Welcome to my neighborhood

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adam.rosen
Posts: 76
Joined: Sun May 15, 2011 7:20 pm

Welcome to my neighborhood

Post by adam.rosen » Sun Sep 25, 2011 2:04 pm

Not sure what it is about a lazy Sunday that induces me to let you meet the "family". I see I'm the second such post today. Vermont has some wonderful old growth--the most interesting is at Lord's Hill which I have posted about and will do so again, but there are other small patches here and there. Our second growth doesn't grow back nearly as quickly as in our southern neighbors, although the southern conneticut valley does get quite, "massachusetts like." Some of the most beautiful trees in Vermont are yard trees in front of old farm houses. Some where around 1850, Vermont farmers started planting trees in their front yards--more likely, Vermont farm women planted these trees, as the "front yard" was a women's domain. Some of these trees are now quite large and beautiful. They keep me company when I'm out for a run, a walk or simply going to work.

Sugar maple is the most common, but also we see white pine, white cedar, oak (red? swamp white?), giant silver maples and (not pictured here) the occasional cottonwood, now, 150 or even 180 years later, getting gargantuan. How was the decision made? Why plant a row of trees in the front yard? Shade, prestive, maple sap?

Old vermont roads are lined with sugar maples, and often these rows of maples seem to me to predate the yard trees. It seems to me that now sooner was land cleared in the post-revolutionary years, but the double rows of sugar maples were planted. Yard trees seldom reach quite the girth of the rows of sugar maples.

So, enough talk. Here are some of my favorite trees in the Montpelier area.

All the photos are very high resolution, double click for a better view.
Not exactly fall foliage, but an interesting example.  White cedars grow so slowly.  This could be 100-130 years old, maybe younger.  I don't really know.
Not exactly fall foliage, but an interesting example. White cedars grow so slowly. This could be 100-130 years old, maybe younger. I don't really know.
This silver maple is huge, spreading, right next to the winooski river.  The house in back is quite old, the tree must be younger.  This is the winooski flood plain and the soil is deep.
This silver maple is huge, spreading, right next to the winooski river. The house in back is quite old, the tree must be younger. This is the winooski flood plain and the soil is deep.
This silver maple is huge, spreading, right next to the winooski river.  The house in back is quite old, the tree must be younger.  This is the winooski flood plain and the soil is deep.
This silver maple is huge, spreading, right next to the winooski river. The house in back is quite old, the tree must be younger. This is the winooski flood plain and the soil is deep.
Attachments
Center road in east Montpelier has got more farms per linear mile than most roads.  The 1860-1900 era barns come one after another.  One section of the road is really narrow, lined on either side with sugar maples, in varying states of health, decay, snow plow damage, etc.  Here is a pretty happy section of nice old trees.
Center road in east Montpelier has got more farms per linear mile than most roads. The 1860-1900 era barns come one after another. One section of the road is really narrow, lined on either side with sugar maples, in varying states of health, decay, snow plow damage, etc. Here is a pretty happy section of nice old trees.
The view from my house, just for kicks.  Fall colors are still filling in.
The view from my house, just for kicks. Fall colors are still filling in.
And even the white pine got planted in the front yard.  This is down the street from my house, we walk here all the time.  Probably not even 100 years old.
And even the white pine got planted in the front yard. This is down the street from my house, we walk here all the time. Probably not even 100 years old.
How 'bouth this Oak?  Red, swamp white?  I don't really know.  It's next to an old farm house.  The largest tree in East Montpelier, where I live.
How 'bouth this Oak? Red, swamp white? I don't really know. It's next to an old farm house. The largest tree in East Montpelier, where I live.
Here is an interesting piece of second growth, along a road side.  We see these random elms all over the state.
Here is an interesting piece of second growth, along a road side. We see these random elms all over the state.
This is a classic Vermont farmhouse with a maple in the front yard.
This is a classic Vermont farmhouse with a maple in the front yard.
I like this view of the tremendous spreading branches of this huge maple.  This house is on the banks of the Winooski River.  It's a nice flat place to run.  And to admire trees.
I like this view of the tremendous spreading branches of this huge maple. This house is on the banks of the Winooski River. It's a nice flat place to run. And to admire trees.
another view of the silver maple.
another view of the silver maple.

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jamesrobertsmith
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Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 5:32 am

Re: Welcome to my neighborhood

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Sun Sep 25, 2011 2:14 pm

The view from yer house!!!! You are a lucky man!

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James Parton
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Re: Welcome to my neighborhood

Post by James Parton » Sun Sep 25, 2011 10:20 pm

jamesrobertsmith wrote:The view from yer house!!!! You are a lucky man!
I share a view similar to his. My home is surrounded by farm fields with farm barns a little distance off. Mt. Pisgah and foreground mountains form the backdrop. I just wish I " owned " it all.
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

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jamesrobertsmith
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Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 5:32 am

Re: Welcome to my neighborhood

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Mon Sep 26, 2011 6:33 am

If you can see Mount Pisgah, there's a good chance you were living on the edge of old Vanderbilt's estate before he got rid of it.

I forget how big his spread was...but it was a phenomenally huge chunk of private real estate.

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dbhguru
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Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Welcome to my neighborhood

Post by dbhguru » Mon Sep 26, 2011 7:38 am

Adam,

That view is gorgeous! Please send more pictures. As autumn approaches let's see if we can capture its glory for our fellow and lady Ents.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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adam.rosen
Posts: 76
Joined: Sun May 15, 2011 7:20 pm

Re: Welcome to my neighborhood

Post by adam.rosen » Tue Sep 27, 2011 8:31 pm

Friday I get to take my entire school for our annual "All School Hike" up Mount Elmore in Northern Vermont. I should have some good pictures of the view and a few special yellow birches along the way.

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