed (staged for being sent to a more distance fire complex in Southern Oregon).

Which is to say, man oh man, is that God's country or what!!!
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
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Marcboston
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Re: Tetons

Post by Marcboston » Fri Jul 23, 2010 4:28 pm

I have heard that middle Teton is not a technical climb unlike Grand Teton. Has anyone here climbed any of the Tetons?

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dbhguru
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Re: Tetons

Post by dbhguru » Sat Jul 31, 2010 7:10 am

Marc,

I think you are right, but I've only hiked in the Tetons. But virtually anything you do can be turned into a technical climb. They are intimidating mountains.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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