Washington's Tallest Tree Confirmed

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#11)  Re: Washington's Tallest Tree Confirmed

Postby M.W.Taylor » Wed Jun 21, 2017 1:11 am

MarkGraham wrote:Thanks for attaching the kmz files.  Looks like maybe another 300 footer about 120 feet SSW?   Great find in a forest fragment that is less than one square mile.   Mount St. Helen's 10 miles to the east looks quite spectacular.



Mark,  the software estimates that tree to be about 303 feet. it is in a flat area so it should be accurate.
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#12)  Re: Washington's Tallest Tree Confirmed

Postby Ranger Dan » Sat Jun 24, 2017 5:14 pm

About the Green River site that was mentioned...it woke me from my long slumber.  Yes, I am still lurking in the background.  My last year as a ranger with the Gifford Pinchot was 2006, and I have not been back.  However, I do remember posting about this stand of ancient trees, and hoped that someone would be able to visit it and report their findings.

I think it may well be the finest remaining stand of Douglas-fir on the planet, based on what I heard from a silviculturist who was working at the Cowlitz Valley Ranger District in Randle.  Her name was Brenda, but I don't recall her last name.  Anyway, she said that a survey had been made of this stand, and that it was determined that it contained either the greatest number of cubic feet of wood, or the greatest amount of total biomass, of any site ever studied, anywhere.  I couldn't believe that, having seen and heard about surveys made in the unbeatable redwoods.  If you asked around, I'll bet someone there or at Mt. St. Helens would be able to get you those documents about the Green River site.

I did get to the edge of this stand, and saw a few Doug firs about 10' dbh.  I couldn't get to the main part of the grove, because of high water in the river when I went one November day.  Water might be high now, with snow probably still melting in the watershed.  The best part is on the south side of the river.  It is so extraordinary that someone with the FS interred the ashes of a loved one there.  It is a rather remote place, very seldom seen, but the trail is severely damaged by horse traffic, particularly during elk season, when it's a gauntlet of slogholes.  Access by vehicle to the trailhead is over FS roads that are cleared around Memorial Day, so it should be open now, but call to find out before you go.  Otherwise you might be adding quite a few miles to your hike.  Timber company roads to the west go closer, but there is probably no access allowed there without special permission.

I also saw a couple noble fir sites on the west side of Mt. St. Helens, along trails.  I recall there not being very may big ones.  However, Goat Marsh is a site that I recall some FS people saying was a remarkable place for big nobles.  

When I was in the area, there were some very green and friendly people on staff in the Cowlitz Valley who were helpful to me in finding some old-growth sites, from which I made an old-growth guide around 1991 for the Packwood District, which was later encompassed in the CVRD.  I'm sure this document has disappeared long ago.

I have no idea about tree heights, but I would be interested to know how many really big dbh Douggies or other giants there are in the Green River site, and at Goat Marsh.
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#13)  Re: Washington's Tallest Tree Confirmed

Postby M.W.Taylor » Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:56 pm

Thank you for the detailed report Dan !


I have LiDAR for Goat Marsh loaded up and will post shortly (when I get to a higher speed WiFI). There are a number of 270'-280' in Goat Marsh. Bob Van Pelt located a near 300' specimen there but it died awhile back. The tallest found today was measured by Steve Sillett and is is 282 now, and dying.


Ranger Dan wrote:About the Green River site that was mentioned...it woke me from my long slumber.  Yes, I am still lurking in the background.  My last year as a ranger with the Gifford Pinchot was 2006, and I have not been back.  However, I do remember posting about this stand of ancient trees, and hoped that someone would be able to visit it and report their findings.

I think it may well be the finest remaining stand of Douglas-fir on the planet, based on what I heard from a silviculturist who was working at the Cowlitz Valley Ranger District in Randle.  Her name was Brenda, but I don't recall her last name.  Anyway, she said that a survey had been made of this stand, and that it was determined that it contained either the greatest number of cubic feet of wood, or the greatest amount of total biomass, of any site ever studied, anywhere.  I couldn't believe that, having seen and heard about surveys made in the unbeatable redwoods.  If you asked around, I'll bet someone there or at Mt. St. Helens would be able to get you those documents about the Green River site.

I did get to the edge of this stand, and saw a few Doug firs about 10' dbh.  I couldn't get to the main part of the grove, because of high water in the river when I went one November day.  Water might be high now, with snow probably still melting in the watershed.  The best part is on the south side of the river.  It is so extraordinary that someone with the FS interred the ashes of a loved one there.  It is a rather remote place, very seldom seen, but the trail is severely damaged by horse traffic, particularly during elk season, when it's a gauntlet of slogholes.  Access by vehicle to the trailhead is over FS roads that are cleared around Memorial Day, so it should be open now, but call to find out before you go.  Otherwise you might be adding quite a few miles to your hike.  Timber company roads to the west go closer, but there is probably no access allowed there without special permission.

I also saw a couple noble fir sites on the west side of Mt. St. Helens, along trails.  I recall there not being very may big ones.  However, Goat Marsh is a site that I recall some FS people saying was a remarkable place for big nobles.  

When I was in the area, there were some very green and friendly people on staff in the Cowlitz Valley who were helpful to me in finding some old-growth sites, from which I made an old-growth guide around 1991 for the Packwood District, which was later encompassed in the CVRD.  I'm sure this document has disappeared long ago.

I have no idea about tree heights, but I would be interested to know how many really big dbh Douggies or other giants there are in the Green River site, and at Goat Marsh.
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#14)  Re: Washington's Tallest Tree Confirmed

Postby Larry Tucei » Fri Jun 30, 2017 1:22 pm

Wow sounds like a super site. Would love to visit such a place before I die.  Larry
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#15)  Re: Washington's Tallest Tree Confirmed

Postby Larry Tucei » Fri Jun 30, 2017 1:34 pm

I was reading about Goat Marsh Research Area came across this link with a really cool photo somewhere near or in the Goat Marsh Area. https://www.oregonhikers.org/forum/view ... &view=next   http://www.oregonhikers.org/forum/viewt ... w=previous    Larry
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#16)  Re: Washington's Tallest Tree Confirmed

Postby longshadow » Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:47 pm

Last week, my brother Darvel and I revisited the amazing noble fir/Douglas fir stand in Goat Marsh Research Natural area. In 2013 Bob Van Pelt told me the location of "Goat Marsh Giant," world's largest known noble fir, and we wanted to see if it was still standing. I also wanted to photograph the whole tree and make a stitched image (attached). In 2001 the Goat Marsh Giant was 8.3 ft. DBH and 272 ft. tall. Today it has a dead top and is probably in the 260-270 ft. range. It would be great if someone could measure its new height. Darryl Lloyd
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largest known noble fir stitched 200w.jpg

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