Lord's Hill

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#1)  Lord's Hill

Postby adam.rosen » Thu Jun 23, 2011 10:45 pm

I'm surprised to see the Lord's Hill natural area doesn't have a post.  It's state land surrounded by private land, and permission to visit can be obtained.  Old growth hardwoods and hemlocks are present, including what I have heard are state record's for height.
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yellow birch, with high snap.jpg
I wish I had some data on this huge old yellow birch. Obviously, that snap at 60' keeps this off the record books, but this tree has some girth.
maple, with photographer for perspective..jpg
another look at that same maple
sitting under huge maple.jpg
some friends under a large, tall, old maple. No height data.
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#2)  Re: Lord's Hill

Postby James Parton » Fri Jun 24, 2011 12:25 am

Very nice! You are off with a bang!
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145
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#3)  Re: Lord's Hill

Postby adam.rosen » Sun Nov 06, 2011 11:01 pm

I was back at Lord's Hill today, with a tape measure.  I have two views here of a big old maple tree.  It is is 151" DBH.  I also measured another maple at 11', a hemlock at 92", another hemlock, really, a large, dignified giant, of perfect dimensions, with a long, straight bole, at 9'1", and a basswood with a tall, long bole at 7'11".
Haven't bought that laser rangefinder yet, so I can't tell you how tall.
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#4)  Re: Lord's Hill

Postby dbhguru » Mon Nov 07, 2011 10:00 am

Adam,

   If you get a clinometer, a 100-foot tape measure, a couple of eye level high poles (or tripods), and a scientific calculator, the External Baseline Method (EBM) will give you about the same accuracy as the sine-sine method. It is admittedly a little harder to master than the sine-based method, but I can talk you through it.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder and Executive Director
Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest

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