Give the Whitebark Pine of Yellowstone a fighting chance

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edfrank
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Give the Whitebark Pine of Yellowstone a fighting chance

Post by edfrank » Wed Jul 14, 2010 2:02 pm

Let's give the Whitebark Pine of Yellowstone a fighting chance.
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Tree Fight is an initiative to inform the public of the plight of the GYE’s whitebark pines, and to search for solutions to prevent their extinction. We're in the midst of our 2010 Field Campaign. On Saturday we protected one hundred trees near the top of Mt. Glory on Teton Pass. Tomorrow we do aerial reconnaissance of the Wind River Mountains...We'll let you know what we find.

http://www.treefight.org/

Glorious trees
Bark beetles pose a danger to the region’s most iconic tree.

By Cory Hatch, Jackson Hole, Wyo., July 14, 2010
...
TreeFight co-founder David Gonzales pointed out little balls of hardened sap that protrude from the limber pine’s bark like pimples. Here, he said, the tree’s defense mechanism tried to eject the invaders with a rush of sap.
...
Now, he and TreeFight co-founder Wally Macfarlane are organizing trips into whitebark pine habitat around the Jackson Hole area to educate people about the problem and to test the effectiveness of verbenone, a pheromone that has proven somewhat effective in repelling bark beetles from lodgepole pine.

With the help of people like Willie Kern and tree biologist Jesse Logan, who have flown over Greater Yellowstone to document the bark beetles’ effect on whitebark pine, Gonzales has mapped out several areas on the Bridger-Teton National Forest with healthy trees that might be saved.

TreeFight volunteers have already placed verbenone patches on whitebark pine stands in places such as the Mount Leidy Highlands and ridges near Holmes Cave on Togwotee Pass. By placing the verbenone patches in a grid, with patches spaced about 25 feet apart, Gonzales hopes to create a cloud of the pheromone to fool the beetles into thinking the trees are already filled to capacity with their insect brethren.
http://www.jhnewsandguide.com/article.php?art_id=6205
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"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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edfrank
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Whitebark pine moves one step closer to endangered species p

Post by edfrank » Mon Jul 19, 2010 9:55 pm

Sylvia Fallon’s Blog
Whitebark pine moves one step closer to endangered species protections
posted july 19, 2010
http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/sfall ... _step.html
The US Fish and Wildlife Service is scheduled to announce tomorrow that endangered species protection for whitebark pine “may be warranted.” This preliminary finding triggers a one year review before a final decision is issued, but is a positive indication that the service agrees that whitebark pine qualifies for protection under the Endangered Species Act. Tomorrow’s announcement comes as a result of a lawsuit that NRDC filed earlier this year to compel the government to issue a decision on our petition to list the whitebark pine as endangered.

If listed, whitebark pine will be the first, broadly distributed tree species to be designated as an endangered species. And the consequences of potentially losing this species are tremendous – not just because of its wide distribution throughout western US and Canada, but because of the important role it plays in its ecosystem.
...

Whitebark Pines: Endangered Trees

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hfLzCidG8c&feature=player_embedded

http://www.onearth.org Whitebark pine trees are in trouble. Growing in the Western mountains, these important trees provide habitat for small animals and food for grizzly bears. But global warming has driven the mountain pine beetle, a pest that attacks and kills the trees, into the areas where the whitebark's habitat. If measures aren't taken to combat global warming, iconic landscapes and entire ecosystems could be dramatically transformed.


..
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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